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I need to take a C++ vector with potentially a lot of elements, erase duplicates, and sort it. Looks like this code will do the trick: (Correction--it won't; next time I'll test before posting. Thanks for the feedback.)

vec.erase(
      std::unique(vec.begin(), vec.end()),
      vec.end());
std::sort(vec.begin(), vec.end());

Is it faster to erase the duplicates first (as coded above) or perform the sort first? If I do perform the sort first, is it guaranteed to remain sorted after std::unique is executed?

Or is there a more efficient way to do all this?

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1  
Good gravy that was fast. Go hivemind! –  David Seiler Jun 25 '09 at 0:47
2  
I assume you don't have the option of checking before insert to avoid having dupes in the first place? –  Joe Jun 25 '09 at 0:48
    
Correct. That would be ideal. –  Kyle Ryan Jun 26 '09 at 0:00
2  
I would suggest correcting the code above, or really indicate that it's WRONG. std::unique assumes the range is already sorted. –  Matthieu M. Oct 19 '09 at 9:23
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12 Answers

up vote 122 down vote accepted

I agree with R. Pate and Todd Gardner; a std::set might be a good idea here. Even if you're stuck using vectors, if you have enough duplicates, you might be better off creating a set to do the dirty work.

Let's compare three approaches:

Just using vector, sort + unique

sort( vec.begin(), vec.end() );
vec.erase( unique( vec.begin(), vec.end() ), vec.end() );

Convert to set (manually)

set<int> s;
unsigned size = vec.size();
for( unsigned i = 0; i < size; ++i ) s.insert( vec[i] );
vec.assign( s.begin(), s.end() );

Convert to set (using a constructor)

set<int> s( vec.begin(), vec.end() );
vec.assign( s.begin(), s.end() );

Here's how these perform as the number of duplicates changes:

comparison of vector and set approaches

Summary: when the number of duplicates is large enough, it's actually faster to convert to a set and then dump the data back into a vector.

And for some reason, doing the set conversion manually seems to be faster than using the set constructor -- at least on the toy random data that I used.

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2  
+1 Nice evidence based rationale –  Faisal Vali Jun 25 '09 at 3:06
11  
I'm shocked that the constructor approach is consistently measurably worse than manual. You would that apart from some tiny constant overhead, it would just do the manual thing. Can anyone explain this? –  Ari Jun 25 '09 at 5:51
3  
Cool, thanks for the graph. Could you give a sense of what the units are for Number of Duplicates? (ie, around how large is "large enough")? –  Kyle Ryan Jun 26 '09 at 0:02
2  
@Kyle: It's pretty large. I used datasets of 1,000,000 randomly drawn integers between 1 and 1000, 100, and 10 for this graph. –  Nate Kohl Jun 26 '09 at 15:10
1  
@NateKohl Thank you for your reply. I found it quite surprising that the constructor method was constructor method was slower. Even more surprising that is still is in 2013. –  Viktor Dahl Feb 16 '13 at 19:14
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I'm not sure what you are using this for, so I can't say this with 100% certainty, but normally when I think "sorted, unique" container, I think of a std::set. It might be a better fit for your usecase:

std::set<Foo> foos(vec.begin(), vec.end()); // both sorted & unique already

Otherwise, sorting prior to calling unique (as the other answers pointed out) is the way to go.

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Well to the point! std::set is specified to be a sorted unique set. Most implementations use an efficient ordered binary tree or something similar. –  notnoop Jun 25 '09 at 2:23
    
+1 Thought of set as well. Didnt want to duplicate this answer –  Tom Jun 25 '09 at 2:28
    
Is std::set guaranteed to be sorted? It makes sense that in practice it would be, but does the standard require it? –  MadCoder Jun 25 '09 at 3:37
1  
Yup, see 23.1.4.9 "The fundamental property of iterators of associative containers is that they iterate through the containers in the non-descending order of keys where non-descending is defined by the comparison that was used to construct them" –  Todd Gardner Jun 25 '09 at 3:50
1  
@MadCoder: It doesn't necessarily "make sense" that a set is implemented in a way that is sorted. There are also sets implemented using hash tables, which are not sorted. In fact, most people prefer using hash tables when available. But the naming convention in C++ just so happens that the sorted associative containers are named simply "set" / "map" (analogous to TreeSet / TreeMap in Java); and the hashed associative containers, which were left out of the standard, are called "hash_set" / "hash_map" (SGI STL) or "unordered_set" / "unordered_map" (TR1) (analogous to HashSet and HashMap in Java) –  newacct Jun 25 '09 at 5:54
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std::unique only removes duplicate elements if they're neighbours: you have to sort the vector first before it will work as you intend.

std::unique is defined to be stable, so the vector will still be sorted after running unique on it.

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std::unique only works on consecutive runs of duplicate elements, so you'd better sort first. However, it is stable, so your vector will remain sorted.

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You need to sort it before you call unique because unique only removes duplicates that are next to each other.

edit: 38 seconds...

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unique only removes consecutive duplicate elements (which is necessary for it to run in linear time), so you should perform the sort first. It will remain sorted after the call to unique.

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Efficiency is a complicated concept. There's time vs. space considerations, as well as general measurements (where you only get vague answers such as O(n)) vs. specific ones (e.g. bubble sort can be much faster than quicksort, depending on input characteristics).

If you have relatively few duplicates, then sort followed by unique and erase seems the way to go. If you had relatively many duplicates, creating a set from the vector and letting it do the heavy lifting could easily beat it.

Don't just concentrate on time efficiency either. Sort+unique+erase operates in O(1) space, while the set construction operates in O(n) space. And neither directly lends itself to a map-reduce parallelization (for really huge datasets).

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What would give you map/reduce ability? The only one I can think of is a distributed merge sort and you can still only use one thread in the final merge. –  Zan Lynx Jun 25 '09 at 2:17
    
Yes, you must have one controlling node/thread. However, you can divide the problem as many times as required to place upper limits on the number of worker/child threads the controlling/parent thread deals with, and on the size of the dataset each leaf node must process. Not all problems are easily solvable with map-reduce, I simply wanted to point out there are people who deal with similar (on the surface, anyway) optimization issues, where dealing with 10 terabytes of data is called "Tuesday". –  Roger Pate Jun 25 '09 at 3:43
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Here's a template to do it for you:

template<typename T>
void removeDuplicates(std::vector<T>& vec)
{
    std::sort(vec.begin(), vec.end());
    vec.erase(std::unique(vec.begin(), vec.end()), vec.end());
}

call it like:

removeDuplicates<int>(vectorname);
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Templatize away! - but you can just write removeDuplicates(vec), without explicitly specifying the template arguments –  Faisal Vali Jun 25 '09 at 3:08
6  
Or even better, just have it take templated iterators directly (begin and end), and you can run it on other structures besides a vector. –  Kyle Ryan Jun 25 '09 at 23:58
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As already stated, unique requires a sorted container. Additionally, unique doesn't actually remove elements from the container. Instead, they are copied to the end, unique returns an iterator pointing to the first such duplicate element, and you are expected to call erase to actually remove the elements.

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Does unique require a sorted container, or does it simply only rearrange the input sequence so it contains no adjacent duplicates? I thought the latter. –  Roger Pate Jun 25 '09 at 2:13
    
@Pate, you're correct. It doesn't require one. It removes adjacent duplicates. –  sharth Jun 25 '09 at 2:40
    
If you have a container that may have duplicates, and you want a container that doesn't have any duplicated values anywhere in the container then you must first sort the container, then pass it to unique, and then use erase to actually remove the duplicates. If you simply want to remove adjacent duplicates, then you won't have to sort the container. But you will end up with duplicated values: 1 2 2 3 2 4 2 5 2 will be changed to 1 2 3 2 4 2 5 2 if passed to unique without sorting, 1 2 3 4 5 if sorted, passed to unique and erase. –  Max Lybbert Jun 25 '09 at 18:14
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std::set<int> s;
std::for_each(v.cbegin(), v.cend(), [&s](int val){s.insert(val);});
v.clear();
std::copy(s.cbegin(), s.cend(), v.cbegin());
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perhaps resize the vector after clearing it so that there is only 1 memory allocation when building the vector. Maybe prefer std::move instead of std::copy to move the ints into the vector instead of copying them since the set will not be needed later. –  YoungJohn Mar 3 at 20:10
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The standard approach suggested by Nate Kohl:

Just using vector, sort + unique

sort( vec.begin(), vec.end() );
vec.erase( unique( vec.begin(), vec.end() ), vec.end() );

doesn't work for vector of pointers.

Look carefully at the example in C++ web site:

http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/algorithm/unique/

In their example, the "so called duplicates" moved to the end are actually shown as ? (undefined values), because those "so called duplicates" are SOMETIMES "extra elements" and SOMETIMES there are "missing elements" that were in the original vector.

A problem occurs when using std::unique() on a vector of pointers to objects (memory leaks, bad read of data from HEAP, duplicate frees, which cause segmentation faults, etc).

Here's my solution to the problem: replace std::unique() with ptgi::unique().

See the file ptgi_unique.hpp below:

// ptgi::unique()
//
// Fix a problem in std::unique(), such that none of the original elts in the collection are lost or duplicate.
// ptgi::unique() has the same interface as std::unique()
//
// There is the 2 argument version which calls the default operator== to compare elements.
//
// There is the 3 argument version, which you can pass a user defined functor for specialized comparison.
//
// ptgi::unique() is an improved version of std::unique() which doesn't looose any of the original data
// in the collection, nor does it create duplicates.
//
// After ptgi::unique(), every old element in the original collection is still present in the re-ordered collection,
// except that duplicates have been moved to a contiguous range [dupPosition, last) at the end.
//
// Thus on output:
//  [begin, dupPosition) range are unique elements.
//  [dupPosition, last) range are duplicates which can be removed.
// where:
//  [] means inclusive, and
//  () means exclusive.
//
// In the original std::unique() non-duplicates at end are moved downward toward beginning.
// In the improved ptgi:unique(), non-duplicates at end are swapped with duplicates near beginning.
//
// In addition if you have a collection of ptrs to objects, the regular std::unique() will loose memory,
// and can possibly delete the same pointer multiple times (leading to SEGMENTATION VIOLATION on Linux machines)
// but ptgi::unique() won't.  Use valgrind(1) to find such memory leak problems!!!
//
// NOTE: IF you have a vector of pointers, that is, std::vector<Object*>, then upon return from ptgi::unique()
// you would normally do the following to get rid of the duplicate objects in the HEAP:
//
//  // delete objects from HEAP
//  std::vector<Object*> objects;
//  for (iter = dupPosition; iter != objects.end(); ++iter)
//  {
//      delete (*iter);
//  }
//
//  // shrink the vector. But Object * pointers are NOT followed for duplicate deletes, this shrinks the vector.size())
//  objects.erase(dupPosition, objects.end));
//
// NOTE: But if you have a vector of objects, that is: std::vector<Object>, then upon return from ptgi::unique(), it
// suffices to just call vector:erase(, as erase will automatically call delete on each object in the
// [dupPosition, end) range for you:
//
//  std::vector<Object> objects;
//  objects.erase(dupPosition, last);
//
//==========================================================================================================
// Example of differences between std::unique() vs ptgi::unique().
//
//  Given:
//      int data[] = {10, 11, 21};
//
//  Given this functor: ArrayOfIntegersEqualByTen:
//      A functor which compares two integers a[i] and a[j] in an int a[] array, after division by 10:
//  
//  // given an int data[] array, remove consecutive duplicates from it.
//  // functor used for std::unique (BUGGY) or ptgi::unique(IMPROVED)
//
//  // Two numbers equal if, when divided by 10 (integer division), the quotients are the same.
//  // Hence 50..59 are equal, 60..69 are equal, etc.
//  struct ArrayOfIntegersEqualByTen: public std::equal_to<int>
//  {
//      bool operator() (const int& arg1, const int& arg2) const
//      {
//          return ((arg1/10) == (arg2/10));
//      }
//  };
//  
//  Now, if we call (problematic) std::unique( data, data+3, ArrayOfIntegersEqualByTen() );
//  
//  TEST1: BEFORE UNIQ: 10,11,21
//  TEST1: AFTER UNIQ: 10,21,21
//  DUP_INX=2
//  
//      PROBLEM: 11 is lost, and extra 21 has been added.
//  
//  More complicated example:
//  
//  TEST2: BEFORE UNIQ: 10,20,21,22,30,31,23,24,11
//  TEST2: AFTER UNIQ: 10,20,30,23,11,31,23,24,11
//  DUP_INX=5
//  
//      Problem: 21 and 22 are deleted.
//      Problem: 11 and 23 are duplicated.
//  
//  
//  NOW if ptgi::unique is called instead of std::unique, both problems go away:
//  
//  DEBUG: TEST1: NEW_WAY=1
//  TEST1: BEFORE UNIQ: 10,11,21
//  TEST1: AFTER UNIQ: 10,21,11
//  DUP_INX=2
//  
//  DEBUG: TEST2: NEW_WAY=1
//  TEST2: BEFORE UNIQ: 10,20,21,22,30,31,23,24,11
//  TEST2: AFTER UNIQ: 10,20,30,23,11,31,22,24,21
//  DUP_INX=5
//
//  @SEE: look at the "case study" below to understand which the last "AFTER UNIQ" results with that order:
//  TEST2: AFTER UNIQ: 10,20,30,23,11,31,22,24,21
//
//==========================================================================================================
// Case Study: how ptgi::unique() works:
//  Remember we "remove adjacent duplicates".
//  In this example, the input is NOT fully sorted when ptgi:unique() is called.
//
//  I put | separatators, BEFORE UNIQ to illustrate this
//  10  | 20,21,22 |  30,31 |  23,24 | 11
//
//  In example above, 20, 21, 22 are "same" since dividing by 10 gives 2 quotient.
//  And 30,31 are "same", since /10 quotient is 3.
//  And 23, 24 are same, since /10 quotient is 2.
//  And 11 is "group of one" by itself.
//  So there are 5 groups, but the 4th group (23, 24) happens to be equal to group 2 (20, 21, 22)
//  So there are 5 groups, and the 5th group (11) is equal to group 1 (10)
//
//  R = result
//  F = first
//
//  10, 20, 21, 22, 30, 31, 23, 24, 11
//  R    F
//
//  10 is result, and first points to 20, and R != F (10 != 20) so bump R:
//       R
//       F
//
//  Now we hits the "optimized out swap logic".
//  (avoid swap because R == F)
//
//  // now bump F until R != F (integer division by 10)
//  10, 20, 21, 22, 30, 31, 23, 24, 11
//       R   F              // 20 == 21 in 10x
//       R       F              // 20 == 22 in 10x
//       R           F          // 20 != 30, so we do a swap of ++R and F
//  (Now first hits 21, 22, then finally 30, which is different than R, so we swap bump R to 21 and swap with  30)
//  10, 20, 30, 22, 21, 31, 23, 24, 11  // after R & F swap (21 and 30)
//           R       F 
//
//  10, 20, 30, 22, 21, 31, 23, 24, 11
//           R          F           // bump F to 31, but R and F are same (30 vs 31)
//           R               F      // bump F to 23, R != F, so swap ++R with F
//  10, 20, 30, 22, 21, 31, 23, 24, 11
//                  R           F       // bump R to 22
//  10, 20, 30, 23, 21, 31, 22, 24, 11  // after the R & F swap (22 & 23 swap)
//                  R            F      // will swap 22 and 23
//                  R                F      // bump F to 24, but R and F are same in 10x
//                  R                    F  // bump F, R != F, so swap ++R  with F
//                      R                F  // R and F are diff, so swap ++R  with F (21 and 11)
//  10, 20, 30, 23, 11, 31, 22, 24, 21
//                      R                F  // aftter swap of old 21 and 11
//                      R                  F    // F now at last(), so loop terminates
//                          R               F   // bump R by 1 to point to dupPostion (first duplicate in range)
//
//  return R which now points to 31
//==========================================================================================================
// NOTES:
// 1) the #ifdef IMPROVED_STD_UNIQUE_ALGORITHM documents how we have modified the original std::unique().
// 2) I've heavily unit tested this code, including using valgrind(1), and it is *believed* to be 100% defect-free.
//
//==========================================================================================================
// History:
//  130201  dpb dbednar@ptgi.com created
//==========================================================================================================

#ifndef PTGI_UNIQUE_HPP
#define PTGI_UNIQUE_HPP

// Created to solve memory leak problems when calling std::unique() on a vector<Route*>.
// Memory leaks discovered with valgrind and unitTesting.


#include <algorithm>        // std::swap

// instead of std::myUnique, call this instead, where arg3 is a function ptr
//
// like std::unique, it puts the dups at the end, but it uses swapping to preserve original
// vector contents, to avoid memory leaks and duplicate pointers in vector<Object*>.

#ifdef IMPROVED_STD_UNIQUE_ALGORITHM
#error the #ifdef for IMPROVED_STD_UNIQUE_ALGORITHM was defined previously.. Something is wrong.
#endif

#undef IMPROVED_STD_UNIQUE_ALGORITHM
#define IMPROVED_STD_UNIQUE_ALGORITHM

// similar to std::unique, except that this version swaps elements, to avoid
// memory leaks, when vector contains pointers.
//
// Normally the input is sorted.
// Normal std::unique:
// 10 20 20 20 30   30 20 20 10
// a  b  c  d  e    f  g  h  i
//
// 10 20 30 20 10 | 30 20 20 10
// a  b  e  g  i    f  g  h  i
//
// Now GONE: c, d.
// Now DUPS: g, i.
// This causes memory leaks and segmenation faults due to duplicate deletes of same pointer!


namespace ptgi {

// Return the position of the first in range of duplicates moved to end of vector.
//
// uses operator==  of class for comparison
//
// @param [first, last) is a range to find duplicates within.
//
// @return the dupPosition position, such that [dupPosition, end) are contiguous
// duplicate elements.
// IF all items are unique, then it would return last.
//
template <class ForwardIterator>
ForwardIterator unique( ForwardIterator first, ForwardIterator last)
{
    // compare iterators, not values
    if (first == last)
        return last;

    // remember the current item that we are looking at for uniqueness
    ForwardIterator result = first;

    // result is slow ptr where to store next unique item
    // first is  fast ptr which is looking at all elts

    // the first iterator moves over all elements [begin+1, end).
    // while the current item (result) is the same as all elts
    // to the right, (first) keeps going, until you find a different
    // element pointed to by *first.  At that time, we swap them.

    while (++first != last)
    {
        if (!(*result == *first))
        {
#ifdef IMPROVED_STD_UNIQUE_ALGORITHM
            // inc result, then swap *result and *first

//          THIS IS WHAT WE WANT TO DO.
//          BUT THIS COULD SWAP AN ELEMENT WITH ITSELF, UNCECESSARILY!!!
//          std::swap( *first, *(++result));

            // BUT avoid swapping with itself when both iterators are the same
            ++result;
            if (result != first)
                std::swap( *first, *result);
#else
            // original code found in std::unique()
            // copies unique down
            *(++result) = *first;
#endif
        }
    }

    return ++result;
}

template <class ForwardIterator, class BinaryPredicate>
ForwardIterator unique( ForwardIterator first, ForwardIterator last, BinaryPredicate pred)
{
    if (first == last)
        return last;

    // remember the current item that we are looking at for uniqueness
    ForwardIterator result = first;

    while (++first != last)
    {
        if (!pred(*result,*first))
        {
#ifdef IMPROVED_STD_UNIQUE_ALGORITHM
            // inc result, then swap *result and *first

//          THIS COULD SWAP WITH ITSELF UNCECESSARILY
//          std::swap( *first, *(++result));
//
            // BUT avoid swapping with itself when both iterators are the same
            ++result;
            if (result != first)
                std::swap( *first, *result);

#else
            // original code found in std::unique()
            // copies unique down
            // causes memory leaks, and duplicate ptrs
            // and uncessarily moves in place!
            *(++result) = *first;
#endif
        }
    }

    return ++result;
}

// from now on, the #define is no longer needed, so get rid of it
#undef IMPROVED_STD_UNIQUE_ALGORITHM

} // end ptgi:: namespace

#endif

And here is the UNIT Test program that I used to test it:

// QUESTION: in test2, I had trouble getting one line to compile,which was caused  by the declaration of operator()
// in the equal_to Predicate.  I'm not sure how to correctly resolve that issue.
// Look for //OUT lines
//
// Make sure that NOTES in ptgi_unique.hpp are correct, in how we should "cleanup" duplicates
// from both a vector<Integer> (test1()) and vector<Integer*> (test2).
// Run this with valgrind(1).
//
// In test2(), IF we use the call to std::unique(), we get this problem:
//
//  [dbednar@ipeng8 TestSortRoutes]$ ./Main7
//  TEST2: ORIG nums before UNIQUE: 10, 20, 21, 22, 30, 31, 23, 24, 11
//  TEST2: modified nums AFTER UNIQUE: 10, 20, 30, 23, 11, 31, 23, 24, 11
//  INFO: dupInx=5
//  TEST2: uniq = 10
//  TEST2: uniq = 20
//  TEST2: uniq = 30
//  TEST2: uniq = 33427744
//  TEST2: uniq = 33427808
//  Segmentation fault (core dumped)
//
// And if we run valgrind we seen various error about "read errors", "mismatched free", "definitely lost", etc.
//
//  valgrind --leak-check=full ./Main7
//  ==359== Memcheck, a memory error detector
//  ==359== Command: ./Main7
//  ==359== Invalid read of size 4
//  ==359== Invalid free() / delete / delete[]
//  ==359== HEAP SUMMARY:
//  ==359==     in use at exit: 8 bytes in 2 blocks
//  ==359== LEAK SUMMARY:
//  ==359==    definitely lost: 8 bytes in 2 blocks
// But once we replace the call in test2() to use ptgi::unique(), all valgrind() error messages disappear.
//
// 130212   dpb dbednar@ptgi.com created
// =========================================================================================================

#include <iostream> // std::cout, std::cerr
#include <string>
#include <vector>   // std::vector
#include <sstream>  // std::ostringstream
#include <algorithm>    // std::unique()
#include <functional>   // std::equal_to(), std::binary_function()
#include <cassert>  // assert() MACRO

#include "ptgi_unique.hpp"  // ptgi::unique()



// Integer is small "wrapper class" around a primitive int.
// There is no SETTER, so Integer's are IMMUTABLE, just like in JAVA.

class Integer
{
private:
    int num;
public:

    // default CTOR: "Integer zero;"
    // COMPRENSIVE CTOR:  "Integer five(5);"
    Integer( int num = 0 ) :
        num(num)
    {
    }

    // COPY CTOR
    Integer( const Integer& rhs) :
        num(rhs.num)
    {
    }

    // assignment, operator=, needs nothing special... since all data members are primitives

    // GETTER for 'num' data member
    // GETTER' are *always* const
    int getNum() const
    {
        return num;
    }   

    // NO SETTER, because IMMUTABLE (similar to Java's Integer class)

    // @return "num"
    // NB: toString() should *always* be a const method
    //
    // NOTE: it is probably more efficient to call getNum() intead
    // of toString() when printing a number:
    //
    // BETTER to do this:
    //  Integer five(5);
    //  std::cout << five.getNum() << "\n"
    // than this:
    //  std::cout << five.toString() << "\n"

    std::string toString() const
    {
        std::ostringstream oss;
        oss << num;
        return oss.str();
    }
};

// convenience typedef's for iterating over std::vector<Integer>
typedef std::vector<Integer>::iterator      IntegerVectorIterator;
typedef std::vector<Integer>::const_iterator    ConstIntegerVectorIterator;

// convenience typedef's for iterating over std::vector<Integer*>
typedef std::vector<Integer*>::iterator     IntegerStarVectorIterator;
typedef std::vector<Integer*>::const_iterator   ConstIntegerStarVectorIterator;

// functor used for std::unique or ptgi::unique() on a std::vector<Integer>
// Two numbers equal if, when divided by 10 (integer division), the quotients are the same.
// Hence 50..59 are equal, 60..69 are equal, etc.
struct IntegerEqualByTen: public std::equal_to<Integer>
{
    bool operator() (const Integer& arg1, const Integer& arg2) const
    {
        return ((arg1.getNum()/10) == (arg2.getNum()/10));
    }
};

// functor used for std::unique or ptgi::unique on a std::vector<Integer*>
// Two numbers equal if, when divided by 10 (integer division), the quotients are the same.
// Hence 50..59 are equal, 60..69 are equal, etc.
struct IntegerEqualByTenPointer: public std::equal_to<Integer*>
{
    // NB: the Integer*& looks funny to me!
    // TECHNICAL PROBLEM ELSEWHERE so had to remove the & from *&
//OUT   bool operator() (const Integer*& arg1, const Integer*& arg2) const
//
    bool operator() (const Integer* arg1, const Integer* arg2) const
    {
        return ((arg1->getNum()/10) == (arg2->getNum()/10));
    }
};

void test1();
void test2();
void printIntegerStarVector( const std::string& msg, const std::vector<Integer*>& nums );

int main()
{
    test1();
    test2();
    return 0;
}

// test1() uses a vector<Object> (namely vector<Integer>), so there is no problem with memory loss
void test1()
{
    int data[] = { 10, 20, 21, 22, 30, 31, 23, 24, 11};

    // turn C array into C++ vector
    std::vector<Integer> nums(data, data+9);

    // arg3 is a functor
    IntegerVectorIterator dupPosition = ptgi::unique( nums.begin(), nums.end(), IntegerEqualByTen() );

    nums.erase(dupPosition, nums.end());

    nums.erase(nums.begin(), dupPosition);
}

//==================================================================================
// test2() uses a vector<Integer*>, so after ptgi:unique(), we have to be careful in
// how we eliminate the duplicate Integer objects stored in the heap.
//==================================================================================
void test2()
{
    int data[] = { 10, 20, 21, 22, 30, 31, 23, 24, 11};

    // turn C array into C++ vector of Integer* pointers
    std::vector<Integer*> nums;

    // put data[] integers into equivalent Integer* objects in HEAP
    for (int inx = 0; inx < 9; ++inx)
    {
        nums.push_back( new Integer(data[inx]) );
    }

    // print the vector<Integer*> to stdout
    printIntegerStarVector( "TEST2: ORIG nums before UNIQUE", nums );

    // arg3 is a functor
#if 1
    // corrected version which fixes SEGMENTATION FAULT and all memory leaks reported by valgrind(1)
    // I THINK we want to use new C++11 cbegin() and cend(),since the equal_to predicate is passed "Integer *&"

//  DID NOT COMPILE
//OUT   IntegerStarVectorIterator dupPosition = ptgi::unique( const_cast<ConstIntegerStarVectorIterator>(nums.begin()), const_cast<ConstIntegerStarVectorIterator>(nums.end()), IntegerEqualByTenPointer() );

    // DID NOT COMPILE when equal_to predicate declared "Integer*& arg1, Integer*&  arg2"
//OUT   IntegerStarVectorIterator dupPosition = ptgi::unique( const_cast<nums::const_iterator>(nums.begin()), const_cast<nums::const_iterator>(nums.end()), IntegerEqualByTenPointer() );


    // okay when equal_to predicate declared "Integer* arg1, Integer*  arg2"
    IntegerStarVectorIterator dupPosition = ptgi::unique(nums.begin(), nums.end(), IntegerEqualByTenPointer() );
#else
    // BUGGY version that causes SEGMENTATION FAULT and valgrind(1) errors
    IntegerStarVectorIterator dupPosition = std::unique( nums.begin(), nums.end(), IntegerEqualByTenPointer() );
#endif

    printIntegerStarVector( "TEST2: modified nums AFTER UNIQUE", nums );
    int dupInx = dupPosition - nums.begin();
    std::cout << "INFO: dupInx=" << dupInx <<"\n";

    // delete the dup Integer* objects in the [dupPosition, end] range
    for (IntegerStarVectorIterator iter = dupPosition; iter != nums.end(); ++iter)
    {
        delete (*iter);
    }

    // shrink the vector
    // NB: the Integer* ptrs are NOT followed by vector::erase()
    nums.erase(dupPosition, nums.end());


    // print the uniques, by following the iter to the Integer* pointer
    for (IntegerStarVectorIterator iter = nums.begin(); iter != nums.end();  ++iter)
    {
        std::cout << "TEST2: uniq = " << (*iter)->getNum() << "\n";
    }

    // remove the unique objects from heap
    for (IntegerStarVectorIterator iter = nums.begin(); iter != nums.end();  ++iter)
    {
        delete (*iter);
    }

    // shrink the vector
    nums.erase(nums.begin(), nums.end());

    // the vector should now be completely empty
    assert( nums.size() == 0);
}

//@ print to stdout the string: "info_msg: num1, num2, .... numN\n"
void printIntegerStarVector( const std::string& msg, const std::vector<Integer*>& nums )
{
    std::cout << msg << ": ";
    int inx = 0;
    ConstIntegerStarVectorIterator  iter;

    // use const iterator and const range!
    // NB: cbegin() and cend() not supported until LATER (c++11)
    for (iter = nums.begin(), inx = 0; iter != nums.end(); ++iter, ++inx)
    {
        // output a comma seperator *AFTER* first
        if (inx > 0)
            std::cout << ", ";

        // call Integer::toString()
        std::cout << (*iter)->getNum();     // send int to stdout
//      std::cout << (*iter)->toString();   // also works, but is probably slower

    }

    // in conclusion, add newline
    std::cout << "\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't understand the rationale here. So if you have a container of pointers, and you want to remove duplicates, how does that affect the objects pointed to by the pointers? No memory leaks would happen because there is at least one pointer (and exactly one in this container) that points to them. Well, well, I guess your method might have some merit with some strange overloaded operators or strange comparison functions that do require special consideration. –  kccqzy Feb 15 '13 at 3:02
    
Not sure if I understand your point. Take a simple case of a vector<int*>, where the 4 pointers point to integers {1, 2. 2, 3}. Its sorted, but after you call std::unique, the 4 pointers are pointers to integers {1, 2, 3, 3}. Now you have two identical pointers to 3, so if you call delete, it does a duplicate delete. BAD! Second, notice that the 2nd 2 is misssing, a memory leak. –  joe Feb 15 '13 at 17:50
    
kccqzy, heres the example program for you to understand my answer better: –  joe Feb 15 '13 at 18:11
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Here's the example of the duplicate delete problem that occurs with std::unique(). On a LINUX machine, the program crashes. Read the comments for details.

// Main10.cpp
//
// Illustration of duplicate delete and memory leak in a vector<int*> after calling std::unique.
// On a LINUX machine, it crashes the progam because of the duplicate delete.
//
// INPUT : {1, 2, 2, 3}
// OUTPUT: {1, 2, 3, 3}
//
// The two 3's are actually pointers to the same 3 integer in the HEAP, which is BAD
// because if you delete both int* pointers, you are deleting the same memory
// location twice.
//
//
// Never mind the fact that we ignore the "dupPosition" returned by std::unique(),
// but in any sensible program that "cleans up after istelf" you want to call deletex
// on all int* poitners to avoid memory leaks.
//
//
// NOW IF you replace std::unique() with ptgi::unique(), all of the the problems disappear.
// Why? Because ptgi:unique merely reshuffles the data:
// OUTPUT: {1, 2, 3, 2}
// The ptgi:unique has swapped the last two elements, so all of the original elements in
// the INPUT are STILL in the OUTPUT.
//
// 130215   dbednar@ptgi.com
//============================================================================

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <functional>

#include "ptgi_unique.hpp"

// functor used by std::unique to remove adjacent elts from vector<int*>
struct EqualToVectorOfIntegerStar: public std::equal_to<int *>
{
    bool operator() (const int* arg1, const int* arg2) const
    {
        return (*arg1 == *arg2);
    }
};

void printVector( const std::string& msg, const std::vector<int*>& vnums);

int main()
{
    int inums [] = { 1, 2, 2, 3 };
    std::vector<int*> vnums;

    // convert C array into vector of pointers to integers
    for (size_t inx = 0; inx < 4; ++ inx)
        vnums.push_back( new int(inums[inx]) );

    printVector("BEFORE UNIQ", vnums);

    // INPUT : 1, 2A, 2B, 3
    std::unique( vnums.begin(), vnums.end(), EqualToVectorOfIntegerStar() );
    // OUTPUT: 1, 2A, 3, 3 }
    printVector("AFTER  UNIQ", vnums);

    // now we delete 3 twice, and we have a memory leak because 2B is not deleted.
    for (size_t inx = 0; inx < vnums.size(); ++inx)
    {
        delete(vnums[inx]);
    }
}

// print a line of the form "msg: 1,2,3,..,5,6,7\n", where 1..7 are the numbers in vnums vector
// PS: you may pass "hello world" (const char *) because of implicit (automatic) conversion
// from "const char *" to std::string conversion.

void printVector( const std::string& msg, const std::vector<int*>& vnums)
{
    std::cout << msg << ": ";

    for (size_t inx = 0; inx < vnums.size(); ++inx)
    {
        // insert comma separator before current elt, but ONLY after first elt
        if (inx > 0)
            std::cout << ",";
        std::cout << *vnums[inx];

    }
    std::cout << "\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
PS: I also ran "valgrind ./Main10", and valgrind found no problems. I HIGHLY recommend all C++ programmers using LINUX to use this very productive tool, esp if you are writing real-time applications that must run 24x7, and never leak or crash! –  joe Feb 15 '13 at 18:20
    
The heart of the problem with std::unique can be summed up by this statement "std::unique returns duplicates in unspecified state" !!!!! Why the standards committee did this, I'll never know. Committe members.. any comments ??? –  joe Feb 15 '13 at 18:32
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