Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have searched a lot about regex and finally I found out that it's better to use "\\s+" for splitting a string
But amazingly it doesn't anything to the original String:

private static void process(String command) {
    command = command.substring(0, command.length() - 1);
    String[] splitted = command.split("\\s+");
    for (String str : splitted) {
        System.out.println(str);
    }
}  

sample input:

Boolean b = new Boolean(true);  

preferred output:

[Boolean,b,=,new,Boolean(true)]  

But my method output is :

Boolean b = new Boolean(true)
share|improve this question
3  
What's your question? What's your input, expected output and actual output for this method? –  Philipp Reichart May 2 '12 at 18:11
3  
Why the substring? –  Paul Vargas May 2 '12 at 18:12
1  
If you want parse arguments in the command line, check commons.apache.org/cli –  Paul Vargas May 2 '12 at 18:13
1  
@ Andrew Thompson : it will remove the last character, but my problem is not there! –  SAbbasizadeh May 2 '12 at 18:20
1  
-1 on the question. The code and sample output do not match up. That said @Tim Pote has given the answer you need. –  Tim Bender May 2 '12 at 18:34
show 7 more comments

1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you want that "preferred output" use Arrays.toString(splitted). Your code, however, works like it's supposed to. It prints each element of the array on a new line. So this code:

  private static void process(String command) {
    command = command.substring(0, command.length() - 1);

    String[] splitted = command.split("\\s+");

    for (String str : splitted) {
      System.out.println(str);
    }

    System.out.println(Arrays.toString(splitted).replace(" ", ""));
  }

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    process("Boolean b = new Boolean(true); ");
  }

Produces this output:

Boolean
b
=
new
Boolean(true);
[Boolean, b, =, new, Boolean(true);]

Note that the substring operation doesn't work like you want because of the trailing spaces in your input string. You can use command.trim() beforehand to get rid of any leading/trailing spaces.

Edit

I edited my code, because, as @Tim Bender says, there are spaces between array elements in the output of Arrays.toString and that's not exactly what the OP wanted.

share|improve this answer
    
I replaced exactly your method with the one that I said, but the output was not what you said! –  SAbbasizadeh May 2 '12 at 18:58
    
Add my main method to that class, run it, and tell me what you get. –  Tim Pote May 2 '12 at 19:03
    
yes; You are right. But why it doesn't work with my main? –  SAbbasizadeh May 2 '12 at 19:07
    
You probably should have posted your main (or at least the relevant part of it) to begin with. We knew all along that your sample input and output were off. Go ahead and post it and I'll take a look. –  Tim Pote May 2 '12 at 19:10
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.