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In order to boot a Linux kernel on an embedded device I have to tag the kernel with a special header. The program used to tag the kernel is provided by the manufacture of the device as a 32-bit binary only. This is very annoying as I have to install hundreds of megabytes libraries on my 64-bit system only to tag a kernel with few bytes. This is how the kernel is tagged:

$./mkimage -f kernel.cfg -d zImage_without_header zImage

kernel.cfg:

##########################################################
#ENCINFO.CFG
# 
# information and command for encode the Linux zImage
##########################################################

# Magic number for the ImageHeader, use this to seach start of the Image Header
#
MAGIC_NUMBER 0x27051956

#operation system type
OS_TYPE  linux

#cpu architecture type
CPU_ARCH  arm

#image type
IMAGE_TYPE  kernel

#compress type
COMPRESS_TYPE   gzip

#
DATALOAD_ADDRESS   0x00008000

#
ENTRY_ADDRESS   0x00008000

#image name string
IMAGE_NAME   kernel.img 

#model name string
MODEL_NAME   DNS-313

# version string
VERSION  1.00b18

# mac address string
MAC_ADDRESS          FF-FF-FF-FF-FF-FF

#the beginning offset of writing header
START_OFFSET         0x00

#the end offset of writing header
END_OFFSET           0xFF

#whether overwrite
OVERWRITE            n

The mkimage binary is different from the mkimage that is available from e.g. the Debian repository, that one will not work for my device. I have tried to create a 1MB file and tagged it to display the header:

$dd if=/dev/zero bs=1k count=1024 of=zImage_without_header
$./mkimage -f kernel.cfg -d zImage_without_header zImage

output from last command:

Magic Number:   27051956
Image Name:   kernel.img
Created:      Wed May  2 17:40:43 2012
Image Type:   ARM Linux Kernel Image (gzip compressed)
Data Size:    1048576 Bytes = 1024.00 kB = 1.00 MB
Load Address: 0x00008000
Entry Point:  0x00008000
Model Name:   DNS-313
Version   :   1.00b18
Mac Address:  ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff  

$hexdump -C zImage

output from last command:

00000000  27 05 19 56 [2c 83 53 d5] 4f a1 [55 7b 00 10 00 00] |'..V,.S.O.U{....|
00000010  00 00 80 00 00 00 80 00  [a7 38 ea 1c] 05 02 02 01  |.........8......|
00000020  6b 65 72 6e 65 6c 2e 69  6d 67 00 00 00 00 00 00  |kernel.img......|
00000030  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |................|
00000040  44 4e 53 2d 33 31 33 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |DNS-313.........|
00000050  31 2e 30 30 62 31 38 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |1.00b18.........|
00000060  ff ff ff ff ff ff 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |................|
00000070  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |................|
*
00100060

The kernels should always be tagged with a header like the one above as I do not need to change anything. The the values enclosed in brackets [] seem to change when the filesize does, but I do not know how.

I think that the same thing could be accomplished with a small C program, but I am not sure where to start and how?

Any suggestions or ideas are welcome.

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2  
Request the source for mkimage from the manufacturer. While I suppose they can technically refuse, that would be a really bad idea on their part. –  Joshua May 2 '12 at 19:35
    
It seems quite likely that some or all of the varying values are checksums. You need to know what they are before you can create the header yourself. –  Kristof Provost May 2 '12 at 19:39
1  
4f a1 55 7b is a timestamp (May 2 @ 15:40:43 GMT). Two of the "unknowns" are checksums. If your bootloader is u-boot, these should be the fields: linux-m32r.org/public/codefestweek2008/takata/qemu-0.9.1/html/… –  indiv May 14 '12 at 18:21

1 Answer 1

It might be a long shot, but if you do not have access to the "mkimage" source code, you can try disassembling it with objdump and try to figure out what is going on :

$ objdump -d ./mkimage
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