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I'm trying to find all of our code that re-throws exceptions where the new exception being thrown does not contain the original exception as the inner exception. Here's an example:

            catch(DBApplicationException dbEx) 
        {
            BaseApplicationException bEx = new BaseApplicationException(dbEx.Message, dbEx);
            bEx.MethodName = System.Reflection.Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().FullName + "::" + System.Reflection.MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod().Name.ToString();
            bEx.Severity = ExceptionSeverityLevel;
            PublishingManager.Publish(bEx,"");
            throw bEx;
        }
        catch(Exception e) 
        {
            BaseApplicationException bEx = new BaseApplicationException(e.Message);
            bEx.MethodName = System.Reflection.Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().FullName + "::" + System.Reflection.MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod().Name.ToString();
            bEx.Severity = ExceptionSeverityLevel;
            PublishingManager.Publish(bEx,"");
            throw bEx;
        }

The first catch (catch (DBApplicationException dbEx) gets re-thrown as BaseApplicationException, but as you can see, it sets the message as dbEx.Message, and then specifies the InnerException as dbEx, but the second catch segment re-throws without the InnerException, it only contains the e.Message.

So for my regex pattern, I only want to find the entire catch block that doesn't contain the inner exception, right now, the pattern I'm using returns both of these two catch blocks together.

Here's my regex pattern:

catch((.|\n|\r)*){((.|\n|\r)*)Exception\(((?!,).)+\);((.|\n|\r)*)}

Here's my method block to test this scenario:

public static DataSet SearchUserSessions(string username, string first, string last, string startDate, string endDate) 
    {
        DataSet ds = null;
        try 
        {
            SqlParameter [] arParms = new SqlParameter[]
            {
                new SqlParameter("@UserName", username),
                new SqlParameter("@FirstName", first),
                new SqlParameter("@LastName", last),
                new SqlParameter("@SessionStart", startDate),
                new SqlParameter("@SessionEnd", endDate)
            };

            DB db = new DB();
            ds = db.ExecuteDataset(SecurityConfig.ConnectionString, CommandType.StoredProcedure, 
                SPSearchUserSessions, (DB.Provider)SecurityConfig.ConnectionProviderType, 
                arParms); 
        }
        catch(DBApplicationException dbEx) 
        {
            BaseApplicationException bEx = new BaseApplicationException(dbEx.Message, dbEx);
            bEx.MethodName = System.Reflection.Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().FullName + "::" + System.Reflection.MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod().Name.ToString();
            bEx.Severity = ExceptionSeverityLevel;
            PublishingManager.Publish(bEx,"");
            throw bEx;
        }
        catch(Exception e) 
        {
            BaseApplicationException bEx = new BaseApplicationException(e.Message);
            bEx.MethodName = System.Reflection.Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().FullName + "::" + System.Reflection.MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod().Name.ToString();
            bEx.Severity = ExceptionSeverityLevel;
            PublishingManager.Publish(bEx,"");
            throw bEx;
        }
        return ds;
    }
share|improve this question
    
From your question: I only want to find the entire catch block that doesn't contain the inner exception -- Can you clarify this, please? I don't understand what you're trying to do. –  Justin Morgan May 2 '12 at 15:32
    
And what is the problem? –  JotaBe May 2 '12 at 15:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This works against your example:

catch\((([^)]|\n|\r)*)\)\s*{(([^}]|\n|\r)*?)Exception\(([^,](?!\n))+?\);(([^}]|\n|\r)*)}

But I agree that it's not a maintainable way of tackling this - unless that's a one-off check.

share|improve this answer
    
this is working fairly well right now. I must have some slightly different scenarios than my example above because this found some instances where the inner exception was already defined, but oh well. Right now my regex search is chugging along but it might have froze up. Granted it needs to search through roughly 5 million lines of code....which probably isn't easy. Also, see my response to Justin Morgan about the 1 off check...yes, I'm just adding in the inner exception manually for all of these occurrences. I'll probably never do anything like this again. –  ganders May 2 '12 at 17:25

If I understand what you're trying to do, this is going to be extremely difficult. The main reason is that you're trying to return the entire catch block, which means you have to (at least partially) parse the C#. This is because catch blocks are denoted by {...} structures, and they can have other {...} blocks nested inside them:

catch (Exception e)
{
    if (condition)
    {
        doSomething();
    }    
}

For a regex to identify the end of the catch block, it has to balance the { and } symbols to make sure they match. This is possible in .NET regex with balancing groups, but it's going to be more complicated than you bargained for.

I also notice that your regex is extremely permissive. You've used (.|\n|\r) where you don't really want to match every character, and all your quantifiers are greedy. This bit here...

{((.|\n|\r)*)Exception\(((?!,).)+\);((.|\n|\r)*)}

...will actually match everything between the first instance of the word catch until the last } in the file, as long as it finds something like Exception(blah) anywhere. In fact, blah could be anything without a comma in it, even another statement. Exception(); DoStuff(); would theoretically match it!

Your best option, IMO, is to use Visual Studio's Find Usages feature on your BaseApplicationException class. You could find all usages of the entire class, then perhaps compare that to all usages of BaseApplicationException.InnerException. If you must use a regex, this should at least get 99% of catch blocks without nested {...} blocks (expanded for clarity):

^\s*                          #Beginning of a line, possibly followed by whitespace
catch[\s\n]*                  #catch, possibly followed by whitespace
\(\w*Exception\s+\w+\)[\s\n]* #Some type of Exception declaration, possibly followed by whitespace
\{                            #An opening brace
(:?(?!\.InnerException)[^}])* #Anything except a closing brace, without the term `.InnerException` appearing anywhere
\}                            #The closing brace of the block

As I mentioned above, this will choke on nested {...} blocks. You can solve that with balancing groups, but I wanted to keep this simple.

share|improve this answer
    
fantastic reply! I never thought about nested braces inside my catch block (and I know they occur in my code). I guess for my scenario, I will ignore that that possibility will occur. The whole purpose in this is so I can just go to the exact line of code that contains the "new BaseApplicationException("blah")" and change it to "new BaseApplicationException("blah", exception)" so I can retain the inner exception as it bubbles up. I'm now going to research more about the "Find Usages" because I didn't know that was in VS. THANKS! –  ganders May 2 '12 at 17:23
    
@ganders - That sounds like a clear job for the "Find Usages" tool. If you use that on the one-parameter constructor of BaseApplicationException, you can find every case where it's used in your code. Even if you don't have the source code for it, you can just stick new BaseApplicationException("blah") into your code somewhere and use Find Usages on it. –  Justin Morgan May 2 '12 at 18:02

Sounds fiendishly difficult and hard to maintain. Can you enforce in your project that BaseApplicationException is only thrown as a "wrapper" exception? Then you can remove the constructor that takes just a string, and test the inner exception for null in the one remaining constructor.

share|improve this answer
    
I could do this, but there are many scenarios where there's an if check for a certain value, and if it's not there, it will do a "throw new BaseApplicationException("Value x is needed to do blah.") I guess I could throw a regular exception, or create a different type of inherited exception... –  ganders May 2 '12 at 17:27

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