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I have a table with a nested table...

<table id="Table1">
    <tr>
        <td>
            Row 1 
        </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>
            Row 2
            <table id="Table2">
                <tr>
                    <td>
                      Row 1 
                    </td>
                </tr>
            </table>
        </td>
    </tr>
</table>

I use jQuery to find the tr row count...

var RowCount = $("#Table1 tr").length;

How do I write jquery to find ONLY the row count of the parent table Table1 and not the combined nested Table2 ? For example: the result I would be looking for would be RowCount = 2 and not RowCount = 3.

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted
// Using the DOM property:
var rowCount = $("#Table1")[0].rows.length;
// Or:
var rowCount = $("#Table1 > tbody > tr").length;
// Using the child selector, "parent > child"

I've renamed RowCount to rowCount, because only consstructor names start with a capital, by convention.

share|improve this answer
    
It actually is a duplicate. I wonder how that answer worked though... – Felix Kling May 2 '12 at 21:33
    
@Rob Both work awesome! Thanks man. – Joe May 2 '12 at 21:38

the line below uses jQuery's .children to get immediate descendants of the selected objects, and optionally filter results with a selector argument.. In your case, table1 and "tr" respectively.

var rowCount = $("#Table1").children("tr").length;

share|improve this answer
    
trs are never the children of a table element. Browsers always insert a tbody element automatically. – Felix Kling May 2 '12 at 21:34
    
@Felix figures, i'm busy typing up a comment, edit a typo in my answer, and my comment becomes irrelevant. sigh anyway. "Always try to build a <table><thead/><tfoot/><tbody/></table> with all those elements in that order. i've been told it helps most browsers render the table faster. – DefyGravity May 2 '12 at 21:38

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