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Firstly, I don't need to 100% prevent the deadlocks, but anything I can do to reduce them would be nice.

I have two tables Source and Dest. Source has a load of unique values in them, I need to request a new value from Source and in doing so, move it into Dest.

I have the following sql:

begin tran
    declare @value
    select top 1 @value = [value] from [source]
    delete from [Source] where [value]=@value
    insert into [Dest] ([Value]) values (@value)
    select @value
commit tran

this occasionally throws deadlocks when multiple users get the same value row. How can I prevent/reduce this?

Im using SQL Server 2008

As an aside, there are other columns in Source and Dest that I am reading from/writing to. This is a simplification for brevity.

Thanks

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1  
"when multiple users get the same value row" - your root problem is not the one you are asking about...What isolation level are you running under? –  Mitch Wheat May 2 '12 at 15:35
    
the default, so i assume thats READ COMMITTED –  Andrew Bullock May 2 '12 at 15:46

2 Answers 2

You can avoid this race condition by using the OUTPUT clause your the DELETE command, since it will delete the value from source and return it in a single atomic operation. I made the following script to demonstrate the concept:

-- dummy data
CREATE TABLE #source (mycolumn INT);
CREATE TABLE #destination (mycolumn INT);

INSERT #source VALUES (1);
INSERT #source VALUES (2);
INSERT #source VALUES (3);
GO

-- stored procedure to demonstrate concept
CREATE PROCEDURE move
AS BEGIN
    BEGIN TRANSACTION;

    DECLARE @tmp TABLE (mycolumn INT);
    DELETE TOP(1) #source OUTPUT DELETED.mycolumn INTO @tmp(mycolumn);

    INSERT #destination (mycolumn) OUTPUT INSERTED.mycolumn
    SELECT mycolumn
    FROM @tmp;

    COMMIT;
END
GO

-- testing
EXEC move;
GO -- remove from 1 from #source, insert 1 into #destination, returns 1

EXEC move;
GO -- remove from 2 from #source, insert 2 into #destination, returns 2

EXEC move;
GO -- remove from 3 from #source, insert 3 into #destination, returns 3
share|improve this answer
    
ha i just discovered OUTPUT - i was about to update my question to ask abouts its feasibility. +1 –  Andrew Bullock May 2 '12 at 17:01
    
so presumably the OUTPUT DELETE is atomic/causes a rowlock that will just cause a WAIT? –  Andrew Bullock May 2 '12 at 17:05
1  
In practical terms, this clause will not allow the same value to be returned from #source table more than once, thus avoiding the original race condition. I'm not sure how SQL Server internally implements its mechanisms, but it should not be important in this context though. –  Gerardo Lima May 2 '12 at 17:13
    
I tested this solution briefly and it still had problems; no time now will e-test later... –  Mitch Wheat May 3 '12 at 4:41
1  
Bu the way, since the DELETE ... OUTPUT statement avoids the race condition, If you can assume the INSERT command will always complete (i.e. you can guarantee all values to be inserted are valid), you could consider removing the TRANSACTION / COMMIT statements at all, thus reducing the process contention inside this block. –  Gerardo Lima May 3 '12 at 9:21

You could grab an XLOCK with the SELECT statement

begin tran
    declare @value
    select top 1 @value = [value] from [source] with (XLOCK)
    delete from [Source] where [value]=@value
    insert into [Dest] ([Value]) values (@value)
    select @value
commit tran
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