Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm looking form a programatic way to take an integer sequence and spit out a closed form function. Something like:

Given: 1,3,6,10,15

Return: n(n+1)/2

Samples could be useful; the language is unimportant.

share|improve this question
    
It may just be a lack of mathematical knowledge but this problem doesn't seem bounded enough. –  Brian Jun 25 '09 at 1:56
    
Suggestion for bounds: find a closed form function given exactly 10 integers, if possible, else return null. Unfortunately something like that oversimplifies this problem to a great extent. So much so that it almost becomes worthless. –  Sev Jun 25 '09 at 2:30
    
My main concern was that I was over-thinking the problem, and that there was some well known way to go about it. Turns out that's not the case, and in fact I'll need considerably more thought than I've already invested –  wkf Jun 25 '09 at 2:33
add comment

6 Answers

up vote 16 down vote accepted

This touches an extremely deep, sophisticated and active area of mathematics. The solution is damn near trivial in some cases (linear recurrences) and damn near impossible in others (think 2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, ....) You could start by looking at generating functions for example and looking at Herb Wilf's incredible book (cf. page 1 (2e)) on the subject but that will only get you so far.

But I think your best bet is to give up, query Sloane's comprehensive Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences when you need to know the answer, and instead spend your time reading the opinions of one of the most eccentric personalities in this deep subject.

Anyone who tells you this problem is solvable is selling you snake oil (cf. page 118 of the Wilf book (2e).)

share|improve this answer
    
Some fantastic links; exactly what I was looking for. I had a feeling the answer would be complicated. I think perhaps I need more knowledge of the subject matter before I can ask the right questions. Thanks! –  wkf Jun 25 '09 at 2:25
    
Waugh, I took too long texifying my solution. You beat me by a mile :) –  ephemient Jun 25 '09 at 2:43
4  
You might also want to look at the book "Concrete Mathematics." You may find it more accessible than Wilf's book. –  John D. Cook Jun 25 '09 at 2:54
    
The problem I have with this answer is that it implicitly assumes that there is one correct function, when in fact there are an infinite number of closed form functions that go through any specified finite set of points -- as just 1 example, a degree-n polynomial will go through any n+1 given points. But the bigger problem is: there is no way to choose which function of these functions is "best". Why? One reason is because the next number in the sequence could be anything. I'm -1ing until you mention this up front. –  j_random_hacker Jun 26 '09 at 11:24
add comment

There is no one function in general.

For the sequence you specified, The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences finds 133 matches in its database of interesting integer sequences. I've copied the first 5 here.

A000217 Triangular numbers: a(n) = C(n+1,2) = n(n+1)/2 = 0+1+2+...+n.
0, 1, 3, 6, 10, 15, 21, 28, 36, 45, 55, 66, 78, 91, 105, 120, 136, 153, 171, 190, 210, 231, 253, 276, 300, 325, 351, 378, 406, 435, 465, 496, 528, 561, 595, 630, 666, 703, 741, 780, 820, 861, 903, 946, 990, 1035, 1081, 1128, 1176, 1225, 1275, 1326, 1378, 1431

A130484 Sum {0<=k<=n, k mod 6} (Partial sums of A010875).
0, 1, 3, 6, 10, 15, 15, 16, 18, 21, 25, 30, 30, 31, 33, 36, 40, 45, 45, 46, 48, 51, 55, 60, 60, 61, 63, 66, 70, 75, 75, 76, 78, 81, 85, 90, 90, 91, 93, 96, 100, 105, 105, 106, 108, 111, 115, 120, 120, 121, 123, 126, 130, 135, 135, 136, 138, 141, 145, 150, 150, 151, 153

A130485 Sum {0<=k<=n, k mod 7} (Partial sums of A010876).
0, 1, 3, 6, 10, 15, 21, 21, 22, 24, 27, 31, 36, 42, 42, 43, 45, 48, 52, 57, 63, 63, 64, 66, 69, 73, 78, 84, 84, 85, 87, 90, 94, 99, 105, 105, 106, 108, 111, 115, 120, 126, 126, 127, 129, 132, 136, 141, 147, 147, 148, 150, 153, 157, 162, 168, 168, 169, 171, 174, 178, 183

A104619 Write the natural numbers in base 16 in a triangle with k digits in the k-th row, as shown below. Sequence gives the leading diagonal.
1, 3, 6, 10, 15, 2, 1, 1, 14, 3, 2, 2, 5, 12, 4, 4, 4, 13, 6, 7, 11, 6, 9, 9, 10, 7, 12, 13, 1, 0, 1, 10, 5, 1, 12, 8, 1, 1, 14, 1, 9, 7, 1, 4, 3, 1, 2, 2, 1, 3, 4, 2, 7, 9, 2, 14, 1, 2, 8, 12, 2, 5, 10, 3, 5, 11, 3, 8, 15, 3, 14, 6, 3, 7, 0, 4, 3, 13, 4, 2, 13, 4, 4, 0, 5, 9, 6, 5, 1, 15, 5, 12, 11, 6

A037123 a(n) = a(n-1) + Sum of digits of n.
0, 1, 3, 6, 10, 15, 21, 28, 36, 45, 46, 48, 51, 55, 60, 66, 73, 81, 90, 100, 102, 105, 109, 114, 120, 127, 135, 144, 154, 165, 168, 172, 177, 183, 190, 198, 207, 217, 228, 240, 244, 249, 255, 262, 270, 279, 289, 300, 312, 325, 330, 336, 343, 351, 360, 370, 381

If you restrict yourself to polynomial functions, this is easy to code up, and only mildly tedious to solve by hand.

Let f(x)=a_0+a_1x+a_2x^2+\cdots+a_{n-1}x^{n-1}+a_nx^n, for some unknown a_0\ldots a_n

Now solve the equations
y_0=f(0)=a_0
y_1=f(1)=a_0+a_1+a_2+\cdots+a_{n-1}+a_n
y_2=f(2)=a_0+2a_1+4a_2+\cdots+2^{n-1}a_{n-1}+2^na_n

y_n=f(n)=a_0+na_1+n^2a_2+\cdots+n^{n-1}a_{n-1}+n^na_n
which simply a system of linear equations.

share|improve this answer
    
You gave an example algorithm, while the "correct" answer asserted that no such algorithm exists. Interesting. Your answer assumes that the sequence is finite, which I think is a correct assumption. –  Martin Hock Jun 25 '09 at 4:02
1  
@Martin: ephemient clearly stated that the solution state was restricted to polynomials of degree n, which can always be fit to a finite set of n points. –  Autoplectic Jun 25 '09 at 7:08
1  
Small correction: a polynomial of degree n can always be fit to a finite set of n+1 points. –  ephemient Jun 25 '09 at 20:57
    
+1. This should be the correct answer IHMO. The most important point to make is that the problem is sorely underconstrained, and I think the list of 5 different plausible functions for 1, 3, 6, 10, 15 you gave demonstrates that quite nicely. –  j_random_hacker Jun 26 '09 at 11:29
add comment

If your data is guaranteed to be expressible as a polynomial, I think you would be able to use R (or any suite that offers regression fitting of data). If your correlation is exactly 1, then the line is a perfect fit to describe the series.

There's a lot of statistics that goes into regression analysis, and I am not familiar enough with even the basics of calculation to give you much detail.

But, this link to regression analysis in R might be of assistance

share|improve this answer
    
You could form the polynomial by taking all of the roots given, say a, b and c, and write it in the form f(x) = (x-a)*(x-b)*(x-c). But that doesn't mean that they are not other polynomials that would satisfy it. –  sharth Jun 25 '09 at 2:07
add comment

I think your problem is ill-posed. Given any finite number of integers in a sequence with no generating function, the next element can be anything.

You need to assume something about the sequence. Is it geometric? Arithmetic?

share|improve this answer
    
All kinds of sequences. Maybe a 'sequence' is given where there isn't a generating function. I'd like to be able to handle that case as well. I'm at square one right now, so if you think there is some way I should re-factor the question, I'd appreciate your input. –  wkf Jun 25 '09 at 2:18
add comment

If your sequence comes from a polynomial then divided differences will find that polynomial expressed in terms of the Newton basis or binomial basis. See this.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The Axiom computer algebra system includes a package for this purpose. You can read its documentation here.

Here's the output for your example sequence in FriCAS (a fork of Axiom):

(3) -> guess([1, 3, 6, 10, 15])

                 2
                n  + 3n + 2
(3)  [[function= -----------,order= 0]]
                     2
Type: List(Record(function: Expression(Integer),order: NonNegativeInteger))
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.