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Assuming I have 3 tables:

People
-------------
PID   |  NAME
-------------
1       Bob
2       Garry
3       Alex
4       Peter
5       Victor

Tasks
-------------
TID   |  TASK
-------------
1       Work
2       Work Hard
3       Work Harder

And table that assigns tasks to people

Assigns
-------------
PID   |  TID
-------------
1       2
2       1
4       3

Question: How do I select People who were not assigned to any task?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The LEFT JOIN approach will work, but here are two more approaches that you might find easier to read:

1. NOT IN

SELECT NAME
FROM People
WHERE PID NOT IN
(
    SELECT PID
    FROM Assigns
)

2. NOT EXISTS

SELECT NAME
FROM People
WHERE NOT EXISTS
(
    SELECT *
    FROM Assigns
    WHERE People.PID = Assigns.PID
)

Result

Alex
Victor

Related

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And what is your feeling about a LEFT JOIN IS NULL approach? –  Adriaan Stander May 2 '12 at 17:50
    
Works just fine Thanks! –  Sergej Popov May 2 '12 at 17:53
    
Yes, @Sergej Popov, this should work fine, but the performance might be an issue. –  Adriaan Stander May 2 '12 at 17:55
    
@astander, thanks I will consider this for future, but for my level its much easier to understand this. and performance is not a major issue for my current task. –  Sergej Popov May 2 '12 at 18:02
    
Glad you got the answer you were looking for. X-) –  Adriaan Stander May 2 '12 at 18:07

Using NOT IN subselects can be a harder performance hit than LEFT-JOIN and expecting NULL

SELECT NAME
   FROM People
      LEFT JOIN Assigns
         on People.PID = Assigns.PID
   where
      Assigns.PID IS NULL

By using the LEFT-JOIN approach, the People table is going through ONCE with a join to the second based on index find. It doesn't actually query the entire second "Assigns" file for all possibilities to then join against (and not necessarily take advantage of an index). The left-join utilizes the index directly and either finds a record or it doesn't. If it doesn't, the PID will be NULL thus indicating the person is NOT found in the assigns table.

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2  
I wouldn't be surprised if Oracle chose the same execution plan for the NOT IN solution and LEFT JOIN solution –  a_horse_with_no_name May 2 '12 at 17:59

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