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I find our system hitting the throttling wall under nominal loads, say 120 inserts per second per instance. There are other concurrent processes running, which we are offloading/optimizing, etc. What I want to know is this: does anyone have any insights into the level of impact that the presence of indexes has on throttling? I have a few performance issues elsewhere in the system where the presence of an index would help, but I hesitate to add them because of their additional CPU and I/O loads!

Any real-world advice here would be welcome. Please keep it SQL Azure specific.

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Would you mind providing a bit more information around your throttling wall? You mentioned 120 inserts per second per instance. Does this mean you're going beyond 120 total inserts per second across multiple instances? Where are you topping out overall? Also, what size compute instances are you using? –  David Makogon May 3 '12 at 20:56
    
Also: How many threads are processing your inserts? If it's single-threaded, the insert rate might be limited by the serial nature of the inserts. –  David Makogon May 3 '12 at 21:54
    
We were stress testing the system under load. This configuration is not sharded. I am trying to learn the load limits for a single SQL Azure instance. As for the front-end, this configuration has 2 extra mall web roles. It's all throttling-related on SQL Server. The web role instance size is not critical here, IMO. We stress tested with as many as 300 concurrent requests. Now we are measuring to see how much more performance may be squeezed out of the SQL Azure instance, with strategies like narrowing tables, removing indexes/constraints, providing defaults for clustering keys, etc. –  Pittsburgh DBA May 5 '12 at 22:04
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When it comes to indexing you of course need to evaluate the tradeoff of overhead vs. performance improvements of your queries. What will hurt you the most are indexes that are not being used, because the overhead of maintaining an index falls in the category of what gets throttled.

If you add an index, can you get rid of another one that is now obsolete? Are your queries consuming fewer throttled resources (I/O, Memory, CPU) as a result of adding an index?

Also note that CPU is no longer throttled in a hard fashion (like I/O or Memory); queries will execute slower, but they will execute.

In the end, I have rarely seen indexes being a significant cause of throttling, except perhaps at the time of the creation of an index (or refresh). Nevertheless, common sense applies in SQL Azure like in SQL Server: creating indexes that are not too wide, and making sure the indexes reduce existing query resource consumption.

Using the DMVs can help you determine if your overall resource consumption is dropping.

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It was very good to point out the chance of saving I/O, Memory, and CPU by adding an index. I like the reminder to consider ALL effects of a decision. –  Pittsburgh DBA May 5 '12 at 22:06
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Throttling is basically just caps on CPU, memory and disk usage. So an index's impact on throttling boils down to it's impact on those resources. So really this is just like any other performance tuning scenario - figure out which limit you're hitting, and determine how to use less of it.

SQL Azure is different than SQL Server primarily because you don't get access to all the of the cool DMVs. You do still get some, but not all of them. The one advantage you do get is that if you're getting throttling errors, they should tell you what resource you're being throttled on.

The following queries may be helpful, depending on your situation. I stole these from Glenn Berry, my only contribution is figuring out that they run on Azure. He's also got a lot of great advice for SQL performance work, though he concentrates on non-Azure installations.

--List query plans and stats ordered by last execution time
SELECT TOP(50) q.text, s.last_execution_time, s.execution_count, s.total_worker_time, 
        s.max_elapsed_time, s.max_worker_time,  (s.total_worker_time / s.execution_count) AS AverageExecutionTime,
        s.max_physical_reads, s.max_logical_reads, 
        s.max_logical_writes, s.min_rows, s.max_rows
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats as s
      cross apply sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) AS q
ORDER BY s.last_execution_time DESC


--List query plans and stats ordered by average execution time
SELECT TOP(50) q.text, s.last_execution_time, s.execution_count, s.total_worker_time, 
        s.max_elapsed_time, s.max_worker_time, (s.total_worker_time / s.execution_count) AS AverageExecutionTime,
        s.max_physical_reads, s.max_logical_reads, 
        s.max_logical_writes, s.min_rows, s.max_rows
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats as s
      cross apply sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) AS q
ORDER BY [AverageExecutionTime] DESC

--Get 50 most I/O intensive queries
SELECT TOP(50) OBJECT_NAME(qt.objectid) AS [SP Name],
qs.total_logical_writes,
qs.total_logical_reads,
(qs.total_logical_reads + qs.total_logical_writes) /qs.execution_count AS [Avg IO],
SUBSTRING(qt.[text],qs.statement_start_offset/2, 
    (CASE 
        WHEN qs.statement_end_offset = -1 
     THEN LEN(CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qt.[text])) * 2 
        ELSE qs.statement_end_offset 
     END - qs.statement_start_offset)/2) AS [Query Text],
qs.execution_count,
qs.creation_time
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(qs.sql_handle) AS qt
WHERE qt.[dbid] = DB_ID()
ORDER BY [Avg IO] DESC OPTION (RECOMPILE);

--Get executing requests
SELECT session_id, blocking_session_id, wait_type, last_wait_type, wait_time, total_elapsed_time, cpu_time, logical_reads, reads, writes
FROM sys.dm_exec_requests AS r
ORDER BY wait_time DESC
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Make sure that you DON'T use GUIDs for PKs with clustered index.

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It's optimized a good way past that, but thank you for the comment. GUIDs are a page split nightmare in clustered indexes, so yeah. Agreed. Your answer should contain a tip like that for future readers. –  Pittsburgh DBA May 5 '12 at 22:01
    
Ok, what about the throttling issue, was it resolved? What exactly do you experience when throttled? Are the requests taking longer time to return, or does it return an error? –  Registered User May 5 '12 at 22:34
    
Good question. It will never be resolved; it's part of the design of SQL Azure. We are building for high scaleout on this platform, short of going NoSQL on AZT, so now we want to see how much power can be squeezed out of one each instance. 120 is the current tipping point, but we can get way higher via BCP, so we are profiling all of the little moving parts now. I'll update as we proceed. –  Pittsburgh DBA May 5 '12 at 22:46
    
Do you use The Transient Fault Handling Application Block? With SQL Azure a retry logic is a must. –  Registered User May 5 '12 at 22:56
    
Pretty much, yes. We have the same logic already. That EAB will make it cleaner. –  Pittsburgh DBA May 6 '12 at 1:10
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