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Either with PHP or a RegExp (or both), how do I match a range of IP addresses?

Sample Incoming IPs

10.210.12.12
10.253.12.12
10.210.12.254
10.210.12.95
10.210.12.60

Sample Ranges

10.210.12.0/24
10.210.12.0/16
10.210.*.*
10.*.*.*

I know that I can do this:

?:(?:25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\.){3}(?:25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)

...but it doesn't take ranges into account. It merely lets you match an incoming number to see if it's an IP address where each octet is 0-255.

EDIT:

There's also this function that I found in a comment at php.net on the ip2long function.

function ip_in_network($ip, $net_addr, $net_mask){ 
    if($net_mask <= 0){ return false; } 
        $ip_binary_string = sprintf("%032b",ip2long($ip)); 
        $net_binary_string = sprintf("%032b",ip2long($net_addr)); 
        return (substr_compare($ip_binary_string,$net_binary_string,0,$net_mask) === 0); 
} 

ip_in_network("192.168.2.1","192.168.2.0",24); //true 
ip_in_network("192.168.6.93","192.168.0.0",16); //true 
ip_in_network("1.6.6.6","128.168.2.0",1); //false

It's short and sweet, but doesn't match the asterisk situation. I also don't know if it's entirely accurate because it returns a true result on this when I thought it would be a false:

echo ip_in_network("192.168.2.1","192.167.0.0",1);

...but perhaps I misunderstand what the /1 would be. Perhaps I needed to use /24.

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5  
Regex really doesn't sound like the right tool to deal with subnet masks (at least not in decimal). It can be done, but it will be ugly. –  Oli Charlesworth May 2 '12 at 20:59
    
You can use regex to try and achieve this, but you will probably be better served by using your languages string.split / explode function and break apart the elements by "." –  Ben Roux May 2 '12 at 21:00
    
Parse both. Apply some math. Regular expressions will entirely fail on any /x not evenly into an octet. So, with that in mind, "what have you tried?" ;-) –  user166390 May 2 '12 at 21:01
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6 Answers 6

I've improved on the above example (I have a netmask with /29 so it doesn't work).

function check_netmask($mask, $ip) {
    @list($net, $bits) = explode('/', $mask);
    $bits = isset($bits) ? $bits : 32;
    $bitmask = -pow(2, 32-$bits) & 0x00000000FFFFFFFF;
    $netmask = ip2long($net) & $bitmask;
    $ip_bits = ip2long($ip)  & $bitmask;
    return (($netmask ^ $ip_bits) == 0);
}

If you want to see it in action, add this:

print("IP Bits: " . str_pad(decbin(ip2long($ip)), 32, '0', STR_PAD_LEFT));
print "\n";
print("Bitmask: " . str_pad(decbin($bitmask), 32, '0', STR_PAD_LEFT));
print "\n";
print("Netmask: " . str_pad(decbin($netmask), 32, '0', STR_PAD_LEFT));
print "\n";
print("Match:   " . str_pad(decbin($netmask ^ $ip_bits), 32, '0', STR_PAD_LEFT));
print "\n";

Run it with something like this:

print var_dump(check_netmask($argv[1], $argv[2]));
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting. Wasn't aware of the /29 problem. I'm tight on time, but can you tell me if you ran the tests that I gave as an example, and what result you found on those tests? It's also fascinating how you pulled this off in fewer lines of code, so I'm wanting to see if it does what my function does, and, if it does, I can switch the answer to this. –  Volomike Dec 4 '12 at 18:44
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Convert to 32 bit unsigned and use boolean/bitwise operations.

For example, convert 192.168.25.1 to 0xC0A81901.

Then, you can see if it matches the mask 192.168.25/24 by converting the dotted-decimal portion of the mask, i.e., 0xC0A81900, and creating a 24 bit mask, i.e., 0xFFFFFF00.

Perform a bitwise AND between the address in question and the mask and compare to the dotted decimal portion of the mask specification. For example,

0xC0A81901 AND 0xFFFFFF00 ==> 0xC0A81900 (result)

compare 0xC0A81900 (result) to 0xC0A81900.

I don't know PHP, but google tells me that PHP has inet_pton(), which is what I would use in C to perform the conversion from dotted-decimal to n-bit unsigned. See http://php.net/manual/en/function.inet-pton.php

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1  
Of note, there's also ip2long –  Volomike May 2 '12 at 21:21
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up vote 3 down vote accepted

I adapted an answer from php.net and made it better.

function netMatch($network, $ip) {
    $network=trim($network);
    $orig_network = $network;
    $ip = trim($ip);
    if ($ip == $network) {
        echo "used network ($network) for ($ip)\n";
        return TRUE;
    }
    $network = str_replace(' ', '', $network);
    if (strpos($network, '*') !== FALSE) {
        if (strpos($network, '/') !== FALSE) {
            $asParts = explode('/', $network);
            $network = @ $asParts[0];
        }
        $nCount = substr_count($network, '*');
        $network = str_replace('*', '0', $network);
        if ($nCount == 1) {
            $network .= '/24';
        } else if ($nCount == 2) {
            $network .= '/16';
        } else if ($nCount == 3) {
            $network .= '/8';
        } else if ($nCount > 3) {
            return TRUE; // if *.*.*.*, then all, so matched
        }
    }

    echo "from original network($orig_network), used network ($network) for ($ip)\n";

    $d = strpos($network, '-');
    if ($d === FALSE) {
        $ip_arr = explode('/', $network);
        if (!preg_match("@\d*\.\d*\.\d*\.\d*@", $ip_arr[0], $matches)){
            $ip_arr[0].=".0";    // Alternate form 194.1.4/24
        }
        $network_long = ip2long($ip_arr[0]);
        $x = ip2long($ip_arr[1]);
        $mask = long2ip($x) == $ip_arr[1] ? $x : (0xffffffff << (32 - $ip_arr[1]));
        $ip_long = ip2long($ip);
        return ($ip_long & $mask) == ($network_long & $mask);
    } else {
        $from = trim(ip2long(substr($network, 0, $d)));
        $to = trim(ip2long(substr($network, $d+1)));
        $ip = ip2long($ip);
        return ($ip>=$from and $ip<=$to);
    }
}

function ech($b) {
    if ($b) {
        echo "MATCHED\n";
    } else {
        echo "DID NOT MATCH\n";
    }
}

echo "CLASS A TESTS\n";
ech(netMatch('10.168.1.0-10.168.1.100', '10.168.1.90'));
ech(netMatch('10.168.*.*', '10.168.1.90'));
ech(netMatch('10.168.0.0/16', '10.168.1.90'));
ech(netMatch('10.169.1.0/24', '10.168.1.90'));
ech(netMatch('10.168.1.90', '10.168.1.90'));
echo "\nCLASS B TESTS\n";
ech(netMatch('130.168.1.0-130.168.1.100', '130.168.1.90'));
ech(netMatch('130.168.*.*', '130.168.1.90'));
ech(netMatch('130.168.0.0/16', '130.168.1.90'));
ech(netMatch('130.169.1.0/24', '130.168.1.90'));
ech(netMatch('130.168.1.90', '130.168.1.90'));
echo "\nCLASS C TESTS\n";
ech(netMatch('192.168.1.0-192.168.1.100', '192.168.1.90'));
ech(netMatch('192.168.*.*', '192.168.1.90'));
ech(netMatch('192.168.0.0/16', '192.168.1.90'));
ech(netMatch('192.169.1.0/24', '192.168.1.90'));
ech(netMatch('192.168.1.90', '192.168.1.90'));
echo "\nCLASS D TESTS\n";
ech(netMatch('230.168.1.0-230.168.1.100', '230.168.1.90'));
ech(netMatch('230.168.*.*', '230.168.1.90'));
ech(netMatch('230.168.0.0/16', '230.168.1.90'));
ech(netMatch('230.169.1.0/24', '230.168.1.90'));
ech(netMatch('230.168.1.90', '230.168.1.90'));
echo "\nCLASS E TESTS\n";
ech(netMatch('250.168.1.0-250.168.1.100', '250.168.1.90'));
ech(netMatch('250.168.*.*', '250.168.1.90'));
ech(netMatch('250.168.0.0/16', '250.168.1.90'));
ech(netMatch('250.169.1.0/24', '250.168.1.90'));
ech(netMatch('250.168.1.90', '250.168.1.90'));

This results with:

CLASS A TESTS
from orig network (10.168.1.0-10.168.1.100) used network (10.168.1.0-10.168.1.100) for (10.168.1.90)
MATCHED
from orig network (10.168.*.*) used network (10.168.0.0/16) for (10.168.1.90)
MATCHED
from orig network (10.168.0.0/16) used network (10.168.0.0/16) for (10.168.1.90)
MATCHED
from orig network (10.169.1.0/24) used network (10.169.1.0/24) for (10.168.1.90)
DID NOT MATCH
used network (10.168.1.90) for (10.168.1.90)
MATCHED

CLASS B TESTS
from orig network (130.168.1.0-130.168.1.100) used network (130.168.1.0-130.168.1.100) for (130.168.1.90)
MATCHED
from orig network (130.168.*.*) used network (130.168.0.0/16) for (130.168.1.90)
MATCHED
from orig network (130.168.0.0/16) used network (130.168.0.0/16) for (130.168.1.90)
MATCHED
from orig network (130.169.1.0/24) used network (130.169.1.0/24) for (130.168.1.90)
DID NOT MATCH
used network (130.168.1.90) for (130.168.1.90)
MATCHED

CLASS C TESTS
from orig network (192.168.1.0-192.168.1.100) used network (192.168.1.0-192.168.1.100) for (192.168.1.90)
MATCHED
from orig network (192.168.*.*) used network (192.168.0.0/16) for (192.168.1.90)
MATCHED
from orig network (192.168.0.0/16) used network (192.168.0.0/16) for (192.168.1.90)
MATCHED
from orig network (192.169.1.0/24) used network (192.169.1.0/24) for (192.168.1.90)
DID NOT MATCH
used network (192.168.1.90) for (192.168.1.90)
MATCHED

CLASS D TESTS
from orig network (230.168.1.0-230.168.1.100) used network (230.168.1.0-230.168.1.100) for (230.168.1.90)
MATCHED
from orig network (230.168.*.*) used network (230.168.0.0/16) for (230.168.1.90)
MATCHED
from orig network (230.168.0.0/16) used network (230.168.0.0/16) for (230.168.1.90)
MATCHED
from orig network (230.169.1.0/24) used network (230.169.1.0/24) for (230.168.1.90)
DID NOT MATCH
used network (230.168.1.90) for (230.168.1.90)
MATCHED

CLASS E TESTS
from orig network (250.168.1.0-250.168.1.100) used network (250.168.1.0-250.168.1.100) for (250.168.1.90)
MATCHED
from orig network (250.168.*.*) used network (250.168.0.0/16) for (250.168.1.90)
MATCHED
from orig network (250.168.0.0/16) used network (250.168.0.0/16) for (250.168.1.90)
MATCHED
from orig network (250.169.1.0/24) used network (250.169.1.0/24) for (250.168.1.90)
DID NOT MATCH
used network (250.168.1.90) for (250.168.1.90)
MATCHED
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Regex really doesn't sound like the right tool to deal with subnet masks (at least not in decimal). It can be done, but it will be ugly.

I strongly suggest parsing the string into 4 integers, combining to a 32-bit int, and then using standard bitwise operations (basically a bitwise-AND, and then a comparison).

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same answer as me, faster, and with more useful information. –  Chris Cleeland May 2 '12 at 21:01
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I find an issue with this code. Might this help others who use code from this thread.

On localhost following code gives -1 and on live hosting it gives -4294967296

(0xffffffff << (32 - $ip_arr[1]))

Thats amazing. would you put some light on this

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Use strpos to match them as strings.

<?php
$ips = array();
$ips[0] = "10.210.12.12";
$ips[1] = "10.253.12.12";
$ips[2] = "10.210.12.254";
$ips[3] = "10.210.12.95";
$ips[4] = "10.210.12.60";

$matches = array();

foreach($ips as $ip){
    if(strpos($ip, "10.253.") === 0){
        $matches[] = $ip;
    }
}

print_r($matches);
?>
share|improve this answer
2  
This won't for e.g. /23. –  Oli Charlesworth May 2 '12 at 21:05
1  
@IsisCode - heard of CIDR? –  ghoti May 2 '12 at 22:41
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