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'm trying to retrieve the shortest path between first and last node. The problem is my code always returns 0. I have a feeling this is because it's computing the distance between first node and first node, which is going to zero, but i'm not 100%. Why is my code always returning 0?

The adj matrix is [10][10] and all nodes are connected, and g.network[][] is the matrix.

private static int dijkstras(Graph g) {
    // Dijkstra's Algorithm
    int[] best = new int[g.network.length];
    boolean[] visited = new boolean[g.network.length];
    int max = 10000; // Infinity equivalent.
    for (int i = 0; i < g.network.length; i++)
    {
        best[i] = max;
        visited[i] = false;
    }

    best[0] = 0;

    for(int i = 0; i < g.network.length; i++)
    {
        int min = max;
        int currentNode = 0;
        for (int j = 0; j < g.network.length; j++)
        {
            if (!visited[j] && best[j] < min)
            {
                currentNode = j;
                min = best[j];
            }
        }
        visited[currentNode] = true;
        for (int j = 0; j < g.network.length; j++)
        {
            if (g.network[currentNode][j] < max && best[currentNode] + g.network[currentNode][j] < best[j])
            {
                best[j] = best[currentNode] + g.network[currentNode][j];
            }
        }
    }
            return best[g.network.length - 2];
}
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closed as not a real question by casperOne May 4 '12 at 19:22

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
It seems like you're missing some code. Perhaps the return 0; that ends the method? I'm only kidding of course, but I don't see a return statement anywhere :-/ –  Jeremy Heiler May 3 '12 at 1:12
2  
Besides missing the return statement so that it actually doesn't compile, your code has no usage of the start parameter, so it can't possibly distinguish the start from any other node. That means you are at some point comparing start to start and if you returned anything it would probably be that minimum distance of 0. –  Don Roby May 3 '12 at 1:16
    
Appologies, when I copied and pasted my code I missed off the return statement. I used start when I called the method in a previous attempt but have not removed it yet. I shall do that now as it's redundant. FYI, start was set to 0 in previous attempts. –  JasonMortonNZ May 3 '12 at 1:21
    
Dijkstra's algorithm doesn't work without a start vertex. –  Louis Wasserman May 3 '12 at 1:47
    
Yeah I know, but rather than passing the start node index into the method, it's just starts at zero in my code. –  JasonMortonNZ May 3 '12 at 2:10

2 Answers 2

I read your code and I'm almost sure it's correct dijkstra algorithm so I think maybe you have a zero path between your first node and last node.

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1  
I can't answer my own question because of a to low rep, but I have pasted my fix here. You were right, because I set best[0] = 0 it was always returning zero as it was a zero path between nodes. pastebin.com/nmp8P1zW –  JasonMortonNZ May 3 '12 at 3:26
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think I may have solved the issue, by modifying the code as follows (I'm now passing in a start point instead of the hard-coded in "0"):

    private static int dijkstras(Graph g, int start) // Added a start point.
    {
    // Dijkstra's Algorithm
    int[] best = new int[g.network.length];
    boolean[] visited = new boolean[g.network.length];
    int max = 10000; // Infinity equivalent.
    for (int i = 0; i < g.network.length; i++)
    {
        best[i] = max;
        visited[i] = false;
    }

    best[start] = start; // Changed the 0 to variable start.

    for(int i = 0; i < g.network.length; i++)
    {
        int min = max;
        int currentNode = 0;
        for (int j = 0; j < g.network.length; j++)
        {
            if (!visited[j] && best[j] < min)
            {
                currentNode = j;
                min = best[j];
            }
        }
        visited[currentNode] = true;
        for (int j = 0; j < g.network.length; j++)
        {
            if (g.network[currentNode][j] < max && best[currentNode] +   g.network[currentNode][j] < best[j])
            {
                best[j] = best[currentNode] + g.network[currentNode][j];
            }
        }
    }
            return best[g.network.length - 2];
}

I ran this code through a for loop and voila....not just zero's being returned now.

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