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This is my code:

  void get_pass(char *p);

int main(){

    char *host, *user, *pass;

    host = malloc(64); /* spazio per max 64 caratteri */
    if(!host) abort(); /* se malloc ritorna NULL allora termino l'esecuzione */
    host[63] = '\0';   /* evitare un tipo di buffer overflow impostando l'ultimo byte come NUL byte */

    user = malloc(64);
    if(!user) abort();
    user[63] = '\0';

    pass = malloc(64);
    if(!pass) abort();
    pass[63] = '\0';

    /* Immissione di hostname, username e password; controllo inoltre i 'return code' dei vari fscanf e, se non sono 0, esco */
    fprintf(stdout,"--> Inserisci <hostname>: ");
    if(fscanf(stdin, "%63s", host) == EOF){
        fprintf(stdout, "\nErrore, impossibile leggere i dati\n");
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }
    fprintf(stdout,"\n--> Inserisci <username>: ");
    if(fscanf(stdin, "%63s", user) == EOF){
        fprintf(stdout, "\nErrore, impossibile leggere i dati\n");
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    };
    fprintf(stdout, "\n--> Inserisci <password>: ");
    get_pass(pass);

    /* Stampo a video le informazioni immesse */
    fprintf(stdout, "\n\nHost: %s\nUser: %s\nPass: %s\n\n", host,user,pass);

    /* Azzero il buffer della password e libero la memoria occupata */
    memset(pass,0,(strlen(pass)+1));
    free(host);
    free(user);
    free(pass);

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

void get_pass(char *p){
    /* Grazie a termios.h posso disabilitare l'echoing del terminale (password nascosta) */
    struct termios term, term_orig;
    tcgetattr(STDIN_FILENO, &term);
        term_orig = term;
        term.c_lflag &= ~ECHO;
        tcsetattr(STDIN_FILENO, TCSANOW, &term);
        /* Leggo la password e controllo il 'return code' di fscanf */
        if(fscanf(stdin, "%63s", p) == EOF){
        fprintf(stdout, "\nErrore, impossibile leggere i dati\n");
        tcsetattr(STDIN_FILENO, TCSANOW, &term_orig);
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    };
        /* Reimposto il terminale allo stato originale */
        tcsetattr(STDIN_FILENO, TCSANOW, &term_orig);
}

I would like to know if it is correct that the function get_pass haven't a return code?

In this function I read the password with fscanf and then I think that I have to return it to the main program...but:

  1. I don't know how (with return p; I got a warning)
  2. It works also without return p; so I think that it is all ok...but I'm not so sure...

I don't understand how return work with functions.

share|improve this question
    
Note that you have prevented your users from using spaces in passwords. This doesn't matter as long as they know they can't use a space in their password. –  Jonathan Leffler May 2 '12 at 21:47
    
This code has a critical buffer overflow vulnerability... –  R.. May 2 '12 at 21:49
    
So does the POSIX getpass() function :) –  Jonathan Leffler May 2 '12 at 21:50
    
why it has buffer overflow?? PS i have done a function that check the stirngs input! –  polslinux May 2 '12 at 21:50
1  
@polslinux - at this point (as seem from your code) it might be too late. –  MByD May 2 '12 at 21:55

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted
int main() 
{
   char * password = NULL;

   get_pass(&password); //that is how you want to pass pointer to pointer

}

void get_pass(char **password) 
{

//1. get password using scanf from stdin or whatever way you want. 
//2. assign it to *password 
//3. no need to return anything

}

Remember, you need to handle memory allocation for password string. Let's say you want to fix the password size to MAX_PASS_SIZE, then allocate that much memory either in main() or in get_pass so that you don't corrupt your stack memory. The above snippet I wrote just shows how to populate value into password, which probably is your main question, i.e. pass a pointer to pointer.

share|improve this answer
    
I've posted the full code...i've handled memory allocation with malloc :) thanks in advance for your help but i don't understand the difference between my and your code :( i'm a newbie in C. Which is better and how? –  polslinux May 2 '12 at 22:10
    
no worries, I looked at the code and it looks good to me. Your original code was different I guess :). The return p statement raises warning because you cannot return string pointer when your function is declared to return void. –  Gaurav Sinha May 2 '12 at 22:17
    
Yes it was a little bit different :) in my code i have cleared the pass buffer with memset, if i use *p into the function i haven't to clear anything right? –  polslinux May 2 '12 at 22:21
    
your use of memset is not right or not needed. If you memset before calling get_pass, it makes sense, because it sets the buffer to all zeros and even if your password is smaller than 64 chars, it is always NULL terminated (has 0). Now, in your new code, you are doing memset with zero just before freeing it. This is not doing any good to you, right? –  Gaurav Sinha May 2 '12 at 22:34
    
Ah ok...i thought that for "security reason" it was necessary to delete the pwd's buffer :) –  polslinux May 2 '12 at 22:37
  1. A function with void return type should not return anything.
  2. You can use the return; statement to return from the function to the caller at any point.
  3. If no return; statement has been reached, and the function reaches its end, the control is returned to its caller.
share|improve this answer
    
so it is not good to use void...have i to use char? And how can i return p? –  polslinux May 2 '12 at 21:52
    
It's fine to use void, you fill the buffer referenced by p (I hope there's such a buffer :) ), you don't need to return p, as you already know it (it's an address) in the caller. –  MByD May 2 '12 at 21:53
    
ok thanks a lot! PS: i've updated the question with full code :) –  polslinux May 2 '12 at 22:00

get_pass is defined to return void, which is nothing. In this case the return value is passed through the parameter p.

share|improve this answer

If you want to be able to allow spaces in the password you could use something like the following. Turn off line buffering and handle the password one character at a time instead of using fscanf.

    #include <stdio.h>
    #include <errno.h>
    #include <termios.h>
    #include <unistd.h>
    #include <stdlib.h>
    #include <string.h>

    void get_pass(char *p);
    void flushStdin( void );

    int main(){
        // what you have now in your code.
    }



    void flushStdin( void )
    {
        int c;

        while ((c = getchar()) != '\n' && c != EOF);

        return;
    }


    void get_pass(char *p){

    int i = 0;
    int c;
    /* Grazie a termios.h posso disabilitare l'echoing del terminale (password nascosta) */
    struct termios term, term_orig;

    tcgetattr(STDIN_FILENO, &term);

    term_orig = term;
    term.c_lflag &= ~ECHO;
    term.c_lflag &= ~ICANON;
    tcsetattr(STDIN_FILENO, TCSANOW, &term);
    /* Leggo la password e controllo il 'return code' di fscanf */

    flushStdin();
    while( (( c = getchar() ) != '\n') && (i < 63) )
    {
        if( c != 127 )  // did user hit the backspace key?
        {
            p[i++] = (char)c;
        }
        else
        {
            // null last character in password and backup to one space in string
            // should make sure i doesn't go negative... oops.
            if( i > 0 )
            {
                p[--i] = 0x00;
            }
        }
    }

    tcsetattr(STDIN_FILENO, TCSANOW, &term_orig);

    return;
}
share|improve this answer
    
i don't understand why you start from i++ (or i--). With this code i don't use all the array but only 1 space yes and 1 no O.o –  polslinux May 3 '12 at 6:56
    
and also i don't understand the "flushStdin"...why i have to do this?? Thanks :) –  polslinux May 3 '12 at 7:01
    
or i can use fscanf(stdin, %s %63[^\n]", p) ...right? –  polslinux May 3 '12 at 7:06
    
The i++ and --i are to handle when a character is going into the string and when a character is being "removed" if the user hits the backspace key. flushStdin() is used because the \n still remains in the stdin buffer on entry to the function. And one space is left for the NULL character at the end so it remains a valid "string". –  Chimera May 3 '12 at 14:21
    
ok...but with i++ if a press A as first chars it won't go into pass[0] but into pass[1] because i++ is used... –  polslinux May 3 '12 at 15:10

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