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I'm pretty new to Python and I'm trying to write a program that will do a 4-point linear interpolation reading data from a .txt file and asking for user information.

The .txt file has temperature and pressures in a table with this format:

T    P1  P2  P3  P4
     80,100,150,200
75,  400,405,415,430
100, 450,456,467,483
150, 500,507,519,536
200, 550,558,571,589

And here's the code:

# User input
temp = input("Enter temperature value in degrees Celcius [Range: 75-200]:")
pressure = input("Enter pressure value in bars [Range: 80-589")

temp = float(temp)
pressure = float(pressure)

# Opens file and read data
filename = open('xxxxxxxxxxxxx.txt', 'r').readlines()

# Removes \n from each line
for i in list(range((len(filename)-1))):
    filename[i] = filename[i][:-1]

# Splits string
for i in list(range(len(filename))):
    filename[i] = filename[i].split(',')

# Converts string numbers into decimal numbers
for i in [2,3,4,5,6]:
    filename[i][0] = float(filename[i][0])
    filename[i][1] = float(filename[i][1])

I'm not sure where to go from here. If the user input was say, T=100 and P=200, how would I locate the data points from the file that are directly before and after those numbers?

Obviously, I don't know much about what I'm doing, but I would appreciate any help.

ETA: Actual table values. Also, I was not clear on the actual problem statement. Given a temperature and pressure, the program should perform an linear interpolation to find U (internal energy). The T values are the first column, the P values the first row, and the rest are U values.

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Since whitespace is significant in Python, please make sure the original indentation is preserved when you paste code. –  dbaupp May 3 '12 at 4:46
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3 Answers

Assuming you have a sorted list of numbers, x1, x2, x3... xn, you could use the bisect module for fast location of the interval you want (O(log n)).

from bisect import bisect, bisect_right, bisect_left
#    0    1    2    3    4    5    6    7
x = [1,   2,   4,   8,  16, 100, 200, 300]


def find_interval(x,y):
    # x must be a sorted list.

    index = bisect_left(x,y)
    # Larger than largest element in x
    if index >= len(x):
        l,r = -1, None
    # Exactly equal to something in x
    elif y == x[index]:
        l,r = index, index
    # Smaller than smallest element in x
    elif index == 0:
        l,r = None, 0
    # Inbetween two elements in x
    else:
        l,r = index-1, index

    print (x[l] if l != None else "To left of all elements")
    print (x[r] if r != None else "To right of all elements")
    return (l,r)

>>> x
[1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 100, 200, 300]
>>> find_interval(x,0)
To left of all elements
1
>>> find_interval(x,1000)
300
To right of all elements
>>> find_interval(x,100)
100
100
>>> find_interval(x,12)
8
16
>>> 
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  1. Using .readlines() will shoot you in the foot as soon as the file gets big. Can you formulate what you need to do in terms of

    for line in open(...):
        # parse line
    

    and parse the file just once without loading it fully into memory.

    • Much better still, would be to use the with idiom when working with files:

      with open(...) as file:
          for line in file:
              # parse line
      

      This saves you a bit of headaches when there is a problem while working with the file.

  2. You don't need to strip newlines if you will end up using float() to make a float out of a string. float('1.2 \t\n') is perfectly valid code.

  3. for i in list(range(len(filename))):

    This is bad style. The Python idiom for iterating through a list is

    for element in list:
    

    If you need an index into the list, then you should use

    for i, element in enumerate(list):
    

    Your approach is sort-of "manual" and it works, but creating a list out of a list (coming from range(...) in python 2.x) is completely unnecessary. A better "manual" alternative to your code would be

    for i in xrange(len(filename)):
    

    but it is still much less readable than the idioms above.

Now that I'm done bashing on your code, the main question is: what [the hell] do you actually need done? Can you give us the exact, word-for-word, specification of the problem you are trying to solve?

  • Have you looked at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linear_interpolation?
  • What is the significance of the input data from the terminal in your case?
  • Why and what for do you need the data from the file that is just before and after the input data from the terminal?
  • Is the temperature/pressure data somehow sorted?
  • What do the lines in the file represent (e.g. are they time-based or location-based or something else)?
  • What do the four different pressures represent?
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I was not clear on the actual problem statement. Given a temperature and pressure, the program should perform an linear interpolation to find U (internal energy). The T values are the first column, the P values the first row, and the rest are U values. I updated with the actual values in the table. Sorry for all the confusion and thanks for the help. –  LC4Tigers May 4 '12 at 0:54
    
@LC4Tigers: So you need a 2D interpolation? –  Li-aung Yip May 4 '12 at 10:41
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There are two separate questions here: how to read data into python / NumPy, and how to do 2d interpolatation.
For reading data, I'd suggest numpy loadtxt,
and for interpolation, scipy BivariateSpline. (They both have more options than you need.)

from __future__ import division
from cStringIO import StringIO
import numpy as np
from scipy.interpolate import RectBivariateSpline

np.set_printoptions( 1, threshold=100, edgeitems=10, suppress=True )

    # a file inline, for testing --
myfile = StringIO( """
# T  P1  P2  P3  P4
0,   80,100,150,200

75,  400,405,415,430
100, 450,456,467,483
150, 500,507,519,536
200, 550,558,571,589
""" )

    # file -> numpy array --
    # (all rows must have the same number of columns)
TPU = np.loadtxt( myfile, delimiter="," )
P = TPU[0,1:]  # top row
T = TPU[ 1:,0]  # left col
U = TPU[1:,1:]  # 4 x 4, 400 .. 589
print "T:", T
print "P:", P
print "U:", U

interpolator = RectBivariateSpline( T, P, U, kx=1, ky=1 )  # 1 bilinear, 3 spline

    # try some t, p --
for t, p in (
    (75, 80),
    (75, 200),
    (87.5, 90),
    (200, 80),
    (200, 90),
    ):
    u = interpolator( t, p )
    print "t %5.1f  p %5.1f -> u %5.1f" % (t, p, u)

By the way, for interactive python, IPython makes it easy to try single lines, look at variables ...

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