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I want to write a database wrapper that can operate different types of databases (e.g. sqlite, postgres, etc.), so the code that users are writing does not change regardless of what database they actually are using.

In my head, this calls for an abstract base class like:

class database {
public:
    virtual bool query(const std::string &q) = 0;
    // Other stuff
};

class sqlite : public database {
public:
    bool query(const std::string &q) {
        // Implementation
    }
};

This looks good, but I am using variadic templates for escaping arguments inside queries (and I really like this idea, so I would want to hang on to it!), so unfortunately my base class rather looks like:

class database {
public:
    template <typename... Args>
    bool query(const std::string &q, const Args &... args) {
        // Implementation
    }
};

This stands in the way of creating an abstract class however, because templated functions cannot be virtual. The only thing I came up with so far is this construct

template <class DatabaseType>
class database {
public:
    template <typename... Args>
    bool query(const std::string &q, const Args &... args) {
        return database_.query(q, args...);
    }
private:
    DatabaseType database_;
};

While this seems to work, with all the wrappers that do nothing but call the identically named database_ functions it does not look like a very good style to me. Is this the design pattern of choice here, or is there a cleaner, or more idiomatic way?

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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can build a query object out of the arguments to the query function, and pass it to a virtual query_impl function.

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I've been thinking a lot about this, but I haven't yet figured out how this should work. If I see this correctly, I will still have a templated object (query), and thus I will not be able to do something like virtual bool query_impl(const query &q) = 0;, because I cannot use the object without an argument list. Would you mind giving an example snippet of what you mean? –  nijansen May 2 '12 at 21:21
1  
@nijansen: The thing is that you can use the template to provide a simple to use interface, that then builds the query object. Consider for a simple approach that you could be passing just the query string and a std::vector<boost::any>. Creating that structure with the parameters in user code could be cumbersome, so they just use the variadic template function, that in turn stores the elements in the container and passes them down to a virtual function that has a fixed signature: void query_impl( std::string, std::vector<boost::any> ). –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 2 '12 at 21:25
2  
... I would actually not use boost::any, but boost::variant<> as it is a bit more explicit in that you do not accept anything but say, int, double, string... But the idea is the same, use the template with full type information to perform type-erasure (in this case also argument-list-length erasure) and forward it to a single virtual function that can then be implemented for every specific database. (Note, I seem to be one of the only two people that think this is a solution, and that the CRTP approach is useless) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 2 '12 at 21:28
    
@David : Three. ;-] –  ildjarn May 2 '12 at 21:33
    
Thank you for clearing this up for me. I actually don't see the benefit CRTP would provide neither, so this will be way I'll do it. –  nijansen May 2 '12 at 21:34
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[...] is there a cleaner, or more idiomatic way

You may want to look up CRTP to achieve polymorphic behavior with templates.

template <class concrete_db> 
struct abstract_db { 
    template <typename... Args>
    void query(std::string const& q, Args const&... args) { 
        static_cast<concrete_db *>(this)->query(q, args...);
    }
};

struct postgres_db : abstract_db<postgres_db> {
    template <typename... Args>
    void query(std::string const& q, Args const&... args) { 
         // do something
    }
};
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What exactly does this provide you with? abstract_db<postgres_db> is unrelated to abstract_db<mysql_db>, which means that abstract_db cannot really be used polymorphically, can it? That is, if you hold a reference to abstract_db<postgres_db> and you call the query method, it will correctly be dispatched to postgres_db, but are you not trading one particular type postgres_db for another abstract_db<postgres_db>? What am I missing? –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 2 '12 at 20:15
    
@David : Anything that holds or functions on a abstract_db<> must be turned into a template -- trading dynamic polymorphism for static polymorphism. –  ildjarn May 2 '12 at 20:22
    
@ildjarn: If that is an answer to my comment, then the question stands, why do you need to use CRTP at all? if the functions are templates they can directly work with postgres_db, why do you need to add an extra level of complexity with abstract_db<postgres_db>? Note that I understand CRTP, but I don't think that this answer makes sense: it adds more code, an extra base and offers no improvement over just not using it. Definetly I am downvoting :) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 2 '12 at 20:25
    
@David : Ah, fair point. –  ildjarn May 2 '12 at 20:26
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas: The OP was already there with his draft version. Note the quote. Also, query is presumably not the only function that would be there in abstract_db! I don't see an extra level of complexity -- even with dynamic polymorphism an abstract base class would still be there. Further with empty base optimization you wouldn't even notice the base was there. CRTP will require one static function call, not a virtual and will possibly be faster. It is also easier to put in checks/policies with the CRTP version, so given a choice I'd stick to CRTP. –  dirkgently May 3 '12 at 7:04
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