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I want to remove (uncommnet #) wheel group in /etc/sudoers file so what would be the Regex pattern i should use?

#cat /etc/sudoers
....
....
## Allows members of the 'sys' group to run networking, software,
## service management apps and more.
# %sys ALL = NETWORKING, SOFTWARE, SERVICES, STORAGE, DELEGATING, PROCESSES, LOCATE, DRIVERS

## Allows people in group wheel to run all commands
# %wheel        ALL=(ALL)       ALL

## Same thing without a password
# %wheel  ALL=(ALL)       NOPASSWD: ALL

....
....

I want to remove # from following line.

...
# %wheel  ALL=(ALL)       NOPASSWD: ALL
...
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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You shouldn't edit the /etc/sudoers file with any sort of script. There's a reason for the visudo command. Edits to the sudoers file should be rare and well-controlled.

That being said, if your editor for the visudo command is vi, you can run something like :%s/^# %wheel/%wheel/ to uncomment all of the lines what start with %wheel.

Or, if you reeeeeeally think it's necessary:

sudo sed --in-place 's/^#\s*\(%wheel\s\+ALL=(ALL)\s\+NOPASSWD:\s\+ALL\)/\1/' /etc/sudoers

Run it without the --in-place first to check the output. Use it at your own risk.

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I knew! but we have bulk installation and i cant do that by hand. Its just single line edit that's why i am not worried. –  Satish May 2 '12 at 20:01
    
Voila! There you go!!! You got it. It works! –  Satish May 2 '12 at 20:21
    
what is \s* means? I believe white space.. –  Satish May 2 '12 at 20:23
    
Yeah \s* means "zero or more whitespace. \s\+ means "one or more whitespace" –  Tim Pote May 2 '12 at 20:38

The following should work:

sed -i 's/^#\s*\(%wheel\s*ALL=(ALL)\s*NOPASSWD:\s*ALL\)/\1/' /etc/sudoers
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