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I know this is simple, but I just can't figure it out. I'm creating a Class, My functions is what giving me the problem. I'm using O'Reilly's C# 3.0 as a reference.

I created a class:

class Runner
{
    public double miles = 0;

    public double RunMiles
    {
        get { return miles; }
        set
        {
            if ((value > 2)&&(value <7))
            {
                this.miles = value;
            } 
        }
    }

    public void StartRun ()
    {      
        // here, I want to enable the runner to start running, Make him start running//if that makes any sense.
    }

    public void VerifyMiles ()
    {
        // enter code here//I want to verify the miles are set.
    }
}
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10  
very confused... what exactly do you think should happen in StartRun or VerifyMiles, in words? also - why, if I set RunMiles = 22;, would it be silently ignored? what exactly do you mean by "test the property and enable it" ? –  Marc Gravell May 3 '12 at 7:00
1  
I know you're new to this site and to programming in C#, but this question is very hard to answer the way it is currently written. Please add more information to the question to make it less open ended. The questions Marc asked are a good starting point. If you edit your question to include the information he is asking about, it would help out people who want to give you answers. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham May 3 '12 at 7:08
    
the problem here is you are not stating at all what is the question to which you are seeking an answer. moreover, there are few conceptual mistakes in your question i feel. properties are set after creating class and not vice versa. also only if u enable something u can test it. dont worry, properties are enabled by default, all you have to is get a handle for that property - meaning u got to instantiate an object in memory to have specific values for properties. you can change the values too. for all that u require an instance of your class. tell us if u r unsure how to go about all that –  nawfal May 3 '12 at 23:08
    
@nawfal, I think that is what I am missing and you are right, I do not know how to go about it at all. I'll do some more reading and see what I come up with. –  whoknows May 3 '12 at 23:40
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closed as not a real question by casperOne May 4 '12 at 19:22

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

For OP's comments, some rudimentary stuffs.

Runner r = new Runner(); //you created an instance of type Runner in memory now
int i = r.RunMile; //i is now 0 since variable miles is 0 initially, so RunMiles is also 0

r.RunMiles = 34;
i = r.RunMile; //i is still 0 since variable miles is not affected 'cos of your "if ((value > 2)&&(value <7))" in setter logic

r.RunMiles = 3;
i = r.RunMile; //i is 3 now

To start running you should do something like this:

r.StartRun();

and to verify miles,

r.VerifyMiles();


public void StartRun ()
{     
    miles++; //your logic here
}

public void VerifyMiles ()
{
    if (miles > 26.22)
       //print successfully completed one round of marathon
    else
       //he died in the meanwhile :(..
}

This is how you basically do stuff in OOP

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1  
lol, Great stuff. Thank you for the example. –  whoknows May 4 '12 at 0:04
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