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I have data looking like this:

    SNP Geno Allele
marker1   G1    AA
marker2   G1    TT
marker3   G1    TT
marker1   G2    CC
marker2   G2    AA
marker3   G2    TT
marker1   G3    GG
marker2   G3    AA
marker3   G3    TT

And I want it to look like this:

    SNP Geno Allele1 Allele2
marker1   G1       A       A
marker2   G1       T       T
marker3   G1       T       T
marker1   G2       C       C
marker2   G2       A       A
marker3   G2       T       T
marker1   G3       G       G
marker2   G3       A       A
marker3   G3       T       T

I am using this:

strsplit(Allele, split extended = TRUE)

But this is not working. Do I need additional commands?

share|improve this question
    
@Chase - removing or updating dead link would be nice. especially when downvoting. –  topchef Aug 26 at 4:18
    
Updating a two+ year old link...see here for references on the colsplit function from package reshape2. –  Chase Aug 26 at 15:53
    
@topchef - updated the two year old link...internet has a funny history sometimes...thanks for the heads up. –  Chase Aug 26 at 15:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Another approach, from start to finish:

Make reproducible data:

dat <- read.table(header = TRUE,  text = "SNP Geno    Allele
marker1 G1  AA
marker2 G1  TT
marker3 G1  TT
marker1 G2  CC
marker2 G2  AA
marker3 G2  TT
marker1 G3  GG
marker2 G3  AA
marker3 G3  TT")

UPDATED Extract the Allele column, split it into individual characters, then make those characters into two columns of a data frame:

EITHER

dat1 <- data.frame(t(matrix(
                     unlist(strsplit(as.vector(dat$Allele), split = "")), 
                     ncol = length(dat$Allele), nrow = 2)))

OR following @joran's suggestion

dat1 <- data.frame(do.call(rbind, strsplit(as.vector(dat$Allele), split = "")))

THEN

Add column names to the new columns:

names(dat1) <- c("Allele1", "Allele2")

Attach the two new columns to columns from the original data table, as @user1317221 suggests:

dat3 <- cbind(dat$SNP, dat$Geno, dat1)
        dat$SNP dat$Geno Allele1 Allele2
1 marker1       G1       A       A
2 marker2       G1       T       T
3 marker3       G1       T       T
4 marker1       G2       C       C
5 marker2       G2       A       A
6 marker3       G2       T       T
7 marker1       G3       G       G
8 marker2       G3       A       A
9 marker3       G3       T       T
share|improve this answer
    
I tried your code, the shape of the data is how I wanted it, but the letters for allele 1 and allele 2 are not right. Somehow R is not splitting the column correctly. For the 2nd row it should be an A for allele 1 and allele 2, instead it is a A and T and that is wrong. –  marie May 2 '12 at 22:57
    
I think you probably wanted to do something like do.call(rbind,...) on the results of the strsplit call. –  joran May 2 '12 at 23:41
    
@marie, sorry about that, my mistake. I've updated the answer now, the output now matches what the you want exactly. –  Ben May 3 '12 at 2:01
    
@joran thanks for that, I'm not very familiar with do.call, but it works as you say and saves quite a bit of typing! –  Ben May 3 '12 at 2:05
    
@Ben. Thank you very much! Perfect, exactly what I needed!!! –  marie May 3 '12 at 12:47

Try:

Allele<-dat$Allele    
Allele1<-substr(Allele, start = 1, stop = 1)
Allele2<-substr(Allele, start = 2, stop = 2)

you can then cbind them together or however you want to put them in the data frame

EDIT:

@Ben is correct I have corrected my code for you above or use Ben's suggestion

Allele1 <- with(dat, substr(Allele, start = 1, stop = 1))

share|improve this answer
    
The column reference is incomplete in your answer, you should have something like Allele1 <- with(dat, substr(Allele, start = 1, stop = 1)) or Allele1 <- substr(dat$Allele, start = 1, stop = 1) –  Ben May 2 '12 at 21:48
    
I tried your code but the "allele" column is still not separated. –  marie May 2 '12 at 23:21
    
what errors or results do you get then? do you realise this code makes two new vectors of the format you want, it does not change the actual allele column? –  user1317221_G May 2 '12 at 23:50
    
@marie, obviously you'll need to combine the new vectors that have been created. Combining everything is easy too: data.frame(dat[-3], Allele1 = substr(dat$Allele, 1, 1), Allele2 = substr(dat$Allele, 2, 2)) –  Ananda Mahto May 3 '12 at 10:51

Another trick for this is to use read.fwf. Unlike read.table and co., read.fwf doesn't have a text argument, so you need to use textConnection:

# dat$Allele <- as.character(dat$Allele) # Necessary if it's a factor
cbind(dat[-3], 
      read.fwf(textConnection(dat$Allele), 
               widths = c(1, 1), col.names=c("Allele1", "Allele2")))
#       SNP Geno Allele1 Allele2
# 1 marker1   G1       A       A
# 2 marker2   G1       T       T
# 3 marker3   G1       T       T
# 4 marker1   G2       C       C
# 5 marker2   G2       A       A
# 6 marker3   G2       T       T
# 7 marker1   G3       G       G
# 8 marker2   G3       A       A
# 9 marker3   G3       T       T

Old answer

Building on both alternatives already presented, here's a one-line version (assuming your data frame is named dat.

transform(dat, Allele1 = substr(Allele, 1, 1), 
          Allele2 = substr(Allele, 2, 2))[-3]

Which gives us:

      SNP Geno Allele1 Allele2
1 marker1   G1       A       A
2 marker2   G1       T       T
3 marker3   G1       T       T
4 marker1   G2       C       C
5 marker2   G2       A       A
6 marker3   G2       T       T
7 marker1   G3       G       G
8 marker2   G3       A       A
9 marker3   G3       T       T

It's exactly the same concept as this response but using transform.


Update (a long time later)

You can also use cSplit from my "splitstackshape" package with the argument stripWhite = FALSE.

For example, to split the "Allele" column, try:

library(splitstackshape)
cSplit(dat, "Allele", "", stripWhite = FALSE)
#        SNP Geno Allele_1 Allele_2
# 1: marker1   G1        A        A
# 2: marker2   G1        T        T
# 3: marker3   G1        T        T
# 4: marker1   G2        C        C
# 5: marker2   G2        A        A
# 6: marker3   G2        T        T
# 7: marker1   G3        G        G
# 8: marker2   G3        A        A
# 9: marker3   G3        T        T

See also: Split one column to two columns in R with looping

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot. This approach works perfect, too!!! –  marie May 3 '12 at 12:49

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