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when I do:

var foo = new Customer("Peter");
var sth = foo;
var foo2 = foo;

and then:

foo = new Customer("Dave");

only foo is updated and the others will still be "Peter".

But when I do:

foo.Name = "Dave";

then all the objects are updated. Why is this?

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are you sue that foo.Name changes sth.Name and foo2.Name? it should only change foo.Name –  Ivo Bosticky May 3 '12 at 11:57
    
Initially foo, sth and foo2 all point to the same object, so the Name property of that object will appear to change for all three references. Once a different object ("Dave") has been assigned to foo then name changes will no longer appear to affect it. –  open-collar May 3 '12 at 12:00

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When it comes reference types the variable (foo in your example) stores only the reference. When you assign new value to variable you're changing only this variable, not an object it referenced before.

class Customer
{
    public Customer(string name)
    {
        Name = name;
    }
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public static Customer Current { get; set; }
}

The behavior you expect could be done with above code. If you set Customer.Current to some value then every code that asks for Customer.Current will get previously set Customer. However, static variables are usually not good design choice and come with their set of problems (testability, threading issues, etc.).

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any way to change all the references without much hassle? –  user1151923 May 3 '12 at 11:40
    
There could many variables that reference the same object. If you change the object using one of the references then the change visible from every variable pointing to this object. –  empi May 3 '12 at 11:44
    
yes, I understand that, but I want to switch the object with a completely different instance so that all the references get updated and 'see' the new object –  user1151923 May 3 '12 at 11:45
    
It's not possible. There is no method that shows all variables referencing given object. Maybe you should think about some static field ie. Customer.Current. –  empi May 3 '12 at 11:49

Here you assign a new customer object to foo. These three lines mean that foo, sth, and foo2 points to Customer(Peter):

var foo = new Customer("Peter");
var sth = foo;
var foo2 = foo;

But here, you're saying that foo should point to another Customer (Dave). The other "pointers" do not change because they have nothing to do with Dave:

foo = new Customer("Dave");

But here you're saying that the Name property in the Peter object should change to Dave. You're using foo to get the actual object, then changing something in the object itself:

foo.Name = "Dave";

sth and foo2 still points to the object you changed. Their references didn't change; the object itself had an internal change. sth and foo2 doesn't care about that, their only job is to point to whatever they are told.

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If you really want this kind of reference linkage (very strange case, btw), you can create a new class like:

public class CustomerRef
{
     public Customer Obj { get; set; }
}

So your sample code would become:

var foo = new CustomerRef(new Customer("Peter"));  
var sth = foo;  
var foo2 = foo; 

and then

foo.Obj = new Customer("Dave"); 

all variables keep referencing to the new object. If you want to change the name, just do:

foo.Obj.Name = "Dave"; 
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A reference is a variable whose value is the reference to the object. When you change the reference to point to a different object, the value is a new reference. References to the previous object, hence, remain untouched.

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Reference is just an address of object in the heap (classes are reference types). Lets see what happens when you do this:

var foo = new Customer("Peter");
var sth = foo;
var foo2 = foo;

Imagine that heap is USA. When you create new customer Peter, he has some address like 33132 Miami Florida. Consider variables like records in address book. When you assign Peter to some variable, it actually stores only address of Peter, not Peter's body (its little weird to hold people bodies in address book). In your example there are three lines in address book:

var foo = [33132 Miami Florida] // Peter's address
var sth = [33132 Miami Florida] // copy address from foo record
var foo2 = [33132 Miami Florida]

Then you create new customer Dave which live in New Your:

foo = new Customer("Dave");

You erase what is written on line foo in your address book. And put down Dave's address there:

 var foo = [10012 New York, NY] // this is address of Dave!
 var sth = [33132 Miami Florida] // other records in book has not changed
 var foo2 = [33132 Miami Florida]

But when you use address of object to send him messages, this is different story.

foo.Name = "Dave";

This sends message to Peter, who lives in Miami, that he should change his name to Dave. Address of Peter is not changed. So other records also hold Peter's address. What has changed is Peter! And there only one Peter. You just hold his address in several records.

If you take Peter's address from sth record, and send him message 'Hey, somebody at address 33132 Miami Florida, what is your name?', then Peter will send you his new name:

string name = sth.Name;

BTW garbage collector do not kill only those people, which address is present in address book.

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