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I'm currently working on the database part of a project where I have to merge the contents of two databases and I would like to ask you if there exists a simple API method within the Android API/SDK itself that dumps me a database to a SQL text file.

Actually I found no hint in the API documentation about such an implementation myself. And I really doubt there is a single line method somewhere buried behind the curtain.

However I've already made a workaround using the sqlite3 shell tools of Android Linux by invoking:

String[] cmd = {"/system/bin/sh", "-c", ..., "sqlite3 ..."};
Runtime.getRuntime().exec( cmd );

Where I have two choices, a) pipe it directly to an output file or b) write the file using BufferedOutputStream.

Nevertheless, most likely due to compatibility issues am I asking you of a more convenient way within the API itself, rather than using the critical shell trick within the App.

I am also pretty much interested in any fast & pretty clues about merging two databases using Android's database methods.

Thanks.

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There's nothing built in to the API that will help you. You could query, and write the INSERT statements yourself. There's a blog entry (http://mgmblog.com/2009/02/06/export-an-android-sqlite-db-to-an-xml-file-on-the-sd-card/) , on building an XML file from the results of your query. A few tweaks, and you coule build your own dump file.

You don't say what kind of merge you need to do, but you might be able to use ORMLite, by doing something like override the equals method on your model objects to compare the records and/or combine data from certain fields (assuming the schema is the same), without having to write a lot of SQL.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks nice to know. The merge itself is meant to merge potential user customized data to an updated database in case of an App (and database) update. – tupperworx May 3 '12 at 19:05

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