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I'm having trouble declaring a const field in an abstract class. Why is this?

edit

I should have clarified. My problem is that my child classes can't see the const field:

protected const string Prefix = "dynfrm_";

If I remove the const keyword, I can get to it from a grandchild class.

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Given which answer directed you to the solution, you should have shown quite a bit more code. If we had actually seen your code, it would have been clear. –  Dustin Campbell Jun 25 '09 at 2:12
    
That's why I asked for the error message :) –  KevDog Jun 25 '09 at 2:34

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

As long as you initialize it in the declaration, there shouldn't be an issue. What is the error message you are receiving?

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Error message? That's brilliant! "cannot be accessed with an instance reference; qualify it with a type name instead." I did this and it works. I guess it treats it as static when you use the const keyword. –  Ronnie Overby Jun 25 '09 at 2:08
    
I was trying to access using this.Field. –  Ronnie Overby Jun 25 '09 at 2:13

Here you go...

  abstract class MyBase
    {
        protected const int X = 10;
    }
    class Derived : MyBase
    {
        Derived()
        {
            Console.WriteLine(MyBase.X);
        }
    }
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MyBase is just base in c#. Besides, base.myConstFiled isn't working for me. –  Ronnie Overby Jun 25 '09 at 2:12
1  
base is a c# keyword for the base class of the current class. MyBase is what Gishu declared as the abstract class in his sample code. –  Timothy Carter Jun 25 '09 at 2:19
    
Oh I see. Thanks. –  Ronnie Overby Jun 25 '09 at 2:34
    
@yshuditelu - Thank you for clarifying that bit –  Gishu Jun 25 '09 at 4:00
public abstract class Class1
        {
            protected const string Prefix = "dynfrm_";
        }

        public class Class2 : Class1
        {
            public void GetConst()
            {
                Console.WriteLine(Prefix);
            }
        }
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Seems to work fine:

public abstract class Class1
{
    protected const int Field1 = 1;
}

public class Class2 : Class1
{
    public int M1()
    {
        return Field1;
    }
}

I'm using Visual Studio 2008 SP1, and I see the protected const in IntelliSense from a descendant and it compiles as expected.

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Did you make your constant at least protected? if it's private it won't be accessible by child classes just as it wouldn't if it wasn't an abstract class.

Edit: I see you posted an example - and did specify it as protected, which works for me. Got a description of what happens? Doesn't compile? run time error?

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If a class is defined as abstact then it can never be initialized. Wouldn't this stop the compiler from initializing a const, which is inherently static? –  Brownman98 Jun 25 '09 at 3:09

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