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I am writing a small script to help out with Japanese kana memorisation. How would I combine the following lists into one? I tried as follows.

a = ["a",   "i",   "u",   "e",   "o"]
k = ["ka",  "ki",  "ku",  "ke",  "ko"]
g = ["ga",  "gi",  "gu",  "ge",  "go"]
s = ["sa",  "shi", "su",  "se",  "so"]
z = ["za",  "ji",  "zu",  "ze",  "zo"]
t = ["ta",  "chi", "tsu", "te",  "to"]
d = ["da",         "du",  "de",  "do"]
n = ["na",  "ni",  "nu",  "ne",  "no"]
h = ["ha",  "hi",  "hu",  "he",  "ho"]
b = ["ba",  "bi",  "bu",  "be",  "bo"]
p = ["pa",  "pi",  "pu",  "pe",  "po"]
m = ["ma",  "mi",  "mu",  "me",  "mo"]
y = ["ya",         "yu",         "yo"]
n = ["n"]

kana = [a, k, g, s, z, t, d, n, h, b, p, m, y, n]

print kana
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Thanks, I did perform a search for that but couldn't find anything useful. These answers have all been helpful, thank you to everyone! :) –  abkai May 5 '12 at 5:52
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8 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

One way:

kana = a + k + g + s + z + t + d + n + h + b + p + m + y + n
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ideone.com/M9WbM –  dwerner May 3 '12 at 2:16
    
My +1 for this simple and specific case. If the list of lists is given (with unknown content), see my answer with the timeit comparison. –  pepr May 3 '12 at 7:51
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The question is effectively asking how do you flatten that list of lists, which is answered here: join list of lists in python.

You could print out everything by doing something like:

import itertools
print list(itertools.chain(*kana))
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3  
or chain.from_iterable(kana) –  gnibbler May 3 '12 at 3:10
2  
In my opinion, the itertools solution is definitely suitable for those who are used to itertools and who use the module in other code. Otherwise, it is less self-explanatory than using the methods of the basic types. It is also slower -- see the timeit in my answer. –  pepr May 3 '12 at 11:25
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My +1 for the explicit for loop with .extend()

>>> import this
The Zen of Python, by Tim Peters

Beautiful is better than ugly.
Explicit is better than implicit.
...
Readability counts.
...
In the face of ambiguity, refuse the temptation to guess.
...

When measured, the plain for loop is faster than the side-effect by the list comprehension.

import itertools
import timeit

def flattenListOfLists(lst):
    result = []
    for sublist in lst:
        result.extend(sublist)
    return result

def flattenListOfLists2(lst):
    result = []
    [result.extend(sublist) for sublist in lst]  # uggly side effect ;)
    return result

def flattenIterTools(lst):
    return list(itertools.chain(*lst))


a = ["a",   "i",   "u",   "e",   "o"]
k = ["ka",  "ki",  "ku",  "ke",  "ko"]
g = ["ga",  "gi",  "gu",  "ge",  "go"]
s = ["sa",  "shi", "su",  "se",  "so"]
z = ["za",  "ji",  "zu",  "ze",  "zo"]
t = ["ta",  "chi", "tsu", "te",  "to"]
d = ["da",         "du",  "de",  "do"]
n = ["na",  "ni",  "nu",  "ne",  "no"]
h = ["ha",  "hi",  "hu",  "he",  "ho"]
b = ["ba",  "bi",  "bu",  "be",  "bo"]
p = ["pa",  "pi",  "pu",  "pe",  "po"]
m = ["ma",  "mi",  "mu",  "me",  "mo"]
y = ["ya",         "yu",         "yo"]
n = ["n"]

kana = [a, k, g, s, z, t, d, n, h, b, p, m, y, n]

t = timeit.timeit('lst = flattenListOfLists(kana)', 'from __main__ import kana, flattenListOfLists', number=100000)
print 'for loop:', t

t = timeit.timeit('lst = flattenListOfLists2(kana)', 'from __main__ import kana, flattenListOfLists2', number=100000)
print 'list comprehension side effect:', t

t = timeit.timeit('lst = flattenIterTools(kana)', 'from __main__ import kana, flattenIterTools\nimport itertools', number=100000)
print 'itertools:', t

It prints on my console:

for loop: 0.389831948464
list comprehension side effect: 0.468136159616
itertools: 0.620626692887

Anyway, the time is for repeating the same 100 thousands times. The readability counts is my argument.

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kana = sum([a, k, g, s, z, t, d, n, h, b, p, m, y, n], [])
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1  
Using sum() with lists has quadratic performance. It will created a brand new list each time it adds another list –  gnibbler May 3 '12 at 3:09
    
Isn't that the case with the '+' operator too? –  spinlok May 3 '12 at 3:11
1  
@spinlok yes, + and sum are equivalently bad for this. The best way is using itertools.chain, per @JackKelly and @gnibbler , which doesn't build any intermediate lists. –  lvc May 3 '12 at 4:01
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kana = [a, k, g, s, z, t, d, n, h, b, p, m, y, n]
combined_list=[]
for x in kana:
    combined_list.extend(x) 
print(combined_list)

['a', 'i', 'u', 'e', 'o', 'ka', 'ki', 'ku', 'ke', 'ko', 'ga', 'gi', 'gu', 'ge', 'go', 'sa', 'shi', 'su', 'se', 'so', 'za', 'ji', 'zu', 'ze', 'zo', 'ta', 'chi', 'tsu', 'te', 'to', 'da', 'du', 'de', 'do', 'n', 'ha', 'hi', 'hu', 'he', 'ho', 'ba', 'bi', 'bu', 'be', 'bo', 'pa', 'pi', 'pu', 'pe', 'po', 'ma', 'mi', 'mu', 'me', 'mo', 'ya', 'yu', 'yo', 'n']
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1  
Using a list comprehension for a side-effect is generally considered unpythonic –  gnibbler May 3 '12 at 3:07
    
@gnibbler you're right, but I just used it here because list comprehensions are fast. –  Aशwini चhaudhary May 3 '12 at 3:30
    
Really? Did you time the LC vs a for loop? –  gnibbler May 3 '12 at 4:45
1  
for x in kana:combined_list.extend(x) is 20% faster than the LC on my computer –  gnibbler May 3 '12 at 11:01
    
@Ashwini Chaudhary: "In the face of ambiguity, refuse the temptation to guess." ;) I agree with gnibbler, but I think that this is a valuable example to learn from. I am not going to up-vote, but I am not going to donw-vote either. The side effects should be avoided (if possible) not only in Python. –  pepr May 3 '12 at 11:31
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One should also be aware of one very important fact, that the flattened list shares the original objects with the original list of lists. This is not a problem in this case, as the objects are immutable strings. If the objects were mutable, changing them in one structure would change the element value observable via the second structure.

To summarize, one have to know a bit more about Python internals. Sometimes we want to make a copy of the original sublists, like that:

...
result = []
for sublist in lst:
    result.extend(sublist[:])     # notice the [:] here
...
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The following is a list comprehension with so_on being used as a short-cut just in the example to represent the actual remaining lists that you want to combine.

The long way:

>>> `all_list = [e for l in [a, k, so_on] for e in l]`
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Other way with lambda

kana = [a, k, g, s, z, t, d, n, h, b, p, m, y, n]

reduce(lambda x,y: x+y,kana)
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