Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using C++ (Qt).

I am extending a singleton class and a subclass has only static methods. I am not creating any instance of the SubClass. Singleton class has constructor and destructor are private, So I can not access its constructor and destructor.

 class Singleton 
 { 
   private :
           Singleton();
           ~Singleton();
   public :
      // some methods.
 }

 class SubClass : public Singleton
 {
   // There is NO constructor or destructor
   public:
   // Only some STATIC methods.
 }

I use the SubClass::getInstance() which calls getInstance() of parent. I use only static methods of SubClass (so no need to instantiate the SubClass).

So my problem is, I am getting warning on compile -

"SubClass:destructor could not be generated because a base class destructor is inaccessible".

I want to get rid of these warnings and Also wanted to know that is this design violating singleton design pattern?


What I want to Achieve?

I am creating a logger for an application. I am using a logger class of third party library (QxtLogger of QxtCore library). This QxtLogger class is a singleton and has constructor and destructor private. I want a singleton class with all the methods that QxtLogger has and some additional static methods (which are specific to my application).

So I created a class which inherits the QxtLogger and added some static methods to it. What worries me is extending the singleton class which is generating the warnings (because base class constructor and destructor are not accessible). So what should I do?

share|improve this question
    
virtual ~Singleton(); –  Feo May 3 '12 at 8:28
1  
should the dtor of base class protected? as in 'protected: virtual ~Singleton();' –  rt2800 May 3 '12 at 8:30
2  
Why do you want to subclass the singleton when you are only adding static methods to the subclass? Your question apart, this scenario doesnt seem to make much sense. You do realize that the methods can be called using the sub-class directly without the need for an instance right? –  Raam May 3 '12 at 8:33
    
@Raam I want the class which should have all the functions that the singleton have And some additional static methods. So I extended the singleton class. This can be achieved by writing a wrapper class over it. Which will end in writing lot of wrapper methods. And not supposed to be good idea. –  Anwar Shaikh May 3 '12 at 8:38
    
@Anwar You may want to rephrase the question and add your limitations as well. As Luchian points out, your best bet is to use composition. –  Raam May 3 '12 at 8:47

2 Answers 2

You can't extend the class that has no visible constructors. And that was the intent of the class designer.

If they wanted the class to be extended, they'd have made the constructor/destructor protected.

I suggest you use composition instead of inheritance.

share|improve this answer
    
I want the class which should have all the functions that the singleton have And some additional static methods. So I extended the singleton class. This can be achieved by writing a wrapper class over it. Which will end in writing lot of wrapper methods. And not supposed to be good idea. Bottom line Code is working fine, but gives some warning. –  Anwar Shaikh May 3 '12 at 10:16
    
do you see any better approach to solve this problem? –  Anwar Shaikh May 3 '12 at 13:35
    
@AnwarShaikh I already said you should use composition, even if that implies having wrapper methods. To me this sounds like the only correct solution, esp considering the constructor/destructor is marked as private - clear intent for the class not to be extended. –  Luchian Grigore May 3 '12 at 13:40
    
@AnwarShaikh or one other way is to not wrap the class at all, and just have some functions that operate on it. –  Luchian Grigore May 3 '12 at 13:41
    
@Griogre Class I am extending is a singleton, and all singletons have constructor and destructor private. Is that mean they are not supposed to extended? –  Anwar Shaikh May 4 '12 at 6:42

STOP!

Besides the dubious use (once again) of the Singleton anti-pattern, you should remember that C++ is not Java.

As a consequence, there are better ways that inheritance to extend the functionalities of a class: free-functions!

void extend1(Singleton& s, ...);

int extend2(Singleton const& s);

Note that those functions take a Singleton class by reference for 2 reasons:

  • it becomes explicit that they depend on it
  • it paves the road toward a refactoring, for when you'll get rid of the Singletonness
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.