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I have a working per fragment lighting but I wonder what can I do to keep a lighting calculation in the modelspace where I don't have to multiply normals by normalModelMatrix as below in the fragment shader.

Shaders: ViewMatrix - camera transformation, ModelMatrix - objects transfomation. Light position - glm::vec4 lightPos(3.0f, 2.0f, -30.0f, 1.0f)

Render loop:

glUseProgram(ProgramId);
glUniformMatrix4fv(ViewMatrixUniformLocation, 1, GL_FALSE, glm::value_ptr(ViewMatrix));
glUniform4f(lightIntensityUniformLocation, 0.8f, 0.8f, 0.8f, 1.0f);
glUniform4f(ambientIntensityUniformLocation, 0.2f, 0.2f, 0.2f, 0.2f);
glUniform3fv(dirToLightUniformLocation, 1, glm::value_ptr( lightPos));

ModelMatrixStack.push(ModelMatrix);
ModelMatrix = glm::translate(ModelMatrix, glm::vec3(0, 0, -30));
ModelMatrix = glm::rotate(ModelMatrix, 75.0f, glm::vec3(0,0,1)); 
normMatrix = glm::mat3(ModelMatrix);
glUniformMatrix4fv(ModelMatrixUniformLocation, 1, GL_FALSE,           
glm::value_ptr(ModelMatrix));   
glUniformMatrix3fv(normalModelMatrixUniformLocation, 1, GL_FALSE, 
glm::value_ptr(normMatrix));
drawTeapot();

ModelMatrix = ModelMatrixStack.top();
normMatrix = glm::mat3(ModelMatrix);

glUniformMatrix4fv(ModelMatrixUniformLocation, 1, GL_FALSE,  
glm::value_ptr(ModelMatrix));
glUniformMatrix3fv(normalModelMatrixUniformLocation, 1, GL_FALSE,  
glm::value_ptr(normMatrix));
myground.draw();

glUseProgram(0);

Vertex shader:

#version 400

layout(location=0) in vec4 in_position;
layout(location=1) in vec3 in_normal;
out vec3 normal;
out vec4 position;

uniform mat4 ModelMatrix;
uniform mat4 ViewMatrix;
uniform mat4 ProjectionMatrix;

void main(void)
{
     vec4 vertexPosition = ModelMatrix * in_position;
     gl_Position = ProjectionMatrix * ViewMatrix * vertexPosition;
     normal = in_normal;
     position = vertexPosition;
}

Fragment shader:

version 400

in vec3 normal;
in vec4 position;
out vec4 outputColor;

uniform vec3 lightPos;
uniform vec4 lightIntensity;
uniform vec4 ambientIntensity;
uniform mat3 normalModelMatrix;

void main(void)
{
     vec3 normCamSpace = normalize(normalModelMatrix * normalize(normal));
     vec3 dirToLight = normalize(lightPos - vec3(position));
     float cosAngIncidence = dot(normCamSpace, dirToLight);
     cosAngIncidence = clamp(cosAngIncidence, 0, 1);
     outputColor = (lightIntensity * cosAngIncidence) + ambientIntensity;
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The computational cost for doing illumination in model space is actually higher, than doing it in eye space, as you've to transform the light position and directions for individually each model. Those usually happen on the CPU side. Yet you still have to perform a transformation of the normals then.

modelspace where I don't have to multiply normals by normalModelMatrix as below in the fragment shader.

That calculation works as well in the vertex shader. Just move it there.


Update/EDIT

for clarification here the modified shader code:

Vertex shader:

#version 400

layout(location=0) in vec4 in_position;
layout(location=1) in vec3 in_normal;

out vec3 eyespaceNormal;
out vec4 eyespacePosition;

uniform mat4 ModelviewMatrix;
uniform mat3 NormalMatrix; // == inverse(transpose(ModelviewMatrix))
uniform mat4 ProjectionMatrixq;

void main(void)
{
     eyespacePosition = ModelviewMatrix * in_position;
     eyespaceNormal = normalize(NormalMatrix * in_normal);
     gl_Position = ProjectionMatrix * eyespacePosition;
}

Fragment shader:

#version 400

in vec3 eyespaceNormal;
in vec4 eyespacePosition;
out vec4 outputColor;

uniform vec3 lightPos;
uniform vec4 lightIntensity;
uniform vec4 ambientIntensity;

void main(void)
{
     vec3 dirToLight = normalize(lightPos - vec3(eyespacePosition));
     float cosAngIncidence = dot(eyespaceNormal, dirToLight);
     cosAngIncidence = clamp(cosAngIncidence, 0, 1);
     outputColor = (lightIntensity * cosAngIncidence) + ambientIntensity;
}

BTW: You normal transformation matrix was wrong. You must use the inverse of the transposed modelview matrix for this.

share|improve this answer
    
If I right understood you in my case doing illumination in model space might looks like this: in vertex shader I can send to fragment shader in_postion without a multiplication by ModelMatrix (position = in_position) Then in the render loop after last ModelMatrix transformation I need to calculate inverse of a ModelMatrix and multiply it by lightPos: glm::mat4 invTransform = glm::inverse(ModelMatrix); glUniform3fv(dirToLightUniformLocation, 1, glm::value_ptr( invTransform * lightPos)); Finally I don't have to multiply normals by normalModelMatrix in my shader. –  Irbis May 3 '12 at 11:16
    
@Irbis: No, that's not what I meant. I told you to put all the transformations into the vertex shader. Only pass the readily transformed vectors to the fragment shader. –  datenwolf May 3 '12 at 13:35
    
But as long as I don't use non-uniform scale my normal transformation matrix seems to be sufficient. I use ViewMatrix to handle my fps camera so there should be eyespacePostion = ModelMatrix * in_position, because I want keep the light at fixed position. Moreover I think that eyespaceNormal should be normalize in fragment shader. What do you think about a concept mentioned above where I don't have to use normal transformation matrix ? –  Irbis May 3 '12 at 14:19
    
normalizing the transformed normal in the fragment shader makes sense if the variation of the normal over the face is large. Technically the correct method was not a barycentric interpolation with normalization, but a spherical interpolation anyway. You should transform the lights into eyespace on the CPU to save computational resources of the GPU (you'll have hardly more than 20 light sources illuminating a face). Computing this one on the CPU is much more efficient, than computing it for every vertex again, and again. –  datenwolf May 3 '12 at 15:35
    
Remember: CPUs are not slower than GPU, they're just not as parallel. If a task doesn't gain from parallelization (transforming only a handfull of light positions, for example) to it on the CPU. –  datenwolf May 3 '12 at 15:36

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