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I am trying to run through a series of checks/inserts into a MySQL 5.5 db, but I am having frequent yet intermittent issues with SIGSEGV errors. Over the course of many queries being executed, the SELECT statements run just fine. However, after some variable amount of time or number of executed queries (sometimes thousands of checks, sometimes 1 or 2, sometimes not at all and the program exits normally), I inexplicably get a segfault...

Program received signal SIGSEGV, Segmentation fault.
0x100188a8 in mysql_send_query () from K:\Programming\C\Test\libmysql.dll
(gdb) bt full
#0  0x100188a8 in mysql_send_query () from K:\Programming\C\Test\libmysql.dll
No symbol table info available.
#1  0x100188e5 in mysql_real_query () from K:\Programming\C\Test\libmysql.dll
No symbol table info available.
#2  0x00000000 in ?? ()
No symbol table info available.
(gdb)

This is from my heavily reduced code:

int main() {

    for (int i = 0; i < 5000; i++) {
        int iNewX = GenerateRandomInt(1, 50);
        int iNewY = GenerateRandomInt(1, 50);
        std::string str = "SELECT * FROM Resources WHERE XPOS = ";
        str = str + 
            StatToString(iNewX) + " AND YPOS = " + 
            StatToString(iNewY) + ";";

        const char * Query = str.c_str();

        MYSQL *connect;
        connect=mysql_init(NULL);
        connect=mysql_real_connect(connect,SERVER,USER,PASSWORD,DATABASE,0,NULL,0);
            // Print SQL statment for debugging only...
            // This appears to always be good, even in the case of the segfault.
        std::cout << Query << std::endl; 
        if (mysql_query(connect, Query)) {
                // Supposed to log an error; I don't get this far...
                // This does work when I intentionally break the statement.
                            std::cout << printf("Failed to SELECT, Error: %s", mysql_error(connect));
                std::cout << printf("Query: %s", Query) << std::endl;
                mysql_close(connect);
            return 0;
        }
        mysql_close(connect);

    }

    return 1;

}

I have been unsuccessful in searching online for a case that really matches what I have going on here (though there are lots of MySQL/segfault related forum/Q+A topics/threads). Since this appears to be happening within the .dll itself, how can I fix this?

Can anyone explain why the issue seems to come and go?

I have not yet tried to reinstall MySQL, as that will likely be a very big headache that I would rather avoid. If I must, then I must.

If I am missing any details in my question or any pertinent code, please let me know and I will add.


After following Christian.K's advice, I was able to see that this was error 23 (as returned by mysql_error(connect)) after connect=mysql_init(NULL).

This led me to a few resources, most clearly, this one. This says that this is a know problem when working within Windows, and there's not much I can do about this.

share|improve this question
    
A couple of things: check the return value of mysql_init and especially mysql_real_connect. The later returns NULL in case of an error. I'm no expert for MySQL, but maybe mysql_query doesn't like being passed a null pointer as first argument. Also, cout << printf is somewhat strange. Do you really wanted to first print the message (printf) and then number of characters of it (which is the return value of printf) - although that shouldn't case the SIGSEGV. –  Christian.K May 3 '12 at 5:00
    
@Christian.K Actually, that error trapping was picked up off an online tutorial, but thanks for the info. Do you suggest something like if (connect != NULL) {...} after these lines? Even so, I still don't understand why it DOES work many, many times before I have any issues. –  Gaffi May 3 '12 at 5:03
    
Yes, that is what I would suggest. It could be that the connect sometimes fails (for whatever reason, maybe mysql_error() helps here as well), and then NULL is returned and passed to mysql_query. But again, handling the error is good style and might help in diagnosing the root cause here. Other than that I have no MySQL knowledge ;-) –  Christian.K May 3 '12 at 5:06
    
@Christian.K I appreciate it. I just threw the NULL checks in and it doesn't run, but at least it doesn't SEGFAULT! Now to trace the mysql_error() info... –  Gaffi May 3 '12 at 5:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You might get around the open file limit (error 23) by not opening a connection for every loop iteration (which is questionable anyway), but rather use one connection for all loop iterations.

Together with my comments about error handling, and the strange cout << printf use you end up with something like this:

int main() {

    MYSQL *connect;
    connect=mysql_init(NULL);

    if (connect == NULL)
    {
       printf("Insufficient memory to initialize.\n");
       return 1;
    }

    connect=mysql_real_connect(connect,SERVER,USER,PASSWORD,DATABASE,0,NULL,0);

    if (connect == NULL)
    {
       printf("Could not connect: %s\n", mysql_error(connect);
       return 1;
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < 5000; i++) {
        int iNewX = GenerateRandomInt(1, 50);
        int iNewY = GenerateRandomInt(1, 50);
        std::string str = "SELECT * FROM Resources WHERE XPOS = ";
        str = str + 
            StatToString(iNewX) + " AND YPOS = " + 
            StatToString(iNewY) + ";";

        const char * Query = str.c_str();

        if (mysql_query(connect, Query)) {
            // Supposed to log an error; I don't get this far...
            // This does work when I intentionally break the statement.
            printf("Failed to SELECT, Error: %s", mysql_error(connect));
            printf("Query: %s", Query);
            mysql_close(connect);

            return 1;
        }
    }

    mysql_close(connect);
    return 0;
}

Note that I also changed the return values. Per convention main() should return 0 on success and something else (mostly 1) otherwise.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks again for your guidance. Again, this is heavily reduced code, and some of the code actually resides in another class/another source file. I would think then that I have to pass the connect as arguments to these functions, correct? Also, I believe I read somewhere that you want to close the connection as soon as it is no longer needed. My code is more a working example, but once fully expanded, the queries will run in a series, then hold off for a while, then start again. Should I just leave the connection open that whole time? –  Gaffi May 3 '12 at 14:08
    
I would use the same connection to process (multiple) statements that logically belong together, even if that means keeping the connection open for a longer time. You should Google / "Ask Question" on SO about the "Unit of Work" pattern to find out more. In general, much more information about the purpose and workings of your application would be required to give sound advice. –  Christian.K May 3 '12 at 14:12
    
For the record, this (so far) works beautifully. I am using a class to actually handle and of the SQL-related functions, and I've added the connect/close calls to the ctor/dtor. Doing so, I've been able to set test runs that last much longer than the original program even calls for. Thank you. –  Gaffi May 4 '12 at 12:21

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