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In busy making a short game. I have to move a man in a 2d array block by block. The thing is I know how to move it but only one block away from the original BLOCK. I want to know how do i save the position which in in at the moment in the array.

void DisplayBoard(char** array,int row,int col,char direction){

int NewRow(0),NewCol(1);//I believe my problem is here. 


if(direction =='a')
{
    NewCol--;
}
if(direction =='s')
{
    NewRow++;
}
if(direction == 'd')
{
    NewCol++;
}
if(direction == 'w')
{
    NewRow--;
}

array[0][1] = EMPTY;
array[NewRow][NewCol] = MAN;

 for(int i = 0;i < row ; i++){

    for(int c = 0; c < col; c++){

      cout << array[i][c]<<" ";
    }
      cout <<endl<<endl;
 }
}

I think my problem is in the part where i wive the new array a initial value. I want to save the block i'm in and move it eg.down and save that position and move it down from there.

How do i do that please help.

Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
This isn't much better than your original question. Do you want to save the location of the man in a variable (or a pair of variables)? –  Beta May 2 '12 at 19:25
    
Save the location of the man after every movement –  Peter_DLE May 2 '12 at 19:41
    
Do you mean that you want to save the whole history, not just the present location? (Also, we seem to have a language problem-- what is your native language? Maybe someone here can translate.) –  Beta May 2 '12 at 19:45
    
Afrikaans is and no just the current location after each movement. –  Peter_DLE May 2 '12 at 19:49
    
Just the Present location –  Peter_DLE May 2 '12 at 19:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A simple fix would be to move the NewCol and NewRow out of the method and thereby having their state not depend on the method call.

A better solution would be to create something like a new struct containing the array and the current location e.g. :

struct GameBoard {
   char **fields;
   int col;
   int row;
};

then take the GameBoard as input:

void DisplayBoard(Gameboard& board,int row,int col,char direction){
    int prevCol = board.col, prevRow = board.row;
    if(direction =='a')
    {
        board.col--;
    }
    if(direction =='s')
    {
         board.row++;
    }
    if(direction == 'd')
    {
         board.col++;
    }
    if(direction == 'w')
    {
         board.row--;
    }
    array[prevRow][prevCol] = EMPTY;
    array[board.row][board.col] = MAN;
    for(int i = 0;i < row ; i++){

        for(int c = 0; c < col; c++){

           cout << array[i][c]<<" ";
        }
        cout <<endl<<endl;
    }
}

Update As beta proposed one could do these things as member functions instead. I would also use std::vector instead of a two dimensional array because of the safety checks that there are. My final solution would thus be:

 class GameBoard {
       private:
       std::vector< std::vector<char> > _fields;
       int _col;
       int _row;
       public:
       GameBoard(int ncol, int nrow, int startcol, int startrow)
          : _col(startcol),  _row(startrow), _fields(nrow)  {
              for(int i = 0; i < nrow; i++) {
                   for (int j = 0; j < ncol; j++) {
                       _fields[i].push_back(EMPTY);
                   }
              }
              _fields[_row][_col] = MAN;
       }
       void move_man(char direction) {
             int prevCol = _col, prevRow = _row;
             switch(direction) {
                  case 'a': _col--; break;
                  case 'd': _col++; break;
                  case 'w': _row--; break;
                  case 's': _row++; break;
             }
             _fields[prevRow][prevCol] = EMPTY;
             _fields[_row][_col] = MAN; 
       }
       void display_board() {
             for (int i = 0; i < _fields.size(); i++) {
                  for (int j = 0; j < _fields[i].size(); j++) {
                      std::cout << _fields[i][j] << " ";
                  }
                  std::cout << std::endl;
             }
       }
  };
share|improve this answer
    
The next step would be to make this function a member of GameBoard, then split the display routine into a separate function. –  Beta May 2 '12 at 19:41
    
I just need to save the location of the man after every movement. –  Peter_DLE May 2 '12 at 19:44
    
@Beta Just update it to reflect the changes (thought I should not do too many) –  Yet Another Geek May 2 '12 at 20:09
    
Thanks for the help i got it working. –  Peter_DLE May 3 '12 at 11:53

A simple solution is to use static variables for your current block position. Static variables exist and maintain their values for the lifetime of the program. In your current implementation, NewRow and NewCol are automatic variables, meaning that they are de-allocated when the function completes and reallocated when the function is called. This will cause the values to be reset back to 0 and 1. Defining the current row variables statically is shown below:

static int NewRow(0), NewCol(1);

This will initialize the variables to 0 and 1, however, any updates or changes to these variables will persist even after the function ends.

share|improve this answer
    
Clever, but it means that the location of the man is stored primarily in this function, where nothing else has access to it. It's also stored in the array, kind of, but that can be changed by other functions without this function being any the wiser. –  Beta May 2 '12 at 19:38
1  
Completely agree, the solution is not a robust design, however, the intent was to solve his problem with as little code refactoring as possible. –  flukey May 2 '12 at 19:49

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