Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise
class A
{
    private:
        A () {}

    public:
        static A* getInstance ()
        {
            return new A ();
        }
};

int main ()
{
    A.getInstance ();
    return 0;
}

results in the error stated in the title. I do realize that if I create a variable in class A and instanciate it there and return it directly, the error will vanish.

But, here I want to understand what is the meaning of this error and why can't I use it this way.

share|improve this question
up vote 12 down vote accepted

You need to call the method using the scope resolution operator - :::

 A::getInstance ();

Also, if this is meant to be a singleton, it's a very bad one. Whenever you call getInstance(), you'll receive a new object, and you'll run into memory leaks if you forget to delete any instances.

A singleton is usually implemented like so:

class A
{
    private:
        A () {}
        static A* instance;
    public:
        static A* getInstance ()
        {
            if ( !instance )
                instance = new A ();
            return instance;
        }
};

//implementation file
A* A::instance = NULL;
share|improve this answer
    
yes, yes, of course, this was still test code. am still trying to understand the singleton. thanks. – TheIndependentAquarius May 3 '12 at 11:14
1  
You can simplify your singleton implementation by using a static local variable in getInstance instead of a static class member. – Luc Touraille May 3 '12 at 12:02
    
don't we have a memory leak here? How it will be destructed? – Vitaly Dyatlov Dec 19 '14 at 15:11
1  
@VitalyDyatlov a memory leak refers more to something that leaks continuously, or that can't be freed in the future. You can always clear the memory by calling delete A::instance somewhere. – Luchian Grigore Dec 22 '14 at 22:18

Use scope resolution operator :: (not . like in Java for example):

A::getInstance();
share|improve this answer
    
@AnishaKaul: It is called the scope resolution operator in C++. hmjd: Can you edit the Java bit out -- this may be confusing for newbies. – dirkgently May 3 '12 at 11:16
    
@dirkgently, done. – hmjd May 3 '12 at 11:28
    
@hmjd and now since you have removed that java information, your answer is no different from others. I thought this to be a syntax error, had copied this from a book - didn't know that it was Java's syntax. you shouldn't have removed it. – TheIndependentAquarius May 3 '12 at 11:36
    
@AnishaKaul, this is a C++ question. I only mentioned Java as I often make that mistake when switching. – hmjd May 3 '12 at 11:37
1  
@AnishaKaul, fair point. I will add it back. – hmjd May 3 '12 at 11:45

getInstance is a static function of class A. The right form of calling a static function of a class is <class_name>::<static_function_name>.

We can also call the static function by creating object of the class and using . operator: <class_object>.<static_function_name>

share|improve this answer

You can call a static member function using either . or ::. However, if you use class name you need to use the latter and an object then use the former.

share|improve this answer

use scope Resolution Operator ::

e.g.

class::methodName()
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.