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I have a sub named "lookup" which does a lookup in a hash for a given value. I realized it would be much more powerful if I can ask it to look not for a given value, but a value smaller than the one passed as a parameter.

I could make lookupbigger, lookupsmall.. etc, but I am sure there is a better way.

# lookup id according to the search criteria
sub lookup {
  my( $data, $lk, $lv ) = ( @_ );
  my @res;

  foreach my $key (keys $data) {
    my $value = $$data{$key};
    next unless( defined $$value{$lk} );
    # this is the line where I want to replace eq with another operator
    push(@res, $key) if( $$value{$lk} eq $lv );
  }

  return \@res;
}
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1  
What have you tried? Post some sample code. –  TLP May 3 '12 at 10:39
    
@TLP I updated the question with the actual code. –  cstamas May 3 '12 at 11:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can pass a criterion function to your lookup function:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict; use warnings;
use YAML;

my %hash = qw(a 1 b 2 c 3 d 4 e 5);

# find all keys with odd values

print Dump lookup_keys_by_value(\%hash, sub {
        return unless @_;
        my $v = shift;
        return $v % 2;
    },
);

sub lookup_keys_by_value {
    my ($hash, $criterion) = @_;

    my @keys;

    while (my ($k, $v) = each %$hash) {
        push @keys, $k if $criterion->($v);
    }

    return \@keys;
}
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1  
To make this more versatile you could create a sub for each of the comparissons operators (like eq, ==, > and so on) and pass a code ref depending on which one you want. –  simbabque May 3 '12 at 11:35
    
Thanks, I like this. –  cstamas May 3 '12 at 13:46

Here's an idea (perhaps too "clever"):

use strict;
use warnings;

{   no strict 'refs';
    # When called like __PACKAGE__->$op( ... ),  __PACKAGE__ is $_[0]
    *{'>'}  = sub { return $_[1] > $_[2]; }; 
    *{'<'}  = sub { return $_[1] < $_[2]; };
    *{'=='} = sub { return $_[1] == $_[2]; };
}

sub determine {
    my ( $first_arg, $op, $second_arg ) 
        = map { s/^\s+//; s/\s+$//; $_ }
          split( /\s*([<>]|==)\s*/, @_ == 1 ? shift : "@_" )
        ;
    say "$first_arg $op $second_arg => " 
      . (  __PACKAGE__->$op( $first_arg, $second_arg ) ? 'TRUE' : 'FALSE' )
      ;
}

determine( qw( 1 < 2 ) );
determine( qw( 2 < 1 ) );
determine( qw( 1 > 2 ) );
determine( qw( 2 > 1 ) );
determine( qw( 1 == 2 ) );
determine( qw( 1 == 1 ) );
determine( qw( 2 == 2 ) );
determine( ' 1 < 2 ' );
determine( ' 2 < 1 ' );
determine( ' 1 > 2 ' );
determine( ' 2 > 1 ' );
determine( ' 1 == 2 ' );
determine( ' 1 == 1 ' );
determine( ' 2 == 2 ' );
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It is clever, but it really might be too clever. –  Sinan Ünür May 3 '12 at 13:43
1  
@SinanÜnür, that's why the warning is there. In reality there's no advantage of this over subs in a hash, but it just feels more like "passing an operator", when it's in the symbol table. :) –  Axeman May 3 '12 at 13:55

You could try to use overload

use overload (
'>' => 'compareBigger',
'<' => 'compareSmaller',
'==' => 'equals'
 )
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