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I am using libcurl in my project and it depends on openssl and bunch of other .so in runtime. This dependency is kind of pain in the ass, since different distributives/versions may contain different openssl versions.

For example i am experiencing problems running on Ubuntu 11.10 if i compilled my app on Ubuntu 9.10.

I am seeing two options how to solve this but none of them aren't good enough for my case:

  1. package my app and let package manager solve this sort of stuff

  2. link all deps statically

My app is really tiny and package/maintain it would be overkill. Plus, one of the requirements is that it should be download-and-run'able. So, (1) is not an opton for me.

Static link (2) would be not-bad solution but it seems that there is no static binary distributions of libopenssl, libcrypto and other transitive dependencies that come with libcurl.

Theoretically i could try to build all that zoo of libs behind libcurl manually, but it seems that this will make maintenance much more complicated.

So, here is the question - am i missing something? Is there a less painful way to do what i want in linux world (Ubuntu to be specific) with less pain? Any suggestions are welcomed.

Thanks.

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If you are not using a lot of libcurl functions, you can write the simple GET, POST calls your self and parse the HTTP response manually. You will easily find sample code on how to parse this data. –  Vikram.exe May 3 '12 at 7:30
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I can't imagine there are any more than three or four libraries if you're not using a GUI. And the two libraries you mentioned: libcurl and openssl - are pretty good about backward compatibility. Q: Are you sure there's really a problem here? –  paulsm4 May 3 '12 at 7:34
    
If it's a tiny app, it could be written in Python, where these libraries are standard and versioning is less of an issue. –  Maxim Egorushkin May 3 '12 at 7:36
    
Actually, i can't. Well, at least it would be not as cheap as it seems. The thing is that this app is cross-platform and should be able to work on windows/linux/mac and i need libcurl for as an abstraction layer. Plus, i need not only plain HTTP but also HTTPS and this makes things a bit more complicated. –  Eugeny Loy May 3 '12 at 7:36
    
Python and other things that require vm is not an option. App is cross-platform and forcing windows user to instal vm is not somenting i can afford. –  Eugeny Loy May 3 '12 at 7:39

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I am using libcurl in my project and it depends on openssl and bunch of other .so in runtime. This dependency is kind of pain in the ass, since different distributives/versions may contain different openssl versions.

For example i am experiencing problems running on Ubuntu 11.10 if i compilled my app on Ubuntu 9.10.

First up, what is the problem with this? You shouldn't have problems if you're moving up from an older version of Ubuntu to a newer one. If I'm not mistaken, you only need to specify which minimum version of a library you need and the package manager should be able to install a suitable version. Newer versions of libraries should not break existing apps unless you're using deprecated features.

My app is really tiny and package/maintain it would be overkill. Plus, one of the requirements is that it should be download-and-run'able. So, (1) is not an opton for me.

For Linux (especially Ubuntu, Fedora and other top distros), packaging is really the way to distribute your application. Download-install-run is a Windows thing and it's not the way people on Linux install software (well, people new to Linux might...)

You should also try for distro acceptance which will reduce your burden over time. The first step towards this, atleast on Ubuntu, is to create your own PPA (https://help.launchpad.net/Packaging/PPA).

Static link (2) would be not-bad solution but it seems that there is no static binary distributions of libopenssl, libcrypto and other transitive dependencies that come with libcurl.

This is usually a very very bad thing to do. Static linking or just bundling the library with your app puts the burden of updating it on you and there are implications if you don't update those. So, I don't recommend this approach. See here for more details: http://www.dwheeler.com/blog/2012/04/03/#insecure-libraries

Here is Fedora's policy: http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Packaging:No_Bundled_Libraries

So, here is the question - am i missing something? Is there a less painful way to do what i want in linux world (Ubuntu to be specific) with less pain? Any suggestions are welcomed.

There really are two things to do here: 1. Packaging: Ideally, this'll be deb for Ubuntu/Debian and rpm for Fedora/Suse. The other popular alternative is to use autotools (autoconf/automake) so that the user can build your application with the required pre-reqs. The last option is to provide just a Makefile and a README and expect your users to do the right thing. 2. Distribution: Ideally, this is with the distro repositories. Ubuntu PPA is a good starting point. Alternative is to host the binaries/packages on your own site.

Most popular applications provide both a .deb/.rpm for the popular Linux distros as well as .tar.gz with autotools for building on distros that have a different packaging system.

In the end, let me ask you this: is your focus on making it less painful for you to provide your application, or making it less painful for your users to obtain your application?

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Thanks for the great rely. About libcurl and versions of Ubuntu: this was caused because i've tried to link statically with libcurl only (not transitive deps). As a result: some of these deps were not present in the versions that statically linked libcurl wanted. –  Eugeny Loy May 7 '12 at 11:13
    
About static builds: yeah, i've digged a bit deeply and now i see that this is somenthing that suits windows but not the way i should follow on linux. I am studying how to package deb packages in my toolchain now, so it is a great chance that this will be my final solution. –  Eugeny Loy May 7 '12 at 11:16
    
And the about the last question: actually - I am searching for compromise. There is a great chance that this tool will be updated once per century, so supporting this by other devs (maybe not me) should be as easy as possible. On the other hand - this tool should be as easy and light as possible, so user experience is important too (i would probably be more comfortable with packages, but i havent seen many non-dev linux users in the wild, and this is why i had doubds about packaging). –  Eugeny Loy May 7 '12 at 11:24

There is a third option:

Create an archive of some sort that fits your needs and include the .so/.dll files you need, depending on platform. A ZIP archive should work for both Linux and Windows.

Then use LD_LIBRARY_PATH in a wrapper script for your Linux installation (which lets you place your .so files in some special place, typically in a libs directory). Windows, as far as I know, uses CWD as the first place to look for .dll files that are needed by a binary so all you need to do is place them in the same directory as the binary and you're good to go.

Using this method, you get to keep your "distribution" small and there is no need for static linking or any other special handling.

Just make sure that you analyze the actual dependency chain for your .so/.dll files as to not get surprised when some unintended library gets loaded in the target environment.

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a wrapper batch file for windows will work aswell, it would need something like this: pastebin.com/eqfgNUwa –  smerlin May 3 '12 at 10:18
    
Hmmm. Yup, this seems to be an option. However, looks a bit fragile and still require some effort. I am still in doubt, but i guess i'll try to do static build and if things will turn bad i'll fallback to this one. Thanks. –  Eugeny Loy May 3 '12 at 10:35

Did you consider using qt? You simply would not have those problems there, and they have powerful and rmeasy support of ssl and http

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Yup, i've thought about it but it will make app much more heavier than i can afford. Qt adds ~50mb only for QtCore and dunno how many for QtNetwork. Not to mention that I wont be able to link all statically into one fat exe due to their licensing policy. –  Eugeny Loy May 3 '12 at 7:48
    
Thats not true. You are able to link in one exe. Also you would not need to deploy the dlls, the package manager could handle that for you. Also the dlls can be smaller if needed. I can provide you with some help for buildimg qt statically or building small, usable qt libs if needed –  muma May 3 '12 at 7:50
    
Plus, it seems that there is no out-of-the-box support of HTTPS. At least at a glance. –  Eugeny Loy May 3 '12 at 7:51
    
This should work in combination with open ssl as far as i know. –  muma May 3 '12 at 7:52
    
Well, I do physically can link with Qt statically but... It will cost me some money if I want to complain their license (and i do), plus there is no package manager for windows, plus package manager is not an option as i've mentioned in question post. –  Eugeny Loy May 3 '12 at 7:56

So you ask "Is there a less painful way." I like the other answers, particularly Naveen's answer. So you have two solutions

  1. Use the .so files (shared libraries) in the operating system and recommend to your users that they use "at least version x." That'll pretty much take care of everything.

  2. Bundle either non-shared (static) libraries -- the .a files -- with your application or bundle shared libraries -- the .so files -- with your application.

The static .a files are pretty simple to build from the source using the ./configure scripts. The .so files you can easily get, but you'll require quite a trick to bundle them with your application. The .so files can be patched; they have paths inside saying from where dependencies should be loaded. So bundling .so files isn't impossible and might even be a handy way of avoiding the manual steps of building .a files for a series of dependencies -- if you find and use the scripts for relocating the .so files.

You write:

Theoretically i could try to build all that zoo of libs behind libcurl manually, but it seems that this will make maintenance much more complicated.

Yes, it will, because you'll want security patches as they come out, right? So the best method is #1 -- to let the user install the latest versions he can get his hands upon and take the responsibility to make his system secure.

Solution #2 is handy when you hit a situation where you are doing custom work for a customer who cannot use solution #1. Here you provide periodic releases of your software on a schedule, including the latest dependencies with all their fixes. Small software usually gets to a point where it just stops needing changes. This solution is not a good solution for a small piece of software because you're software isn't changing but you're still making periodic releases simply because the dependencies have updates. So don't use this solution unless your customer actually requires it. It is more expensive in the long run.

Hope this helps!

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