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I want to add two strings to a string[] list without using a string array. I used a string array named str but I want to add d.Name and d.AvailableFreeSpace directly to list. Is there a way to do this?

public static List<string[]> GetReadyDrives()
{
    DriveInfo[] drives = DriveInfo.GetDrives();
    List<DriveInfo> readyDrives = new List<DriveInfo>();
    List<string[]> parsedReadyDrives = new List<string[]>();

    for (int i = 0; i < drives.Length; i++)
    {
        if (drives[i].IsReady)
        {
             readyDrives.Add(drives[i]);
        }
    }
    foreach (DriveInfo d in readyDrives)
    {
        string[] str=new string[2];
        str[0] = d.Name;
        str[1] = d.AvailableFreeSpace.ToString();
        parsedReadyDrives.Add(str);
    }
    return parsedReadyDrives;
}
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Please print out in pseudo-code exactly what you want the contents of your List<string[]> to look like at the end. It's not too clear to me right now. –  Kevin Anderson May 2 '12 at 13:53
1  
I ran this in Linqpad and it worked for me.. what problem are you having? –  Paula Bean May 2 '12 at 13:54
    
Instead of returning a list of string[] you can improve your design by creating a Drive class with a Name and a AvailableFreeSpace property and then return a list of these. Or just return a list of DriveInfo. Don't convert the AvailableFreeSpace to a string until you really need a string say when you want to print the value. –  Martin Liversage May 2 '12 at 14:01
    
Thanks for the answers. I'm kind of new to this and really need to learn LINQ asap and oop. –  Bora May 2 '12 at 14:12
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6 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted
public static List<string[]> GetReadyDrives()
{
    return DriveInfo.GetDrives()
        .Where(d => d.IsReady)
        .Select(d => new[] { d.Name, d.AvailableFreeSpace.ToString() })
        .ToList();
}

...but, to be honest, you'd be better off doing this:

class ReadyDriveInfo
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string AvailableFreeSpace { get; set; }
}

public static List<ReadyDriveInfo> GetReadyDrives()
{
    return DriveInfo.GetDrives()
        .Where(d => d.IsReady)
        .Select(d => new ReadyDriveInfo
            {
                Name = d.Name,
                AvailableFreeSpace = d.AvailableFreeSpace.ToString()
            })
        .ToList();
}

... but, even there, why do you want the free space as a string?

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Every element of a List<string[]> is an instance of string[]. So if you want to add strings individually, you can't. But you can add them as the single element in a single-element instance of string[]. Thus:

parsedReadyDrives.Add(new[] { d.Name });
parsedReadyDrives.Add(new[] { d.AvailableFreeSpace.ToString());

If you want them as the two elements of a two-element instance of string[], you'd say:

parsedReadyDrives.Add(new[] { d.Name, d.AvailableFreeSpace.ToString() });

Frankly, I think passing around a List<string[]> is really nasty. One major concern is that you're placing a very heavy burden on your callers to intimately know the structure of the List<string[]> and what each element of each element means. Additionally, it's not robust to change (you have a maintenance nightmare if you want to change the meaning of any single one element of any element in the List<string[]> or if you want to add additional elements. You might want to consider a more formal data structure that encapsulates your concerns more appropriately.

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Can you not just do this?

parsedReadyDrives.Add(new []{d.Name, d.AvailableFreeSpace.ToString()});

It's just syntactic sugar, though.

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Your list is composed of string arrays, so no, you can't add something to the list that is not a string array.

You can create an object composed of two strings, if that makes more sense for what you're trying to do, but you'd still have to initialize that object before adding it.

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Yes you can do:

parsedReadyDrives.Add(new string[]{d.Name, d.AvailableFreeSpace.ToString()});

So try to use some LINQ. Instead of your code try this to return what you want:

return DriveInfo.GetDrives().Where(x => x.IsReady).Select(x => new string[]{x.Name, x.AvailableFreeSpace.ToString()}.ToList();
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You can do it with single LINQ query:

public static List<string[]> GetReadyDrives()
{
    return DriveInfo.GetDrives()
        .Where(d => d.IsReady)
        .Select(d => new string[] { d.Name, d.AvailableFreeSpace.ToString() })
        .ToList();
}

UPDATE: I'd split code which finds ready drives and code which prepares what to write to file. In this case I don't need to look inside method to understand what contained in string array:

public static IEnumerable<DriveInfo> GetReadyDrives()
{
    return DriveInfo.GetDrives()
        .Where(d => d.IsReady);
}

Then just write what you need:

foreach(var drive in GetReadyDrives())
    WriteToFile(drive.Name, drive.AvailableFreeSpace);

Or even this way (but I like more option with descriptive method name):

foreach(var drive in DriveInfo.GetDrives().Where(d => d.IsReady))
    WriteToFile(drive.Name, drive.AvailableFreeSpace);
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