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For personal interest in Fifo's and development of programs in C, I am stuck with this exercise obviously I make big mistakes. Fifo's got created but no flow inside, must rely on the protection/close/open mechanism of Fifo's. Please help.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <ctype.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <fcntl.h>

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
  int c;
  int fi;
  int fo;
  int stat;
  int pid;
  fprintf(stderr, "Fifo...\n");

  if (mkfifo("FifoA", 0666)==-1) {
    exit(1);
  }

  if (mkfifo("FifoB", 0666)==-1) {
    exit(1);
  }

pid = fork();

  switch (pid) {
  case 0:

  if((fo=open("FifoA",O_RDONLY))==-1)
    {
       perror("error FifoA");
       exit(1);
    }

    close(fi); 
    while (read(fo, &c, 1)>0) {

      c = toupper(c);
      fputc(c,stdout);   
}
    break;
  case -1: 
    fprintf(stderr, "Fork error\n");
    exit(1);
  default:

  if((fi=open("FifoB",O_WRONLY))==-1)
    {
       perror("error FifoB");
       exit(1);
    }
    close(fo); 
    while ((c = fgetc(stdin))!=EOF) {
      write(fi, &c, 1);
    }
    close(fi);
    wait(&stat);
    break;
  }

  return 0; 
}
share|improve this question
    
So the child opens the fifo for writing (O_WRONLY) and then reads from it? And the parent opens for reading and then writes to it? That doesn't look right. – Useless May 3 '12 at 12:18

Open the fifo after you fork(), with O_RDONLY in the child, and O_WRONLY in the parent. This way, the fifo can know that both its ends are open, and start communication. Remember, fifos are unidirectional, O_RDWR doesn't make sense.

You last problem is that you created two different fifos, and expect them to speak to each other.

if((fo=open("FifoA",O_RDONLY))==-1)
//...
if((fi=open("FifoB",O_WRONLY))==-1)

Should be

if((fo=open("FifoA",O_RDONLY))==-1)
//...
if((fi=open("FifoA",O_WRONLY))==-1) 

A fifo has two sides. One process writes form one side, the other reads from the other. You only need one fifo if your only goal is a write-and-read program.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks changed it but still nothing in stdout. – MagnatSony May 3 '12 at 12:04
    
@MagnatSony You confused the parent and the child. – Dave May 3 '12 at 12:22
    
while (read(fo, &c, 1)>0) probably doesn't do completely like you expect; read returns 0 not -1 to indicate the EOF. So the while check is correct. There need to be 2 Fifo's. – MagnatSony May 3 '12 at 13:13
    
Why do you think there needs to be two fifos? – Dave May 3 '12 at 13:48
    
It is part of the exercise. – MagnatSony May 3 '12 at 15:43

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