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A class can act as a string through its __str__ method, or as a function via its __call__ method. Can it act as, say, a list, or a tuple?

class A (object):
    def __???__ (self):
        return (1, 2, 3)

>>> a = A()
>>> a * 3
(1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3)

EDIT...

Here's a better example to help clarify the above.

class Vector (object):
    def __init__ (self):
        self.vec = (1,2,3)
    def __???__ (self):
        # something like __repr__; non-string
        return self.vec

class Widget (object):
    def __init__ (self):
        self.vector = Vector()

>>> w = Widget()
>>> w.vector
(1, 2, 3) # not a string representation (at least, before being repr'd here)

Basically, I want something like __repr__ that doesn't return a string, but returns a tuple (or list) when I simply invoke the name pointing to the Vector instance, but I don't want to lose the rest of the abilities in the instance, like access to other properties and methods. I also don't want to have to use w.vector.vec to get to the data. I want vector to act like a tuple attribute of w, while still being able to do something like w.vector.whatever(), or overriding __mul__ so I can scale the vector via w.vector * 5. Possible?

share|improve this question
1  
The class doesn't act as a string when you call __str__ it creates and returns a NEW string object. I don't really see what your getting at... –  Joel Cornett May 3 '12 at 1:29
2  
Subclass tuple. –  Russell Borogove May 3 '12 at 2:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Depending on what your goal is, you can create a class that inherits from built-in classes like list or tuple:

>>> class A(tuple):
...     def speak(self):
...         print "Bark!"
... 
>>> a = A((1,2,3)) # extra parens needed to distinguish single tuple arg from 3 scalar args
>>> a * 3
(1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3)
>>> a.speak()
Bark!

Given your Vector use case, subclassing tuple might well do the trick.

import math

class Vector(tuple):
    def magnitude(self):
        return math.sqrt( self[0]*self[0]+self[1]*self[1]+self[2]*self[2] )
share|improve this answer
    
I'm going to have a test a bit, but I think this is the answer. I basically want a tuple that I can do other things with/to, like add properties and methods, and access them, but if I just use it anywhere, I want it to "be" a tuple. –  Gary Fixler May 3 '12 at 2:10
    
What's your larger goal? You might want Panda3D or something. –  Russell Borogove May 3 '12 at 2:11
    
That's funny. We actually use Panda at my company. My goal is to be able to have something like vectors as constant-like properties of certain class instances, which can be accessed very easily as instance properties (i.e. w.vector), scaled simply (e.g. w.vector*3 scales each component), and manipulated in many other ways with custom methods (e.g. w.vector.inWorld()). I also want these properties to be able to serve up further information about themselves(e.g. w.vector.property). –  Gary Fixler May 3 '12 at 2:18
    
@GaryFixler: Are you sure you don't want to subclass something like numpy.array() instead of a plain Python tuple or list? –  Li-aung Yip May 3 '12 at 2:20
    
I'm not sure about that, as I have not looked into numpy. However, if I go with numpy, it means further R&D time, and the need to deploy it as part of a toolchain, which lessens the ROI a bit. My needs are quite simple here. –  Gary Fixler May 3 '12 at 2:21

For the specific behaviour in your example (A*3 gives three concatenated copies of the data in A) you want to implement the __mul__() operator.

For example, these are equivalent:

>>> a = [1,2,3]
>>> a*3
[1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3]
>>> a.__mul__(3)
[1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3]
>>> 

More generally, if you want to implement a sequence type you have to implement all of the operations defined for sequence types. You have to define -

  • what A[3] means (__getitem__(), __setitem__())
  • what A[1:10] means (__getslice__())
  • what for item in A: means (__iter__())

and so on.

Here's the full list of methods defined on lists:

>>> pprint.pprint(dict(list.__dict__))
{'__add__': <slot wrapper '__add__' of 'list' objects>,
 '__contains__': <slot wrapper '__contains__' of 'list' objects>,
 '__delitem__': <slot wrapper '__delitem__' of 'list' objects>,
 '__delslice__': <slot wrapper '__delslice__' of 'list' objects>,
 '__doc__': "list() -> new empty list\nlist(iterable) -> new list initialized from iterable's items",
 '__eq__': <slot wrapper '__eq__' of 'list' objects>,
 '__ge__': <slot wrapper '__ge__' of 'list' objects>,
 '__getattribute__': <slot wrapper '__getattribute__' of 'list' objects>,
 '__getitem__': <method '__getitem__' of 'list' objects>,
 '__getslice__': <slot wrapper '__getslice__' of 'list' objects>,
 '__gt__': <slot wrapper '__gt__' of 'list' objects>,
 '__hash__': None,
 '__iadd__': <slot wrapper '__iadd__' of 'list' objects>,
 '__imul__': <slot wrapper '__imul__' of 'list' objects>,
 '__init__': <slot wrapper '__init__' of 'list' objects>,
 '__iter__': <slot wrapper '__iter__' of 'list' objects>,
 '__le__': <slot wrapper '__le__' of 'list' objects>,
 '__len__': <slot wrapper '__len__' of 'list' objects>,
 '__lt__': <slot wrapper '__lt__' of 'list' objects>,
 '__mul__': <slot wrapper '__mul__' of 'list' objects>,
 '__ne__': <slot wrapper '__ne__' of 'list' objects>,
 '__new__': <built-in method __new__ of type object at 0x1E1DACA8>,
 '__repr__': <slot wrapper '__repr__' of 'list' objects>,
 '__reversed__': <method '__reversed__' of 'list' objects>,
 '__rmul__': <slot wrapper '__rmul__' of 'list' objects>,
 '__setitem__': <slot wrapper '__setitem__' of 'list' objects>,
 '__setslice__': <slot wrapper '__setslice__' of 'list' objects>,
 '__sizeof__': <method '__sizeof__' of 'list' objects>,
 'append': <method 'append' of 'list' objects>,
 'count': <method 'count' of 'list' objects>,
 'extend': <method 'extend' of 'list' objects>,
 'index': <method 'index' of 'list' objects>,
 'insert': <method 'insert' of 'list' objects>,
 'pop': <method 'pop' of 'list' objects>,
 'remove': <method 'remove' of 'list' objects>,
 'reverse': <method 'reverse' of 'list' objects>,
 'sort': <method 'sort' of 'list' objects>}
share|improve this answer
    
I know about the __mul__ operator, and will be implementing it for this need. However, in my example I was just trying to show that it was indeed returning a tuple, and not a string representation of a tuple. It's getting a simple usage of a class to act like a type, while still retaining other abilities, like calling methods that I'm interested in. Maybe I can subclass tuple somehow? –  Gary Fixler May 3 '12 at 1:47
1  
@GaryFixler: If you want to be able to cast the object to a tuple, you need to make the object "iterable". (remember the TypeError: 'A' object is not iterable error? That's what it's talking about.) Implementing __iter__() should be sufficient to do that. Then tuple(A), which expands to tuple(A.__iter__()), should do what you want. Likewise, loops over A will work, list comprehensions will work, and so on. –  Li-aung Yip May 3 '12 at 1:53
1  
@Li-aungYip note that you don't need to implement __setitem__ as part of the sequence protocol (unless you explicitly want it to be mutable, in which case you want to implement __delitem__, insert and others as well), and __{get,set,del}slice__ has been deprecated for a while in favour of passing a slice object to __{get,set,del}item__. The best and easiest way for a class to implement the full sequence protocol is to inherit from collections.Sequence (or, collections.abc.Sequence from 3.3). (unless it makes sense to inherit from an existing sequence type, of course). –  lvc May 3 '12 at 2:03
    
@lvc: Thanks for that. I forgot to mention that a sequence type really only needs to be iterable. get* and set* are only needed to random access to elements. Good information about collections.Sequence as well, thanks for that. –  Li-aung Yip May 3 '12 at 2:23

The class doesn't act as a string when you call str. It creates and returns a NEW string object. Basically when you call str(something) on an object, this is what really happens:

a = str(someObject)

a = someObject.__str__()

So the str function can basically be thought of as doing this:

def str(variable):
    return variable.__str__()

The same is true when you call list(), tuple(), set() and so on. If what I think you're asking is correct:

tuple(), list(), and set() all call the __iter__() method of a class, so what you'd want to do is:

class MyClass(object):
    ...
    def __iter__(self):
        ...
        return myIterable
share|improve this answer
    
I understand that it's creating and returning a string, but to me, that fits the definition of a class acting as a string. I don't know how it would work otherwise. __iter__ is the closest I've come to an answer so far, but it still requires extra work, like calling iter on it. Maybe I don't have the problem defined well enough in my head yet. –  Gary Fixler May 3 '12 at 1:52
1  
@GaryFixler: You don't have to call __iter__(). Using an instance of A any place that requires an iterable type will call __iter__() implicitly. For example the loop for item in A: is syntax sugar for for item in A.__iter__():. So if you define __iter__(), that's enough to be able to cast instance of A to lists, or use them like lists (though if you want to implement random access, you will have to implement __setitem__() and __getitem__() too.) –  Li-aung Yip May 3 '12 at 1:57
    
@GaryFixler: It doesn't require extra work. list(myObject) implicitly calls myObject.__iter__(), as does any expression that requires an iterator. –  Joel Cornett May 3 '12 at 1:58
1  
@JoelCornett: The hand is quicker than the eye! –  Li-aung Yip May 3 '12 at 1:59
1  
@GaryFixler: Why don't you subclass tuple? –  Joel Cornett May 3 '12 at 2:16

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