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I'm getting started with jquery and following the tutorial on the official website found here. http://docs.jquery.com/How_jQuery_Works#jQuery:_The_Basics

I'm in the section labeled Launching Code on Document Ready. If you notice, they provide two examples. One where an alert box pops up before taking you to jquery site, and another where an alert box prevents you from going to the site.

Suppose I want to have two links. One where an alert box appears and upon clicking "OK" it then proceeds on to jquery's site, and another that an alert box appears but prevents you from going to jquery's site. I'd just like to be able to figure out different responses for different links. Do I need to give it some sort of id?

Here's the code.

<!doctype html>
<html>
  <head>
    <meta charset="utf-8">
<title>Demo</title>
  </head>
  <body>
<script src="jquery.js"></script><br/>
<a href="http://jquery.com/" id="1">jQuery</a><br/> <!--first link: will display message and then proceed to site -->
<script>
 $(document).ready(function(){
    $("a#1").click(function(event){
      alert("Thanks for visiting!");
    });
  });
</script>
<a href="http://jquery.com/" id="2">jQuery</a> <!-- second link: message appears and does not continue to site -->
<script>
   $(document).ready(function(){
      $("a#2").click(function(event){
        alert("As you can see, the link no longer took you to jquery.com"); 
        event.preventDefault();
      });
    });
</script>

edit - added id's to anchors. Thank you guys, it works.

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2  
Yes, right now, you're attaching click() to every single <a> tag on the page. You have to target the <a>s you require by using selectors. This could be done giving each <a> a separate class, or id. –  Nadh May 2 '12 at 14:21
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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes, using id's is the most direct way to reference the anchors.

<a id="anchor1" href="..">anchor 1</a>

allows

$("#anchor1").click(function(event){
   alert("Thanks for visiting!");
   event.preventDefault();
});
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Yes, the $('a') selects all anchor elements (the 'a'-tags). If you select them all, like you did without specifying the selector further, the event handler will be hooked to all of them. So you can select different anchors by adding an id, like stated in the other answer:

<a id="anchor1" href="..">anchor 1</a>

allows

$('#anchor1').click(...);

Or you could refine the selection by using other attributes of the a-tag, like the ref-attribute or a data-* attribute, like so:

<a rel="preventme" href="..">anchor 1</a>

allows

$('a[rel="preventme"]').click(...);

and

<a data-mode="disable-link" href="..">anchor 2</a>

which allows

$('a[data-mode="disable-link"]').click(...)

You could even select all external links by their protocol, like

$("a[href^='http://']").click(...);
share|improve this answer
    
These selectors are great (and can be useful), but they might confuse newer jQuery users. If you include an example of using an id selector, I'll upvote you :) –  Ktash May 2 '12 at 14:32
    
added an example with ID, just for completeness. That is the simplest solution and was stated in another answer already –  David May 2 '12 at 14:37
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Yes.

Right now, $('a') grabs all elements on the page that are <a> elements. What you need is a way to distinguish between the two to only grab one of the elements. There are many ways to do this, but the easiest is by far adding an ID. IDs act as unique identifies on the page to style, manipulate, and/or grab single elements.

From there, as stated by @Sam Tyson's answer, you can use the following jQuery selector:

 $('#id1').click(

This jQuery selector uses the ID id1, and precedes it with the #, which is used to tell jQuery you are looking for something with that ID.

Another way to do this would be to use classes. If, for example, you had multiple links on the page that you wanted to prevent from continuing on to the next page, you could use a class name to group those together to handle them all at the same time. Classes, as opposed to IDs, are for grouping elements so that they can be styled, manipulated, or grabbed together. Adding a class to your links would allow you to do the following:

$('.do_not_follow_link').click(function (e) {
    e.preventDefault();
});

This would find all links with the class name do_not_follow_link and stop them from continuing on to the page that they are linked to.

Now, using selectors with jQuery, there are a lot more ways to do this, but these are the important ones that you should worry about for now.

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You should indeed assign an id to the links and reference to this id when binding your events. See this jsFiddle for a working example.

<a href="http://jquery.com/" id="link1">jQuery</a><br/> <!--first link: will display message and then proceed to site -->
<a href="http://jquery.com/" id="link2">jQuery</a> <!-- second link: message appears and does not continue to site -->

Then bind the events:

$(document).ready(function() {
    $("#link1").click(function(event) {
        alert("As you can see, the link no longer took you to jquery.com");
        event.preventDefault();
    });

    $("#link2").click(function(event) {
        alert("Thanks for visiting!");
    });
});​
share|improve this answer
    
Nice answer. I have one small issue. You shouldn't qualify ids with tagnames in selectors ("a#link2"). An id must be unique, so there is no need to qualify it. Also, placing the 'a' first will slow down the query. –  hellslam May 2 '12 at 17:44
    
Fixed, thanks @hellslam! –  marcok May 3 '12 at 8:29
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