Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Sorry for how stupid this is going to sound. My JS vocabulary is terrible and I had absolutely no idea what to search for.

I'm using jQuery.

So I've got this code:

var example = {
    open: function(element){
       alert(element.text());
    },
    init: function(){
        $("a").click(example.open);
    }
};

$(document).ready(function(){example.init();)

So here's the problem: I want to pass an argument to example.open() when I click the "a" element. It doesn't seem like I can, though. In order for the example.open method to just…exist on page-load and not just run, it can't have parentheses. I think. So there's no way to pass it an argument.

So I guess my question is…how do you pass an argument to a function that can't have parentheses?

Thanks so much.

share|improve this question
    
is element the link or is it some other element? –  Lukas May 2 '12 at 16:54

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Insert another anonymous function:

var example = {
    open: function(element){
       alert(element.text());
    },
    init: function(){
        $("a").click(function()
        {
          example.open($(this));
        });
    }
};

You can also try this version because jQuery set the function's context (this) to the DOM element:

var example = {
    open: function(){
       alert($(this).text());
    },
    init: function(){
        $("button").click(example.open);
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
Oh, is that seriously it?! Can't believe I didn't just try that. Thanks so much, that was really helpful! –  Joe Lifrieri May 2 '12 at 16:51
    
@JoelFrieri I posted a even more simple version! And please accept my answer by clicking on the checkmark if you think that this is the best answer. –  ComFreek May 2 '12 at 17:17

Since jQuery binds the HTML element that raised the event into the this variable, you just have to pass it as a regular parameter:

var example = {
    open: function(element){
       alert(element.text());
    },
    init: function(){
        $("a").click(function() {
            // jQuery binds "this" to the element that initiated the event
            example.open(this);
        });
    }
}

$(document).ready(function(){example.init();)
share|improve this answer

You can pass the anchor through its own handler:

var example = {
    open: function( element ){
       alert(element.text());
    },
    init: function(){
      $("a").on("click", function() {
        example.open( $(this) );                           
      });
    }
};

$(document).ready(function() {
  example.init();
});
share|improve this answer

I don't understand what you actually want to do; however, I can give a try:

var example = {
open: function(event){
   event.preventDefault();
   alert($(event.target).text()+' : '+event.data.x);
},
init: function(){
    $("a").bind('click',{x:10},example.open);
}
};

$(example.init);

demo: http://jsfiddle.net/rahen/EM2g9/2/

share|improve this answer

Sorry, I misunderstood the question.


There are several ways to handle this:

  1. Wrap the call in a function:

    $('a').click( function(){ example.open( $(this) ) } );
    

    Where $(this) can be replaced by your argument list

  2. Call a different event creator function, which takes the arguments as a parameter:

    $('a').bind( 'click', {yourvariable:yourvalue}, example.open );
    

    Where open takes a parameter called event and you can access your variable through the event.data (in the above it'd be event.data.yourvariable)


Errors and Other Info


However your element.text() won't just work unless element is a jQuery object. So you can jQueryify the object before passing it to the function, or after it's received by the function:

  1. jQuery the passed object:

    function(){ example.open(this) } /* to */ function(){ example.open($(this)) }
    
  2. jQuery the received object:

    alert(element.text());           /* to */ alert($(element).text());
    

That said, when calling an object without parameters this will refer to the object in scope (that generated the event). So, really, if you don't need to pass extra parameters you can get away with something like:

var example = {
    open: function(){           // no argument needed
       alert($(this).text());   // this points to element being clicked
    },
    init: function(){
       $("a").click(example.open);
    }
};

$(document).ready(function(){
   example.init();
});                             // your ready function was missing closing brace '}'
share|improve this answer
    
Please post the reason for the downvote :) –  vol7ron May 2 '12 at 16:54
    
He's not asking how to get text from the element. He's asking how to pass arguments to the click responder. –  Lukas May 2 '12 at 16:55
    
Lukas: ahhh, you're right, I was wrong. Thanks, updated. –  vol7ron May 2 '12 at 20:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.