Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Would it be a bad idea to use a boolean to determine if child element was clicked or not? Is there any better method?

Note: I don't want to use jquery for this.

See code below:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<title></title>
<style type="text/css">
body{margin:0;}
#container{height:300px;background:red}
#box{width:500px;height:300px;background:blue;margin:auto}
</style>
</head>
<body>
<div id="container">
<div id="box"></div>
</div>
<script>
var hbWindow = window,
    hbDocument = document,
    hbBooleanIfIsOutside = new Boolean(),
    hbIdBox = hbDocument.getElementById('box'),
    hbIdContainer = hbDocument.getElementById('container');

hbWindow.onload = function () {

    hbIdContainer.onclick = function () {
        if(hbBooleanIfIsOutside) {
            alert('you\'re outside!');
        } else {
            alert('you\'re inside!');
        }
        hbBooleanIfIsOutside = true;
    }

    hbIdBox.onclick = function () {
        hbBooleanIfIsOutside = false;
    }

}
</script>
</body>
</html>

Added new version:

In this version I am using addEventListener instead.

var hbWindow = window,
    hbDocument = document,
    hbIdBox = hbDocument.getElementById('box'),
    hbIdContainer = hbDocument.getElementById('container');

hbWindow.onload = function () {

function inOrOut(e){
    if (!e) e = hbWindow.event;
    if((e.target || e.srcElement).id == 'container') {
        alert('you\'re outside!');
    } else {
        alert('you\'re inside!');
    }
}

hbIdContainer.addEventListener('click', inOrOut, false);

}
share|improve this question
    
why are you aliasing window and document? –  Mathletics May 2 '12 at 20:07
    
just a habit... –  user1087110 May 2 '12 at 20:08
    
a habit, sure, but why did you start? –  Mathletics May 2 '12 at 20:34
    
I am caching all variables to speed up things (but I guess it's micro optimization) –  user1087110 May 2 '12 at 20:37
    
you're replacing things that are already global with new global variables with longer names. Seems like you're hurting readability and allocating more variables than you actually need. This is the opposite of optimization. –  Mathletics May 2 '12 at 20:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you wish to know what invoked the click, check event.target. On IE6-8 you would check the window.event.srcElement property.

if ( document.body.addEventListener ) {
  document.body.addEventListener("click", alertMe, false);
} else if ( document.body.attachEvent ) {
  document.body.attachEvent("onclick", alertMe);
}

function alertMe(event) {
  console.log( event.target || window.event.srcElement.nodeName );
}

So while we're attaching the event to the document.body, we can determine by the target (or in some cases the srcElement) which child triggered the click.

Demo: http://jsbin.com/oxuzek/7/edit

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Jonathan! When to use "element.addEventListener("click", alertMe, false)" and when to use "element.onclick"? :S –  user1087110 May 2 '12 at 20:29
    
@user1087110 "onclick" was the old-school method if I'm not mistaken, and should be your last resort after attachEvent. Using addEventListener you can add multiple event handlers. –  Jonathan Sampson May 2 '12 at 20:32
    
Thanks for explaining! –  user1087110 May 2 '12 at 20:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.