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I'm having trouble parallelising a nested for loop. The code looks something like this

  for( k = 0; k < m; k++ ) {
    for( i = 0; i < k; i++ ) {
      s = 0.0;
#pragma omp parallel for default(none) shared(i, k, q, m, n) private(j) reduction(+:s)
      for( j = 0; j < n; j++ ) {
        s += q[ i ][ j ] * q[ k ][ j ];
      }
    }
  }

This code works but runs very slow due to the overhead when creating and destroying threads many times under the 'k' and the 'i' loop.

Ideally I want something like this

#pragma omp parallel default(none) shared(i, k, q, m, n, s) private(j)
  for( k = 0; k < m; k++ ) {
    for( i = 0; i < k; i++ ) {
      s = 0.0;
#pragma omp for reduction(+:s)
      for( j = 0; j < n; j++ ) {
        s += q[ i ][ j ] * q[ k ][ j ];
      }
    }
  }

Where the parallel region is created only once. However, I'm getting incorrect results. I think this is because the variable 's' is shared.

Is there a way to have 's' shared and still perform a reduction?

Thanks!

P.S. I can't parallelise the 'k' or 'i' loop because they depend on previous iterations.

share|improve this question
    
If it's only the inner loop that's parallelizable, then you are not likely to any speedup from parallelizing it. There is too little computation, and if n is big, it will be memory bound. –  Mysticial May 2 '12 at 17:50
    
Have you tried reordering your loops? In your code snipped the loop over j can be put first, before loops over k and i. Having done that, the value of q[k][j] becomes a constant for the loop over i, hence you safely pull it out of that loop. –  ev-br May 2 '12 at 18:06
    
Hm, I don't see what can't work here. You are resetting s at each i-iteration? –  Jens Gustedt May 2 '12 at 18:09

1 Answer 1

Is it just me or is there a part of the code in the loop for i that you have omitted? Since that code just computes many dot products but at the end only the dot product of q[m-1][] and q[m-2][] is stored in s. Also as given, your code has no data dependencies between loops iterations but would rather exhibit load imbalance if you parallelise the other loop using static scheduling. You can somewhat counter that using dynamic scheduling:

#pragma omp parallel default(none) shared(q, m, n) \
            private(i, k, j) lastprivate(s) schedule(dynamic,1)
for( k = 0; k < m; k++ ) {
  for( i = 0; i < k; i++ ) {
    s = 0.0;
    for( j = 0; j < n; j++ ) {
      s += q[ i ][ j ] * q[ k ][ j ];
    }
  }
}

You can also try to use OpenMP tasks if your compiler supports version 3.0 or higher of the standard.

@Zhenya, if the j-loop is the outermost then the benefits of caching will be lost since q[i][j] and q[i+1][j] are not be adjacent in memory in C/C++.

share|improve this answer
    
What is the difference between schedule(dynamic,1) and schedule(guided)? –  Azrael3000 May 4 '12 at 12:38
    
schedule(dynamic,1) means that each iteration is assigned to a currently idle thread. schedule(dynamic,10) means that blocks of 10 iterations are assigned. schedule(guided) works like dynamic but starts with larger blocks of iterations and then exponentially reduces the block size. Actually in that case guided might be the better scheduling option. –  Hristo Iliev May 4 '12 at 13:02

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