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I'm working on a fit program for SIP data right now. Unfortunately the data comes within a csv table with the following structure :

       f;      Abs(Zm);     Std(Abs);      Phi(Zm);     Std(Phi);       Re(Zm);       Im(Zm);     Time [s]
1.0000000e-001;    7712.6262;       0.0247;    -0.003774;     0.000001;    7712.5713;     -29.1074;   3418623040
2.0000000e-001;    7712.4351;       0.0030;    -0.007543;     0.000001;    7712.2157;     -58.1732;   3418623056
5.0000000e-001;    7710.8455;       0.0094;    -0.018837;     0.000002;    7709.4775;    -145.2434;   3418623063
1.0000000e+000;    7705.3763;       0.0098;    -0.037637;     0.000000;    7699.9195;    -289.9395;   3418623067
2.0000000e+000;    7683.8120;       0.0241;    -0.075058;     0.000001;    7662.1778;    -576.1935;   3418623069
5.0000000e+000;    7539.7945;       0.0080;    -0.184724;     0.000002;    7411.5201;   -1384.8720;   3418623071
1.0000000e+001;    7088.6894;       0.0060;    -0.351521;     0.000001;    6655.2169;   -2440.8206;   3418623072


         f;     Abs(Z12);     Phi(Z12);     Abs(Z34);     Phi(Z34);     Abs(Z14);     Phi(Z14);     Time [s]
1.0000000e-001;       1.7821;     3.139014;       0.2545;    -3.141592;    7710.5896;    -0.003774;   3418623040
2.0000000e-001;       1.7850;     3.133381;       0.2572;    -3.126220;    7710.3930;    -0.007543;   3418623056
5.0000000e-001;       1.7755;     3.121223;       0.2514;    -3.133763;    7708.8186;    -0.018838;   3418623063
1.0000000e+000;       1.7683;     3.100815;       0.2503;     3.139466;    7703.3580;    -0.037638;   3418623067
2.0000000e+000;       1.8091;     3.058834;       0.2538;    -3.123705;    7681.7502;    -0.075060;   3418623069
5.0000000e+000;       1.5547;     2.943611;       0.2398;    -3.136317;    7538.0045;    -0.184727;   3418623071

I'm using a numpy.loadtxt() routine to collect the data from the table like this :

def load_datafile(filename):
try:
     x_data, y_data = numpy.loadtxt(filename , unpack=True, usecols=(0,1),) 
except IOError:
    print('There was an error opening the file: {0}'.format(filename))
    x_data=[]
    y_data=[]
return x_data, y_data

I know there is no further identifier for using a specific block from a table in the loadtxt() command. But is there a handy workaround?

Otherwise is there a simple script which can do the rearranging of the csv-input file to single block colums?

Thanks in advance! Greets, Gunnar

share|improve this question
    
Could you clarify what you mean by a "block"? –  wim May 3 '12 at 7:45
    
your example data has different columns in every block and the block size is different from block to block (7 rows in the first, 6 in the second). Is that true? Do you need to read the data from every block and every column? –  bmu May 3 '12 at 9:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could first split the input data into blocks, then use loadtxt or genfromtxt (I prefer this one, because it has an option to read headers).

from numpy import genfromtxt
from StringIO import StringIO

def read_by_block(filename):
    blocks = []
    data = open(filename).read()
    for blk in data.split('\n\n'): # we assume that blocks are separated by two newlines
        blocks.append(genfromtxt(StringIO(blk), delimiter=';', names=True))
    return blocks

data = read_by_block('data.txt')

print data[0].dtype.names # print fields for first block
print data[0]['StdPhi'] # print column 'Std(Phi)' in 1st block
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the idea of genfromtxt(). After manipulating the newline style in my csv table it worked great. –  Gjan May 3 '12 at 15:18
    
If you want more flexibility with respect to newline style, you can also split based on regular expression: re.split. –  François May 4 '12 at 10:00

Assuming like the input there is always a pair of empty newlines, this little script should return a bunch of file objects:

def parseMultiblockCSV(filename):
    original = open(filename, "r")
    newlines = 0
    block = 0
    current = open(filename + "." + str(block), "w")
    for line in original:
        if line == "":
            newlines += 1
        if newlines >= 2:
            current.close()
            block += 1
            current = open(filename + "." + str(block), "w")
        current.write(line)
    current.close()
    files = []
    for n in range(block + 1):
        files.append(open(filename + "." + str(n)))
    return files

If you then needed them both in the same table I assume it has a function to load multiple files in to a single table. Otherwise:

def combineCSVFiles(files, output):
    if len(files) == 1:
        return files[0]
    start = file[0]
    files = file[1:]
    out = open(output, "w")
    for line in start:
        out.write(line)
    for input in files:
        first = false
        for line in input:
        if not first:
            first = true
            continue
        out.write(line)
    out.close()
    return open(output, "r")

That should return a file object containing the concatenated contents of the given file objects, ignoring the first header line of anything but the first file.

share|improve this answer
    
I think the columns are different from block to block, so your answer do no not handle that. Or do I miss something? –  bmu May 3 '12 at 9:33

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