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Consider the following class member:

std::vector<sim_mob::Lane *>  IncomingLanes_;

the above container shall store the pointer to some if my Lane objects. I don't want the subroutins using this variable as argument, to be able to modify Lane objects. At the same time, I don't know where to put 'const' keyword that does not stop me from populating the container.

could you please help me with this?

thank you and regards vahid

Edit: Based on the answers i got so far(Many Thanks to them all) Suppose this sample:

#include <vector>
#include<iostream>
using namespace std;

class Lane
{
private:
    int a;
public:
    Lane(int h):a(h){}
    void setA(int a_)
    {
        a=a_;
    }
    void printLane()
    {
        std::cout << a << std::endl;
    }
};

class B
{

public:
    vector< Lane const  *> IncomingLanes;
    void addLane(Lane  *l)
    {
        IncomingLanes.push_back(l);
    }

};

int main()
{
    Lane l1(1);
    Lane l2(2);
    B b;
    b.addLane(&l1);
    b.addLane(&l2);
    b.IncomingLanes.at(1)->printLane();
    b.IncomingLanes.at(1)->setA(12);
    return 1;
}

What I meant was:

b.IncomingLanes.at(1)->printLane()

should work on IncomingLanes with no problem AND

b.IncomingLanes.at(1)->setA(12)

should not be allowed.(In th above example none of the two mentioned methods work!)

Beside solving the problem, I am loking for good programming practice also. So if you think there is a solution to the above problem but in a bad way, plase let us all know. Thaks agian

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2  
Just a wild guess... Have you tried std::vector<const sim_mob::Lane *>? –  SJuan76 May 3 '12 at 7:55
1  
Do you want other parts of the code to be able to modify the stored Lane objects? –  Nick May 3 '12 at 7:56
    
@Nick yes I do! only those parts of the code which use member container(IncomingLanes_) should not be allowed to change Lanes mentioned by it. –  rahman May 3 '12 at 8:11
    
@rahman: I am quite amazed that none of the answers so far challenged the pointers requirement. Copying the original object make for much simpler and safer code. I would sincerely recommend a full copy. –  Matthieu M. May 3 '12 at 9:26
1  
@Matthieu: Making a full copy is not a solution, it's a hack. The solution is correct use of const (and maybe references if you really hate pointers that much). –  TonyK May 3 '12 at 9:38

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can do it this way:

std::vector<const sim_mob::Lane *>  IncomingLanes_;

Or this way:

std::vector<sim_mob::Lane const *>  IncomingLanes_;

In C/C++, const typename * and typename const * are identical in meaning.

Updated to address updated question:

If really all you need to do is

b.IncomingLanes.at(1)->printLane()

then you just have to declare printLane like this:

void printLane() const // Tell compiler that printLane doesn't change this
  {
  std::cout << a << std::endl;
  }
share|improve this answer
    
please refer to my question update. As I mentioned above, with your solution, there will be a problem accessing the elements –  rahman May 3 '12 at 8:31
    
@rahman: see my updated response. –  TonyK May 3 '12 at 9:43

A detour first: Use a smart pointer such shared_ptr and not raw pointers within your container. This would make your life a lot easy down the line.

Typically, what you are looking for is called design-const i.e. functions which do not modify their arguments. This, you achieve, by passing arguments via const-reference. Also, if it is a member function make the function const (i.e. this becomes const within the scope of this function and thus you cannot use this to write to the members).

Without knowing more about your class it would be difficult to advise you to use a container of const-references to lanes. That would make inserting lane objects difficult -- a one-time affair, possible only via initializer lists in the ctor(s).

A few must reads:

Edit: code sample:

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
//using namespace std; I'd rather type the 5 characters

// This is almost redundant under the current circumstance
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
#include <memory>
//using namespace std; I'd rather type the 5 characters

// This is almost redundant under the current circumstance
class Lane
{
private:
    int a;
public:
    Lane(int h):a(h){}
    void setA(int a_) // do you need this?
    {
        a=a_;
    }
    void printLane() const // design-const
    {
        std::cout << a << std::endl;
    }
};

class B
{    
    // be consistent with namespace qualification
    std::vector< Lane const * > IncomingLanes; // don't expose impl. details
 public:
    void addLane(Lane const& l) // who's responsible for freeing `l'?
    {
        IncomingLanes.push_back(&l); // would change
    }
    void printLane(size_t index) const
    {
#ifdef _DEBUG 
        IncomingLanes.at( index )->printLane();
#else
        IncomingLanes[ index ]->printLane();
#endif
    }        
};

int main()
{
    Lane l1(1);
    Lane l2(2);
    B b;
    b.addLane(l1);
    b.addLane(l2);
    //b.IncomingLanes.at(1)->printLane(); // this is bad
    //b.IncomingLanes.at(1)->setA(12); // this is bad
    b.printLane(1);

    return 1;
}

Also, as Matthieu M. suggested:

shared ownership is more complicated because it becomes difficult to tell who really owns the object and when it will be released (and that's on top of the performance overhead). So unique_ptr should be the default choice, and shared_ptr a last resort.

Note that unique_ptrs may require you to move them using std::move. I am updating the example to use pointer to const Lane (a simpler interface to get started with).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the info. I gave a sample in the question update. could you now help me out more with it? –  rahman May 3 '12 at 8:37
    
@rahman: I've updated my answer with code and some comments. –  dirkgently May 3 '12 at 8:52
1  
@dirkgently: I would advise against shared_ptr in the general case. unique_ptr is much better. Or here... no pointer at all. –  Matthieu M. May 3 '12 at 9:09
    
@Matthieu M.: Any particular reason? This is a collection and at some point or the other he will have to clear the objects. A smart pointer is just the tool for the job. I can understand if you have reservations about the extra memory footprint for shared_ptrs though. Yes, unique_ptr too is a good choice. –  dirkgently May 3 '12 at 9:39
    
@dirkgently: shared ownership is more complicated because it becomes difficult to tell who really owns the object and when it will be released (and that's on top of the performance overhead). So unique_ptr should be the default choice, and shared_ptr a last resort. –  Matthieu M. May 3 '12 at 9:56

you may declare it like:

std::vector<const sim_mob::Lane *>  IncomingLanes_;

you will be able to add, or remove item from array, but you want be able to change item see bellow

   IncomingLanes_.push_back(someLine); // Ok
   IncomingLanes_[0] = someLine; //error
   IncomingLanes_[0]->some_meber = someting; //error
   IncomingLanes_.erase(IncomingLanes_.end()); //OK
   IncomingLanes_[0]->nonConstMethod(); //error
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. But I need a way to ,at least, reads some values stored in the object(I just want to ban other functions from modifying values).In your example, I need the last line to work(if it is a read only access). Could you look at the edited question? –  rahman May 3 '12 at 8:34
    
You can read any member you want, just implement const getter, e.g. int Line::GetValue() const { return some_int_member }, and then you can call it on const pointer. –  Paskas May 3 '12 at 10:16

I suspect that you want the object to be able to modify the elements (i.e., you don't want the elements to truly be const). Instead, you want nonmember functions to only get read-only access to the std::vector (i.e., you want to prohibit changes from outside the object).

As such, I wouldn't put const anywhere on IncomingLanes_. Instead, I would expose IncomingLanes_ as a pair of std::vector<sim_mob::Lane *>::const_iterators (through methods called something like GetIncomingLanesBegin() and GetIncomingLanesEnd()).

share|improve this answer
1  
"I don't want the subroutins using this variable as argument, to be able to modify Lane objects." –  Karoly Horvath May 3 '12 at 8:13
    
@Max Lybbert but I need IncomingLanes_'s co-member methods to access IncomingLanes_ elements directly(only not to be able to change the elements) –  rahman May 3 '12 at 8:20
1  
@rahman: you have a fundamental problem that whatever you put in a std::vector must be either copyable or movable. You can't make a std::vector or references, or a std::vector of const ints, for example. You're going to go insane trying to get the right kind of const pointers in IncomingLanes_. Even if (some or all) of the class's methods will interact with IncomingLanes_ as read-only data, I would still recommend leaving the elements read-write, and having the methods that read the elements do so through const_iterators. –  Max Lybbert May 3 '12 at 9:05

If you don't want other routines to modify IncomingLanes, but you do want to be able to modify it yourself, just use const in the function declarations that you call.

Or if you don't have control over the functions, when they're external, don't give them access to IncomingLanes directly. Make IncomingLanes private and provide a const getter for it.

share|improve this answer

I don't think what you want is possible without making the pointers stored in the vector const as well.

 const std::vector<sim_mob::Lane*> // means the vector is const, not the pointer within it
 std::vector<const sim_mob::Lane*> // means no one can modify the data pointed at.

At best, the second version does what you want but you will have this construct throughout your code where ever you do want to modify the data:

 const_cast<sim_mob::Lane*>(theVector[i])->non_const_method();

Have you considered a different class hierarchy where sim_mob::Lane's public interface is const and sim_mob::Really_Lane contains the non-const interfaces. Then users of the vector cannot be sure a "Lane" object is "real" without using dynamic_cast?

share|improve this answer

Before we get to const goodness, you should first use encapsulation.

Do not expose the vector to the external world, and it will become much easier.

A weak (*) encapsulation here is sufficient:

class B {
public:
    std::vector<Lane> const& getIncomingLanes() const { return incomingLanes; }

    void addLane(Lane l) { incomlingLanes.push_back(l); }

private:
    std::vector<Lane> incomingLanes;
};

The above is simplissime, and yet achieves the goal:

  • clients of the class cannot modify the vector itself
  • clients of the class cannot modify the vector content (Lane instances)

and of course, the class can access the vector content fully and modify it at will.

Your new main routine becomes:

int main()
{
    Lane l1(1);
    Lane l2(2);
    B b;
    b.addLane(l1);
    b.addLane(l2);
    b.getIncomingLanes().at(1).printLane();
    b.getIncomingLanes().at(1).setA(12); // expected-error\
        // { passing ‘const Lane’ as ‘this’ argument of
        //   ‘void Lane::setA(int)’ discards qualifiers }
    return 1;
}

(*) This is weak in the sense that even though the attribute itself is not exposed, because we give a reference to it to the external world in practice clients are not really shielded.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, did you mean printLane should work and setA shouldn't(as I needed)? I executed your program and none of them worked!? Am I making any mistake? the error is generated for both function calls! –  rahman May 3 '12 at 10:16
    
@rahman: I just realized there is a mistake in the definition of printLane, you should add a const qualifier to the method to inform the compiler that it does not modify the Lane object. Instead of reading void printLane() { ... } is should read void printLane() const { ... }. –  Matthieu M. May 3 '12 at 11:18

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