Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to save a binary tree to a file upon ending a program and to rebuild it when I again run the program. My save method looks something like this:

public static void save(TreeNode node, BufferedWriter out) {
    if (node == null) return;
    out.write(node.value()); // these nodes hold Strings
    out.newLine();
    save(node.left(), out);
    save(node.right(), out);
}

The part I'm having trouble with is the rebuilding process, so help on that would be much appreciated.

EDIT: It will be known that every node has either 2 or 0 children.

share|improve this question
1  
What do have for so far? What are you having trouble with? –  twain249 May 2 '12 at 20:08
    
How about just serialize it with ObjectOutPutStream, then deserialize it with ObjectInputStream? –  esej May 2 '12 at 20:09
    
@A.R.S. I understand that you're having trouble with the reading but what I wanted to know was what part of the reading, i.e. getting the file set up, reading a line, creating the tree, nodes aren't in the right location etc? –  twain249 May 2 '12 at 20:11
    
@A. R. S From the year 2k java.sun.com/developer/technicalArticles/Programming/… –  esej May 2 '12 at 20:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you want to save the tree in exactly the same branching structure, you'd need to represent null.

private static final String NULL_TREE_NODE = "";

public static void save(TreeNode node, BufferedWriter out) {
    if (node == null) {
        out.write(NULL_TREE_NODE); // null
        out.newLine();
        return;
    }
    assert !node.value().equals(NULL_TREE_NODE); // Reserver for us.
    assert !node.value().matches(".*[\r\n].*"); // Newline not allowed in value.
    out.write(node.value()); // these nodes hold Strings
    out.newLine();
    save(node.left(), out);
    save(node.right(), out);
}

public static TreeNode load(BufferedReader in) throws IOException {
    String value = in.readLine();
    if (value == null)
        throw new EOFException(); // Unexpected end of input.
    if (value.equals(NULL_TREE_NODE)) {
        return null;
    }
    TreeNode node = new TreeNode();
    node.value(value);
    node.left(load(in));
    node.right(load(in));
    return node;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This will just create a left-ish tree. Goes all left until it finishes file. Tree can not be reconstructed –  Cratylus May 2 '12 at 20:25
    
No, follows data structure recursively, k( f(a(null, null), null), p(null, null)) would write k f a NTN NTN NTN p NTN NTN. –  Joop Eggen May 2 '12 at 20:34
    
node.left(load(in)); is being called recursivelly until the file is finished in your example. –  Cratylus May 2 '12 at 20:36
    
Will encounter at the end of recursion NULL_TREE_NODE and stop that branch. And continue with right. Hence one needs a "stop", writing something for null. –  Joop Eggen May 2 '12 at 20:37
    
Seems correct to me. +1 –  Cratylus May 2 '12 at 20:52

What you are doing is wrong.
E.g. if you have a tree:

     A  
   B  C   
  D    F  
 E      

You are saving to the file:

A  
B  
D  
E  
C  
F    

It is impossible to reconstruct the tree this way. E.g. who's child is D? B's or A's?

You must change your algorithm to save e.g. level by level so as to be able to know which node has which node as parent

share|improve this answer

Why not to use serialization ? and ObjectOutputStream ,ObjectInputStream and by single method load whole tree ?

class MyTree implements Serializable {
...

    ObjectOutputStream out = null;
    try {
       out = new ObjectOutputStream(new FileOutputStream("xxx.dat"));
       out.writeObject(tree);
    }

...
share|improve this answer
1  
Serialization has a gigantic overhead in Java. Unless you implemented it yourself of course. But for (larger) collections it's generally a bad idea... –  Jens Egholm May 2 '12 at 20:34
    
but on the other side, node.value() ? what would you do if you want to store larger objects than just some primitives ? Binary trees can hold much more than just integers. And serialization is pretty easy way, how to deal with it. And Stoirng objects like text file isn't much better than serialization –  Kousalik May 2 '12 at 20:42
1  
I agree that it's easy, so if you don't care about performance it's fine. But remember serialization means packing the entire class, it's references and their classes plus all the values into the file. For some data-structures that is a lot of work. I'm not saying it won't work but it provides poor performance.. –  Jens Egholm May 2 '12 at 20:57
    
you are right, i didn't say, you aren't. It depends on priorities. –  Kousalik May 4 '12 at 22:08

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.