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I am trying to create a login with username or email

My code is:

$username=$_REQUEST['login'];
$email=$_REQUEST['login'];
$password=$_REQUEST['password'];

if($username && $password) {
  $query="select * from  user_db where username='$username'  and password='$password'";
} else if ($email && $password) {
  $query="select * from  user_db where email='$email' and password='$password'";
}

Login with username is success but login with email is not working. Please help me!

share|improve this question
    
$email=$_REQUEST['login']; is this really email? –  Aurimas Ličkus May 2 '12 at 17:59
    
yes i have email in the user_db table –  SureshKumar Vegesna May 2 '12 at 17:59
    
Check if $_REQUEST['login'] is set -- isset($_REQUEST['login']) and only set $username to that if it is set. –  dweiss May 2 '12 at 17:59

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The login parameter is the same for both email and username. Not exactly incorrect if you have a single login box that accepts either.

You could put the condition in the query itself if you're not sure if it's an email or username.

$login=$_REQUEST['login'];
$query = "select * from  user_db where ( username='$login' OR email = '$login') and password='$password'"
share|improve this answer

You are setting the same value to two variables, and then using an if/else. Both if statements are equivalent.

You need to figure out if $_REQUEST[login] contains a valid email address, and if so use the email field of the database. Otherwise, use the username field.

Also, you should not be putting variables directly into the query. Use prepared statements.

share|improve this answer
$username=$_REQUEST['login'];
$email=$_REQUEST['login'];

This is wrong, you are using $_REQUEST['login'] for both email and username. Why don't you just use email?

If $_REQUEST['login'] doesn't have email address, of course this wont return you anything.

Also, both of your if statements will always execute, unless the fields are empty. right?

Take the login out, enforce the users to login with email addresses. also, take md5 of the password. who stores raw passwords these days?

share|improve this answer
    
@ Darth Vader i would like to provide an option for user only with one parameter either to login with username or email –  SureshKumar Vegesna May 2 '12 at 18:03
$username=$_REQUEST['username'];//I'm assuming your code here was wrong
$email=$_REQUEST['email'];//and that you have three different fields in your form 
$password=$_REQUEST['password'];

if (validate_username($username)) {
  $query="select * from  user_db where username='".$username".' and password='".validate_password($password)."'";
} else if (validate_email($email)) {
  $query="select * from  user_db where email='".$email."' and password='".validate_password($password)."'";
}

//... elsewhere...

function validate_username(&$username) {
  if (strlen($username) <= 1) { return false; }
  //return false for other situations
    //Does the username have invalid characters?
    //Is the username a sql injection attack?
  //otherwise...
  return true;
}

function validate_email(&$email) {
  //same deal as with username
}

function validate_password(&$password) {
  //same deal as with username
}

Note, if you have only two fields (login and password), then the distinction between email and username is meaningless. Further note that you should really be using PHP PDO to construct and execute your queries, to prevent security breaches and make your life waaay easier.

share|improve this answer
if (validate_username($username)) {
  $query="select * from  user_db where username='".$username".' and password='".validate_password($password)."'";
} else if (validate_email($email)) {
  $query="select * from  user_db where email='".$email."' and password='".validate_password($password)."'";
}
share|improve this answer
    
What are the validate methods, you need to explain them. Besides you should not concat variables into queries. This is not secure. –  scriptmonster Nov 13 '13 at 9:20

Well i know this is an old post but i've found that some people are still going to view it so i wanted to put a easy way to allow both email and username on the same input

my code is as follows

  if
   (!preg_match("/^[_a-z0-9-]+(\.[_a-z0-9-]+)*@[a-z0-9-]+(\.[a-z0-9-]+)*(\.[a-z]{2,3})$/", $name_of_same_input) )
  {
     $un_check = mysql_query("SELECT uname FROM eusers WHERE uname = '' ") or die(mysql_error());

     echo "loging in with username"; //code
  }
  elseif
   (preg_match("/^[_a-z0-9-]+(\.[_a-z0-9-]+)*@[a-z0-9-]+(\.[a-z0-9-]+)*(\.[a-z]{2,3})$/", $name_of_same_input) )
  {
     $un_check = mysql_query("SELECT umail FROM eusers WHERE umail = '' ") or die(mysql_error());

     echo "loging in with email"; //code

  }
share|improve this answer

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