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I'm currently reading in a text file containing the following lines:

0 24000 97200
1 52200 95400
2 0 0
3 37800 180000
4 0 0
5 48000 95400
6 0 0

The first value represents the day (0 = sunday, 1 = monday, ...) The numeric values, e.g. 24000, represent the total amount of seconds.

Eventually I would like to get something like this:

Graphical Representation of Weekly Schedule

This is the code so far:

open(SCHEDULE, $schedule) or die print "Failed to open $schedule";
@lines = <SCHEDULE>;
@secondsfrom  = (0,0,0,0,0,0,0);
@secondsto    = (0,0,0,0,0,0,0);
@secondsextra = (0,0,0,0,0,0,0);
@days = ("sunday","monday","tuesday","wedsneday","thursday","friday","saturday");
foreach (@lines) {
    ($day, $fromtotalseconds, $tototalseconds) = split(/ /,$_,3);
    @secondsfrom[$day] += $fromtotalseconds;
    @secondsto[$day]   += $tototalseconds;
}
for (my $i=0; $i<=6;$i++) {
    print "\n@days[$i]  @secondsfrom[$i] to @secondsto[$i]";
}

At this moment I'm stuck! I've been searching for days on how to convert these values to something similar like:

Sunday from 24000 to 86400 (MAX) 
Tuesday from 0 to 48000 and from 52200 to 86400
…

This is what it produces for me:

Sunday 24000 to        97200
Tuesday 52200 to        95400
…
share|improve this question
    
best practice: use qw(first second) instead ("first", "second") and for instead foreach –  gaussblurinc May 3 '12 at 11:09
    
understand, you need hash of arrays –  gaussblurinc May 3 '12 at 11:20
    
if right value (95400) greater than (86400), what it must do with? –  gaussblurinc May 3 '12 at 11:25
    
It needs to add a block on the next day stating from 0 to 48000 and from 52200 to 86400. Take a look at the img i provided. This shows what the first lines should become. –  Simon Says May 3 '12 at 11:54
    
Thanks for accepting my answer. I posted a version which generates HTML output on my blog. –  Sinan Ünür May 3 '12 at 15:39
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here is a textual implementation. I did not really check it for correctness, so there might be bugs lurking in it, but it should illustrate how to deal with the input one line at a time:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict; use warnings;

use constant ONE_MINUTE => 60;
use constant ONE_HOUR   => 60 * ONE_MINUTE;
use constant ONE_DAY    => 24 * ONE_HOUR;
use constant BLOCK_SIZE => ONE_MINUTE * 20;
use constant DAY_LENGTH => ONE_DAY/BLOCK_SIZE;

my @days = qw(Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat);

my $remainder = 0;

while (my $line = <DATA>) {
    next unless $line =~ m{
        \A
        ( [0-6]  ) \s+
        ( [0-9]+ ) \s+
        ( [0-9]+ ) \s+
        \z
    }x;
    my ($daynum, $start, $duration) = ($1, $2, $3);
    my $start_block = seconds_to_blocks($start);
    my $duration_block = seconds_to_blocks($duration);

    my ($dayrow, $hang) = make_dayrow(
        $remainder,
        $start_block,
        $duration_block,
    );

    printf "%3s: %s\n", $days[$daynum], $dayrow;
    $remainder = $hang;
}

sub seconds_to_blocks {
    my ($seconds) = @_;
    return int($seconds / BLOCK_SIZE);
}

sub make_dayrow {
    my ($remainder, $start, $duration) = @_;

    if ($remainder > DAY_LENGTH) {
        my $hang = $remainder - DAY_LENGTH;
        return ('#' x DAY_LENGTH, $hang);
    }

    my $hang = $start + $duration > DAY_LENGTH
             ? $duration - (DAY_LENGTH - $start)
             : 0
             ;

    my $dayrow = '#' x $remainder;
    $dayrow   .= ' ' x ($start - $remainder);
    $dayrow   .= '#' x ($duration - $hang);
    $dayrow   .= ' ' x (DAY_LENGTH - length $dayrow);

    return ($dayrow, $hang);
}


__DATA__
0 24000 97200
1 52200 95400
2 0 0
3 37800 180000
4 0 0
5 48000 95400
6 0 0

Output:

Sun:                     ####################################################
Mon: #############################              #############################
Tue: ##################################################
Wed:                                #########################################
Thu: ########################################################################
Fri: #####################################   ################################
Sat: ###############################################

Update

If you just want percentages, that is also straightforward:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict; use warnings;
use YAML;

use constant ONE_MINUTE => 60;
use constant ONE_HOUR   => 60 * ONE_MINUTE;
use constant ONE_DAY    => 24 * ONE_HOUR;

my @days = qw(Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat);

my $remainder = 0;
my @rows;

while (my $line = <DATA>) {
    next unless $line =~ m{
        \A
        ( [0-6]  ) \s+
        ( [0-9]+ ) \s+
        ( [0-9]+ ) \s+
        \z
    }x;
    my ($daynum, $start, $duration) = ($1, $2, $3);

    my $dayrow = make_dayrow($remainder, $start, $duration);

    push @rows, $dayrow->[0];
    $remainder = $dayrow->[1];
}

for my $row (@rows) {
    print join("\t", map sprintf('%.0f%%', $_ * 100), @$row), "\n";
}

sub make_dayrow {
    my ($remainder, $start, $duration) = @_;

    return [[1, 0, 0], $remainder - ONE_DAY] if $remainder > ONE_DAY;

    my $hang = $start + $duration > ONE_DAY
             ? $duration - (ONE_DAY - $start)
             : 0
             ;

    return [
        [
            $remainder / ONE_DAY,
            $start / ONE_DAY,
            ($duration - $hang) / ONE_DAY
        ],
        $hang
    ];
}


__DATA__
0 24000 97200
1 52200 95400
2 0 0
3 37800 180000
4 0 0
5 48000 95400
6 0 0

Output:

0%      28%     72%
40%     60%     40%
71%     0%      0%
0%      44%     56%
100%    0%      0%
52%     56%     44%
66%     0%      0%
share|improve this answer
    
Wow! you surely look like you have the hang of it. However I'm interested in the values it would produce. Not on how i would show it. I want to show it using HTML but therefore i need the values. As soon as I have the values from Monday: 0 to 54400 and from 56400 to 86400 I can produce my html output. –  Simon Says May 3 '12 at 12:03
    
As soon as i have the values I want to convert them to a percentage ex: 0 to 86400 is 0% to 100% and will draw me a full box. –  Simon Says May 3 '12 at 12:06
    
So just before I visualise it. My values would be Sunday: 24% 76% or Monday: 0% 40% 50% 100% –  Simon Says May 3 '12 at 12:09
    
Your calculation is wrong: 24_000/86_400 = 0.2778. –  Sinan Ünür May 3 '12 at 12:34
add comment
  open SH, "<", $schedule or die "Oh, $schedule die :\ \n";
      %hash = map{$_,0}(0..6); #not best but work, create a hash of days
      my $day;
      my $first;
      my $second;
  for(<SH>){
     ($day,$first,$second)=split(/ /,$_,3); #work? yeah
     $hash{$day}=$second-$first;
  }

  map{print "key is ".$_." value is ".$hash{$_}."\n";}sort keys %hash;
share|improve this answer
    
My print produces a similar thing, but when the seconds amount is higher then 86400 (eq 1 day); It should be added to the next line –  Simon Says May 3 '12 at 11:20
    
I've edited the question to make it more clear. –  Simon Says May 3 '12 at 11:23
2  
map { print...? Sounds like an awkward idea. Just use a post-script for loop. And you can interpolate variables in double quoted strings: print "key is $_ value is $hash{$_}\n" for sort keys %hash. –  TLP May 3 '12 at 11:25
    
Also, you can group declarations and assign to them within the loop: my ($day, $first, $second) = split .... This will also keep the variable scope limited to the block they are used. –  TLP May 3 '12 at 11:29
    
thanks! will improve my perl :) –  gaussblurinc May 3 '12 at 11:38
show 1 more comment

This is almost exactly what you're looking for:

use strict;
use warnings;

use constant MAX_DAY => 86_400;

my @week;
while ( <DATA> ) { 
    my ( $dow, $start, $end ) = split ' ';
    next unless $start + $end;
    while ( $end > 0 ) { 
        my $cont = $end > MAX_DAY;
        push @{ $week [ ( $dow++ ) % 7 ] }, [ $start, $cont ? MAX_DAY : $end, $cont ];
        $start  = 0;
        $end   -= MAX_DAY;
    }
}

my @dow_names = qw(Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat);
foreach my $day ( @week ) { 
    print shift( @dow_names ) . ': ';
    if ( ref $day ) { 
        print join( ' and '
                  , map { "from $_->[0] to $_->[1]" . ( $_->[2] and ' (MAX)' ) } @$day 
                  );
    }
    print "\n";
}
__DATA__ 
0 24000 97200
1 52200 95400
2 0 0
3 37800 180000
4 0 0
5 48000 95400
6 0 0
share|improve this answer
add comment

How about this change to your code?

use strict;
use warnings;
my @lines = (
'0 24000 97200',
'1 52200 95400',
'2 0 0',
'3 37800 180000',
'4 0 0',
'5 48000 95400',
'6 0 0',
);
my @days = qw(sunday monday tuesday wedsneday thursday friday saturday);
for (my $i=0; $i<=$#lines;$i++) {
    my ($day, $fromtotalseconds, $tototalseconds) = split(/ /,$lines[$i],3);
    next if ($fromtotalseconds == 0 && $tototalseconds == 0);
    if ($tototalseconds > 86400) {
      my $remainingSeconds = $tototalseconds - (86400 - $fromtotalseconds);
      $tototalseconds = 86400;
      splice @lines, $i+1, $#lines - $i, (sprintf('%d %d %d', $day + 1, 0, $remainingSeconds), @lines[$i+1 .. $#lines]);
    }
    print "\n$days[$day] from $fromtotalseconds to $tototalseconds";
}

I removed the arrays and put the print at the end of each loop iteration. I also switched from foreach to three-argument for because that way we can easily put more stuff into @lines. Every time we find that the to-value $tototalseconds is larger than one day we add a new line to @lines right after the current line. That way it will be used in the next iteration.

It doesn't say

Tuesday from 0 to 48000 and from 52200 to 86400

but it says

sunday from 24000 to 86400
monday from 0 to 10800
monday from 52200 to 86400
tuesday from 0 to 9000
wedsneday from 37800 to 86400
thursday from 0 to 86400
friday from 0 to 7200
friday from 48000 to 86400
saturday from 0 to 9000

what I find is not too bad. You'll be able to change that in the way you need your values.

By the way, always use strict and use warnings. There were a couple of things in your code that threw some warnings. For example, if the value of an array element in perl is a scalar, you have to put a $ in front of it, not an @: $secondsfrom[$day] += $fromtotalseconds.

Edit: Second example.

my @lines = (
'0 9600 91200',
'1 40800 186000', 
'2 0 0', 
'3 57000 87000',
'4 63600 173400', 
'5 0 0', 
'6 0 0',);

Produces:

sunday from 9600 to 86400
monday from 0 to 14400
monday from 40800 to 86400
tuesday from 0 to 86400
wedsneday from 0 to 54000
wedsneday from 57000 to 86400
thursday from 0 to 57600
thursday from 63600 to 86400
friday from 0 to 86400
saturday from 0 to 64200
share|improve this answer
    
Wow! Thx, this is the closest to what i wanted to achieve! –  Simon Says May 3 '12 at 12:24
    
mmmm can you try with this input: 0 9600 91200 1 40800 186000 2 0 0 3 57000 87000 4 63600 173400 5 0 0 6 0 0 –  Simon Says May 3 '12 at 13:38
    
there seems to be an error. It should be saturday from 0 to 85550-ish... –  Simon Says May 3 '12 at 18:19
    
@SimonSays: You are right. There was an error in the calculation of $remainingSeconds. I fixed that in the answer and added another example. Have a look at @lines at the end of the script btw. There might be a problem with sorting if two lines get added and the second one overlaps with an existing line. –  simbabque May 4 '12 at 8:42
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