Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm working with the new version of a third party application. In this version, the database structure is changed, they say "to improve performance".

The old version of the DB had a general structure like this:

TABLE ENTITY
(
    ENTITY_ID,
    STANDARD_PROPERTY_1,
    STANDARD_PROPERTY_2,
    STANDARD_PROPERTY_3,
    ...
)

TABLE ENTITY_PROPERTIES
(
    ENTITY_ID,
    PROPERTY_KEY,
    PROPERTY_VALUE
)

so we had a main table with fields for the basic properties and a separate table to manage custom properties added by user.

The new version of the DB insted has a structure like this:

TABLE ENTITY
(
    ENTITY_ID,
    STANDARD_PROPERTY_1,
    STANDARD_PROPERTY_2,
    STANDARD_PROPERTY_3,
    ...
)

TABLE ENTITY_PROPERTIES_n
(
    ENTITY_ID_n,
    CUSTOM_PROPERTY_1,
    CUSTOM_PROPERTY_2,
    CUSTOM_PROPERTY_3,
    ...
)

So, now when the user add a custom property, a new column is added to the current ENTITY_PROPERTY table until the max number of columns (managed by application) is reached, then a new table is created.

So, my question is: Is this a correct way to design a DB structure? Is this the only way to "increase performances"? The old structure required many join or sub-select, but this structute don't seems to me very smart (or even correct)...

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I have seen this done before on the assumed (often unproven) "expense" of joining - it is basically turning a row-heavy data table into a column-heavy table. They ran into their own limitation, as you imply, by creating new tables when they run out of columns.

I completely disagree with it.

Personally, I would stick with the old structure and re-evaluate the performance issues. That isn't to say the old way is the correct way, it is just marginally better than the "improvement" in my opinion, and removes the need to do large scale re-engineering of database tables and DAL code.

These tables strike me as largely static... caching would be an even better performance improvement without mutilating the database and one I would look at doing first. Do the "expensive" fetch once and stick it in memory somewhere, then forget about your troubles (note, I am making light of the need to manage the Cache, but static data is one of the easiest to manage).

Or, wait for the day you run into the maximum number of tables per database :-)

Others have suggested completely different stores. This is a perfectly viable possibility and if I didn't have an existing database structure I would be considering it too. That said, I see no reason why this structure can't fit into an RDBMS. I have seen it done on almost all large scale apps I have worked on. Interestingly enough, they all went down a similar route and all were mostly "successful" implementations.

share|improve this answer
2  
"wait for the day you run into the maximum number of tables per database"... but then you can just create a new database ;-) +1 for looking at overall architecture and wish I could give another +1 for cascading cost of re-engineering DAL, unit tests, ... –  Eric J. May 3 '12 at 18:02

No, it's not. It's terrible.

until the max number of column (handled by application) is reached, then a new table is created.

This sentence says it all. Under no circumstance should an application dynamically create tables. The "old" approach isn't ideal either, but since you have the requirement to let users add custom properties, it has to be like this.

Consider this:

  • You lose all type-safety as you have to store all values in the column "PROPERTY_VALUE"
  • Depending on your users, you could have them change the schema beforehand and then let them run some kind of database update batch job, so at least all the properties would be declared in the right datatype. Also, you could lose the entity_id/key thing.
  • Check out this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inner-platform_effect. This certainly reeks of it
  • Maybe a RDBMS isn't the right thing for your app. Consider using a key/value based store like MongoDB or another NoSQL database. (http://nosql-database.org/)
share|improve this answer
    
Interestingly in the case of MS-SQL, it knows the type inside an "untyped" field so when you read against the table from code, you are given good types anyway. So you don't necessarily lose all safety, from the code perspective at least. –  Adam Houldsworth May 3 '12 at 8:31
1  
+1 for suggesting a more appropriate store for this kind of data. SQL isn't the be-all, end-all of data storage (neither is NoSQL... each has a set of strengths and weaknesses). However, consider cost to change DAL vs. performance benefit for an existing app. –  Eric J. May 3 '12 at 18:03


From what I know of databases (but I'm certainly not the most experienced), it seems quite a bad idea to do that in your database. If you already know how many max custom properties a user might have, I'd say you'd better set the table number of columns to that value.

Then again, I'm not an expert, but making new columns on the fly isn't the kind of operations databases like. It's gonna bring you more trouble than anything.

If I were you, I'd either fix the number of custom properties, or stick with the old system.

share|improve this answer
    
experienced, not experimented (spanish speaker? :o) –  andrew cooke May 3 '12 at 8:24
    
French ^^ close in that case hehehe –  Gabriel Theron May 3 '12 at 11:25

I believe creating a new table for each entity to store properties is a bad design as you could end up bulking the database with tables. The only pro to applying the second method would be that you are not traversing through all of the redundant rows that do not apply to the Entity selected. However using indexes on your database on the original ENTITY_PROPERTIES table could help greatly with performance.

I would personally stick with your initial design, apply indexes and let the database engine determine the best methods for selecting the data rather than separating each entity property into a new table.

share|improve this answer

There is no "correct" way to design a database - I'm not aware of a universally recognized set of standards other than the famous "normal form" theory; many database designs ignore this standard for performance reasons.

There are ways of evaluating database designs though - performance, maintainability, intelligibility, etc. Quite often, you have to trade these against each other; that's what your change seems to be doing - trading maintainability and intelligibility against performance.

So, the best way to find out if that was a good trade off is to see if the performance gains have materialized. The best way to find that out is to create the proposed schema, load it with a representative dataset, and write queries you will need to run in production.

I'm guessing that the new design will not be perceivably faster for queries like "find STANDARD_PROPERTY_1 from entity where STANDARD_PROPERTY_1 = 'banana'.

I'm guessing it will not be perceivably faster when retrieving all properties for a given entity; in fact it might be slightly slower, because instead of a single join to ENTITY_PROPERTIES, the new design requires joins to several tables. You will be returning "sparse" results - presumably, not all entities will have values in the property_n columns in all ENTITY_PROPERTIES_n tables.

Where the new design may be significantly faster is when you need a compound where clause on custom properties. For instance, finding an entity where custom property 1 is true, custom property 2 is banana, and custom property 3 is not in ('kylie', 'pussycat dolls', 'giraffe') is e`(probably) faster when you can specify columns in the ENTITY_PROPERTIES_n tables instead of rows in the ENTITY_PROPERTIES table. Probably.

As for maintainability - yuck. Your database access code now needs to be far smarter, knowing which table holds which property, and how many columns are too many. The likelihood of entertaining bugs is high - there are more moving parts, and I can't think of any obvious unit tests to make sure that the database access logic is working.

Intelligibility is another concern - this solution is not in most developers' toolbox, it's not an industry-standard pattern. The old solution is pretty widely known - commonly referred to as "entity-attribute-value". This becomes a major issue on long-lived projects where you can't guarantee that the original development team will hang around.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.