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#include <QQueue>
#include <QString>

class   Util {
public:

    static QQueue<QString> links;

    Util() {
    }
};

    Util::links.enqueue("hello world");

How can I do that?

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1  
perhaps qt-project.org/doc/qt-4.8/qlist.html#QList-3 could be useful –  Shahbaz May 3 '12 at 10:53

4 Answers 4

You could initialise it with the result of a function:

QQueue<QString> make_links() {
    QQueue<QString> queue;
    queue.enqueue("hello world");
    return queue;
}

QQueue<QString> Util::links = make_links();

I'm not familiar with QT, but one might hope that they are adding support for C++11 initialiser lists, in which case you'd be able to initialise it as:

QQueue<QString> Util::links {"hello world"};

(UPDATE: according to the link in Shahbaz's comment, you can indeed do that if you are using C++11).

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Try using a static member function:

#include <QQueue>
#include <QString>

class   Util {
public:

    static QQueue<QString>& links() {
      static QQueue<QString> instance;
      static bool is_init = false;
      if(!is_init) {
        instance.enqueue("hello world");
        is_init = true;
      }
      return instance;
    }

    Util() {
    }
};

In C++11 QQueue seems to support initializer lists, as Shahbaz has said:

QQueue<QString> Util::links = {"hello world"};
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In a multi-threaded program, you'll need to make sure you initialise it before allowing multiple threads to access it. You don't have that problem with a static object. –  Mike Seymour May 3 '12 at 10:59
    
@MikeSeymour Yeah, a static member function isn't that good of a solution for this. –  Pubby May 3 '12 at 11:03

You can use static initializer object for all such cases:

header file:

#include <QQueue>
#include <QString>

class   Util {
public:

    static QQueue<QString> links;

    Util() {
    }
};

cpp file:

namespace {
    struct StaticInitializer {
        StaticInitializer() {
            Util::links.enqueue("hello world");
        }
    } initializer;
}
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You initialize as usual, in the global scope:

QQueue<QString> Util::links;

or

QQueue<QString> Util::links(1); // with constructor parameters if necessary
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Except "hello world" is not there! Also, QQueue doesn't have that constructor –  Shahbaz May 3 '12 at 10:51

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