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i have this two method

public static void NavigateAndExecute(Node root, Action<Node> actionToExecute)
{
    if (root == null || root.Children == null || root.Children.Count == 0)
        return;
    actionToExecute(root);
    foreach (var node in root.Children)
    {
        actionToExecute(node);
        NavigateAndExecute(node, actionToExecute);
    }
}
public static void NavigateAndExecute(List<Node> root, Action<Node> actionToExecute)
{
    if (root == null || root.Count == 0)
        return;
    foreach (var node in root)
    {                
        NavigateAndExecute(node, actionToExecute);
    }
}

Node class is

public class Node
{
    public String Name { get; set; }
    public List<Node> Children { get; set; }
}

this two methods worked on just the Node class, can make them work on any type T any help.

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1  
How can they work on any type T when e.g. not all types have a Children property? –  Jon May 3 '12 at 11:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You want a Generic Tree Collection. I wrote one years ago which I've open-sourced:

http://simplygenius.net/Article/TreeCollection2

I know the arguments against using Tree data structures, but sometimes they're just what you need.

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You could create a static extension method for IEnumerable<T> that takes a child selector Func<T, IEnumerable<T>>:

    public static void TraverseAndExecute<T>(this IEnumerable<T> items, Func<T, IEnumerable<T>> selector, Action<T> actionToExecute)
    {
        if (items != null)
        {
            foreach (T item in items)
            {
                actionToExecute(item);
                TraverseAndExecute(selector(item), selector, actionToExecute);
            }
        }
    }

Usage with your Node class:

List<Node> nodes = // ...
nodes.TraverseAndExecute(n => n.Children, n => /* action here */);
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I think you want something I have implemented previousely. Note the use of new property Name2 in the main method.

public static class Tree<N>
    where N : Tree<N>.Node
{
    public class Node
    {
        public String Name { get; set; }
        public List<N> Children { get; set; } 
    }

    public static void NavigateAndExecute(N root, Action<N> actionToExecute)
    {
        if (root == null)
            return;
        actionToExecute(root);

        if (root.Children == null || root.Children.Count == 0)
            return;
        NavigateAndExecute(root.Children, actionToExecute);
    }

    public static void NavigateAndExecute(List<N> root, Action<N> actionToExecute)
    {
        if (root == null || root.Count == 0)
            return;
        foreach (var node in root)
        {
            NavigateAndExecute(node, actionToExecute);
        }
    } 

}

public class Node2 : Tree<Node2>.Node
{
    public string Name2 { get; set; }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var root = new Node2();
        Tree<Node2>.NavigateAndExecute(root, n => {
            Console.WriteLine(n.Name2);
        });
    }
}
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I see that you are accessing node.Children which seems a property specific to the Node class. So your code will not work simply by converting the method into a generic method.

However, you can achieve this using generic constraints like:

public static void NavigateAndExecute<T>(List<T> root, Action<T> actionToExecute) where T: Node
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