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I am not sure how this will be done in unix can anybody help/suggest to convert 2012-05-03T25:00:00 to 2012-05-04T01:00:00 in Unix command/script

In my file I have more than one occurrence with different times those needs to converted to next day

2012-05-03T25:00:00 to 2012-05-04T01:00:00
2012-05-03T26:50:00 to 2012-05-04T02:50:00
2012-05-03T31:59:59 to 2012-05-04T07:59:59

etc

I tried it but somehow sed is not working

Date.txt

2009-09-12T05:18:@00@+10:00,D,
2009-09-12T05:24:00+10:00,2009-09-12T05:24:@00@+10:00,D,
2009-09-12T05:25:00+10:00,2009-09-12T05:25:@00@+10:00,D,
2009-09-12T05:27:00+10:00,2009-09-12T05:27:@00@+10:00,D,
2009-09-12T30:29:00+10:00,2009-09-12T05:29:@00@+10:00,D,
2009-09-12T29:31:00+10:00,2009-09-12T05:31:@00@+10:00,D,
2009-09-12T28:33:00+10:00,,D,
2009-09-12T27:00:@00@+10:00,U,
2009-09-12T26:01:00+10:00,2009-09-12T05:01:@00@+10:00,U,
2009-09-12T24:04:00+10:00,2009-09-12T05:04:@00@+10:00,U,
2009-09-12T24:59:59+10:00,2009-09-12T05:06:@00@+10:00,U,
2009-09-12T30:08:00+10:00,2009-09-12T05:08:@00@+10:00,U,
2009-09-12T31:59:59+10:00,2009-09-12T05:10:@00@+10:00,U,
2009-09-12T05:17:00+10:00,,U,
2009-09-12T25:25:@00@+10:00,D,

script.sh

awk -F"T" -v OFS=',' '{print $1}' date.txt > tmpdate
uniq -d tmpdate > tmpuniq
rm tmpdate
date1=`cat tmpuniq`
date2=`date --set="$date1" +%F`
date3=$(date --date="$date2" -d "+1 day" +"%F")
T1=$date2+"T24"
T2=$date3+"T00"
echo $T1
echo $T2
dos2unix date.txt
#sed -i 's/$T1/$T2/g' date.txt > test.txt
#sed -i 's/"$T1"/"$T2"/g' date.txt > test.txt
sed -i 's/'$T1'/'$T2'/g' date.txt

Any help much appreciated

share|improve this question
    
Hi Robert,its not an error that's the way our system generates the files –  user790049 May 3 '12 at 5:04
    
Why would the hour 25 be converted to the next day at hour 00? I would expect that 24 would be converted to 00 and 25 to 01. –  Greg Hewgill May 3 '12 at 5:07
    
Hi Greg, oops I did a mistake thanks I will update it –  user790049 May 3 '12 at 5:08
1  
Do you have a time: 2012-05-35T987:224:1562? –  kev May 3 '12 at 23:49
    
What are those @ signs doing in the data file? –  Mark Reed May 4 '12 at 0:49

4 Answers 4

If you have Tcl on your system, the clock command makes it pretty easy:

set t 2012-05-03T31:59:59
lassign [split $t T] date time
lassign [split $time :] hour min sec
set base [clock scan $date -format %Y-%m-%d]
set new [clock add $base $hour hours $min minutes $sec seconds]
puts [clock format $new -format %Y-%m-%dT%T]   ;# -> 2012-05-04T07:59:59

Update for cygwin:

first, using the cygwin installer, install the version 8.5.x of the "tcl" package (located in the Interpreters category). Then, you can do this

normalize_time() {
    printf '
        lassign [split "%s" T] date time
        lassign [split $time :] hour min sec
        set base [clock scan $date -format %%Y-%%m-%%d]
        set new [clock add $base $hour hours $min minutes $sec seconds]
        puts [clock format $new -format %%Y-%%m-%%dT%%T]
    ' "$1" | tclsh
}
normalize_time 2012-05-03T31:59:59 
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Glenn, I am using cygwin not sure how to use Tcl. –  user790049 May 3 '12 at 21:17

finally I got a solution with a bug (if date is last day of the month then this will not work but I can live with that)

and did a clumsy job

date1=`cat date.txt | awk -F. '{print substr($1,1,10)}'|uniq |head -1`
echo $date1
date2=$date1"T24"
date21=$date1"T25"
date22=$date1"T26"
date23=$date1"T27"
date24=$date1"T28"
date25=$date1"T29"
date26=$date1"T30"
date27=$date1"T31"
date3=$(date --date="$date1" -d "+1 day" +"%F")
echo $date2
cat date.txt | grep "$date2"
tmpdate=`echo $date1 | sed -e 's/-//g'`
echo $tmpdate
date4=`echo $(date -d $(echo \`expr $tmpdate + 1\`F) +"%F")`
echo $date4
date41=$date4"T00"
date42=$date4"T01"
date43=$date4"T02"
date44=$date4"T03"
date45=$date4"T04"
date46=$date4"T05"
date47=$date4"T06"
date48=$date4"T07"

sed -i 's/'$date2'/'$date41'/g' date.txt
sed -i 's/'$date21'/'$date42'/g' date.txt
sed -i 's/'$date22'/'$date43'/g' date.txt
sed -i 's/'$date23'/'$date44'/g' date.txt
sed -i 's/'$date24'/'$date45'/g' date.txt
sed -i 's/'$date25'/'$date46'/g' date.txt
sed -i 's/'$date26'/'$date47'/g' date.txt
sed -i 's/'$date27'/'$date48'/g' date.txt

If anyone wants to improve this script please go ahead.

Once again thanks to all.

share|improve this answer

You will basically need to parse the erroneous time specification, convert everything to seconds, add it back together, and convert it back to a proper date.

date -d "date" +%s produces seconds since January 1, 1970. date -d @1234567890 converts a date in this format back to a regular human-readable date.

#!/bin/sh

IFS=T:

while read date hh mm ss; do
    basedate=$(date -d "$date" +%s)
    date -d @$(echo "$basedate+($hh*60*60)+($mm*60)+$ss" | bc) +%FT%T
done <<EOF
    2012-05-03T25:00:00
    2012-05-03T26:50:00
    2012-05-03T31:59:59
EOF

I didn't have bc on this computer so I replaced my original attempt with a small awk script, but it's not very readable.

awk 'END { print '"$basedate"'+('"$hh"'*60*60)+('"$mm"'*60)+'"$ss"'}' </dev/null

If you don't have a recent enough version of GNU date, you can find some alternative ways at http://www.antonolsen.com/2006/04/06/bash-convert-unix-timestamp-to-a-date/

share|improve this answer

First, use cat 'yourfile' to open it. Then do a loop on each line. Then use grep and cut. That's really simple to do and the most efficient way for you to learn is to go through the man pages of cat, grep, and cut.
Hope it'll help.

share|improve this answer
4  
None of these programs have any logic for calculating dates. They can remove uninteresting information, but not add interesting information. And the guidance to use catis just plain useless. partmaps.org/era/unix/award.html –  tripleee May 3 '12 at 10:14
    
I thought he just wanted modify a file by hand. I didn't tink he wanted to calculate dates. But now you say that, it's true that there must be a logical way to calculate the dates, simply removing the hour and increment the date would be non-sens. –  Depado May 3 '12 at 11:57
    
guys, I am still struggling.I posted my work any help much appreciated –  user790049 May 3 '12 at 23:43

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