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So I'm getting into using the Python API in maya and some tools require me to iterate code over various objects. This requires attaching an object reference with it's name to an object creator's output, and then running a function immediately after it's called.

Rather than running (hypothetical example):

className.myObject1 = mayaClass.create(myObject1)
func1()
func2()

className.myObject2 = mayaClass.create(myObject2)
func1()
func2()

etc..

is there a way I could say do this:

myObjs = ['myObject1','myObject2','myObject3']
for obj in myObjs:
    className.obj = mayaClass.create(obj)
    func1()
    func2()

It would certainly save a lot of typing, shrink down the script size and make things more easily maintainable.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

setattr() will set a object's attribute (given by a string) to the specified value
vars() will get the local variables as a dictionary

Have a look at http://docs.python.org/library/functions.html for important builtins of Python

myObjs = ['myObject1','myObject2','myObject3']

for obj in myObjs:
    setattr(className, obj, mayaClass.create(vars()[objs]))
    func1()
    func2()

EDIT: I noticed also another answer mentions exec. Be careful when using this in any python code .

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Thanks that works great. –  Dhruv Govil May 3 '12 at 20:45

setattr()

The function assigns the value to the attribute, provided the object allows it. For example, setattr(x, 'foobar', 123) is equivalent to x.foobar = 123.

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c'mon, you can elaborate your answer at least a tiny little bit more –  juliomalegria May 3 '12 at 3:53
    
@julio.alegria: Better? –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams May 3 '12 at 4:03
    
well, I guess everyone has their own style –  juliomalegria May 3 '12 at 5:12

in addition to the setattr() answer by Ignacio, i would also like to mention the possibilty to use the exec() statement. This allows you to execute strings as python code in the current scope.

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