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A common pattern in my code is: "search through a list until I find a particular element, then look at the elements that come before and after it."

As an example, I might want to look through a log file where important events are marked with asterisks, and then pull out the context of the important event.

In the following example, I want to know why the hyperdrive exploded:

  Spinning up the hyperdrive
  Hyperdrive speed 100 rpm
  Hyperdrive speed 200 rpm
  Hyperdrive lubricant levels low (100 gal.)
* CRITICAL EXISTENCE FAILURE
  Hyperdrive exploded

I want a function, get_item_with_context(), that allows me to find the first line with an asterisk, and then gives me up to n lines preceding it, and m lines following it.

My attempt is below:

import collections, itertools
def get_item_with_context(predicate, iterable, items_before = 0, items_after = 0):
    # Searches through the list of `items` until an item matching `predicate` is found.
    # Then return that item.
    # If no item matching predicate is found, return None.
    # Optionally, also return up to `items_before` items preceding the target, and
    # `items after` items after the target.
    #
    # Note:
    d = collections.deque (maxlen = items_before + 1 + items_after)
    iter1 = iterable.__iter__()
    iter2 = itertools.takewhile(lambda x: not(predicate(x)), iter1)    
    d.extend(iter2)

    # zero-length input, or no matching item
    if len(d) == 0 or not(predicate(d[-1])):
        return None

    # get context after match:
    try:
        for i in xrange(items_after):
            d.append(iter1.next())
    except StopIteration:
        pass

    if ( items_before == 0 and items_after == 0):
        return d[0]
    else:
        return list(d)

Usage should be like:

>>> get_item_with_context(lambda x: x == 3, [1,2,3,4,5,6],
                          items_before = 1, items_after = 1)
[2, 3, 4]

Problems with this:

  • Checking to make sure we actually found a match, using not(predicate(d[-1])), doesn't work for some reason. It always returns false.
  • If there are less than items_after items in the list after the matching item is found, then the results are rubbish.
  • Other edge cases?

Can I please have some advice on how to make this work / make it more robust? Or, if I'm reinventing the wheel, feel free to tell me that too.

share|improve this question
    
Is this something you cannot accomplish with slicing? –  Burhan Khalid May 3 '12 at 9:25
    
@BurhanKhalid: I may be using iterables which can't be rewound. –  Li-aung Yip May 3 '12 at 9:28
    
why do you use iterable.__iter__() instead of iter(iterable)? –  jamylak May 3 '12 at 9:45
1  
@jamylak: because I'm silly. ;) –  Li-aung Yip May 3 '12 at 9:51
1  
I do not understand your result. Shouldn't it be [2, 3, 4]? Also I was wondering if something that can easily be done through tools like grep, is there a reason for choosing Python (except your sarcastic answer I'm silly :-) ) –  Abhijit May 3 '12 at 10:09

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This appears to handle edge cases correctly:

from collections import deque

def item_with_context(predicate, seq, before=0, after=0):
    q = deque(maxlen=before)
    it = iter(seq)

    for s in it:
        if predicate(s):
            return list(q) + [s] + [x for _,x in zip(range(after), it)]
        q.append(s)
share|improve this answer
    
We have a winner! Concise and passes all my test cases. Thank you. :) (Using the "terminates on shortest sequence" behaviour of zip() to limit the number of elements taken - that's a nice touch.) –  Li-aung Yip May 4 '12 at 1:11
    
There was a subtle bug - one too many items are consumed from it, because zip(it, range(after)) takes an element of it before it checks if there's anything in range(after). If you swap the order of the arguments it works fine. I've corrected your code. –  Li-aung Yip May 4 '12 at 3:12
    
@Li-aungYip: can you provide a testcase showing the bug? I'm not sure I understand. –  georg May 4 '12 at 6:46
    
Sure. Try something like a = xrange(10); item_with_context(lambda x: x==3, a, 0, 0); a.next(). You expect the function to consume the iterator up to 3 and then stop, so that a.next() is 4. But with your original code you actually get 5. –  Li-aung Yip May 4 '12 at 10:46

You may get the ring buffer for the context using a collections.deque object. To get +/- 2 lines of context, Initialize it like this:

context = collections.deque(maxlen=5)

Then iterate over whatever you like, call this for every line:

context.append(line)

Match on context[2], and output the whole deque content for every match.

share|improve this answer
    
This is actually what my sample code tries to do, and it works well assuming the element you're looking for actually exists, and there are appropriate numbers of elements before and after it. But there are lots of edge cases. –  Li-aung Yip May 3 '12 at 10:01

This is probably a completely "unpythonic" solution:

import itertools

def get_item_with_context(predicate, iterable, items_before = 0, items_after = 0):
    found_index = -1
    found_element = None

    before = [None] * items_before # Circular buffer

    after = []
    after_index = 0

    for element, index in zip(iterable, itertools.count()):
        if found_index >= 0:
            after += [element]
            if len(after) >= items_after:
                break
        elif predicate(element):
            found_index = index
            found_element = element
            if not items_after:
                break
        else:
            if items_before > 0:
                before[after_index] = element
                after_index = (after_index + 1) % items_before

    if found_index >= 0:
        if after_index:
            # rotate the circular before-buffer into place
            before = before[after_index:] + before[0:after_index]
        if found_index - items_before < 0:
            # slice off elements that "fell off" the start
            before = before[items_before - found_index:]
        return before, found_element, after

    return None

for index in range(0, 8):
    x = get_item_with_context(lambda x: x == index, [1,2,3,4,5,6], items_before = 1, items_after = 2)
    print(index, x)

Output:

0 None
1 ([], 1, [2, 3])
2 ([1], 2, [3, 4])
3 ([2], 3, [4, 5])
4 ([3], 4, [5, 6])
5 ([4], 5, [6])
6 ([5], 6, [])
7 None

I took the liberty of changing the output to make it clearer what matched the predicate and what came before and after:

([2], 3, [4, 5])
  ^   ^    ^
  |   |    +-- after the element
  |   +------- the element that matched the predicate
  +----------- before the element

The function handles:

  • Item not found, returns None (last line of function if you want to return something else)
  • Before-elements not completely fulfilled (ie. found element was too close to the start to really get N elements before it)
  • After-elements not completely fulfilled (same for too close to the end)
  • items_before or items_after is set to 0 (no context in that direction)

It uses:

  • A simple circular buffer for the before-elements, which is rotated into place to get elements in the correct order
  • A simple list for the before-elements
  • Any iterable, no need for indexable collections, does not enumerate any element more than once, and will stop after finding the required context
share|improve this answer
    
You can persuade a python deque to act as a circular buffer (by initialising it with a max_length argument.) That might taste a bit better than rolling your own circular buffer. ;) –  Li-aung Yip May 3 '12 at 9:57
from itertools import takewhile, tee, chain
from collections import deque

def contextGet(iterable, predicate, before, after):
    iter1, iter2 = tee(iterable)

    beforeLog = deque(maxlen = before)
    for item in takewhile(lambda x: not(predicate(x)), iter1):
        beforeLog.append(item)
        iter2.next()

    afterLog = []
    for i in xrange(after + 1):
        try:
            afterLog.append(iter2.next())
        except StopIteration:
            break

    return chain(beforeLog, afterLog)

Alternatively:

def contextGet(iterable, predicate, before, after):
    it1, it2 = tee(it)
    log = deque(maxlen = (before + after + 1))
    for i in chain(dropwhile(lambda x: not predicate(x), it1), xrange(after + 1)):
        try:
            log.append(it2.next())
        except StopIteration:
            break
    return log

This second one may return too many "before" elements if the remainder of the list is shorter than the after parameter.

share|improve this answer

I am not sure if I am missing something in the problem, but this can be simply done as

>>> def get_item_with_context(predicate, iterable, items_before = 0, items_after = 0):
    queue = collections.deque(maxlen=items_before+1)
    found = False
    for e in iterable:
        queue.append(e)
        if not found and predicate(e):
            queue = collections.deque(queue,items_before+1+items_after)
            found = True
        if found:
            if not items_after : break
            items_after-=1
    if not found:
        queue.clear()
    return list(queue)

>>> get_item_with_context(lambda x: x == 0, [1,2,3,4,5,6],items_before = 2, items_after = 1)
[]
>>> get_item_with_context(lambda x: x == 4, [1,2,3,4,5,6],items_before = 2, items_after = 1)
[2, 3, 4, 5]
>>> get_item_with_context(lambda x: x == 1, [1,2,3,4,5,6],items_before = 2, items_after = 1)
[1, 2]
>>> get_item_with_context(lambda x: x == 6, [1,2,3,4,5,6],items_before = 2, items_after = 1)
[4, 5, 6]
>>> get_item_with_context(lambda x: x == 4, [1,2,3,4,5,6],items_before = 20, items_after = 10)
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]
share|improve this answer
import collections

def context_match(predicate, iterable, before = 0, after = 0):
    pre = collections.deque(maxlen = before + 1)
    post = []
    match = 0
    for el in iterable:
        if not match:
            pre.append(el)
            if predicate(el):
                match = 1
        elif match:
            if len(post) == after:
                break
            post.append(el)
    if not match:
        return
    output = list(pre)
    output.extend(post)
    return output

for val in xrange(8):
    print context_match(lambda x: x == val, [1,2,3,4,5,6],before = 2, after = 2)
#Output:
None
[1, 2, 3]
[1, 2, 3, 4]
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
[2, 3, 4, 5, 6]
[3, 4, 5, 6]
[4, 5, 6]
None
share|improve this answer

Here is something shorter:

import collections
from itertools import islice

def windowfilter(pred, it, before=0, after=0):
        size = before + 1 + after
        q = collections.deque(maxlen=size)
        it = iter(it)
        for x in it:
                q.append(x)
                if pred(x):
                        # ok we got the item, add the trailing lines
                        more = list(islice(it, after))
                        q.extend(more)

                        # maybe there were too few items left
                        got = before + 1 + len(more)

                        # slice from the end
                        return tuple(q)[-got:]

Tests yield:

seq = [1,2,3,4,5,6]
for elem in range(8):
        print elem, windowfilter((lambda x:x==elem), seq, 2, 1)

# Output:
0 None
1 (1, 2)
2 (1, 2, 3)
3 (1, 2, 3, 4)
4 (2, 3, 4, 5)
5 (3, 4, 5, 6)
6 (4, 5, 6)
7 None
share|improve this answer

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