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I intend to use thread priorities within my Java code. The application shall run on my Linux system:

>uname -a
Linux <host> 3.0.0-15-generic #26-Ubuntu SMP <date> x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux

>java -version
java version "1.6.0_23"
OpenJDK Runtime Environment (IcedTea6 1.11pre) (6b23~pre11-0ubuntu1.11.10.1)
OpenJDK 64-Bit Server VM (build 20.0-b11, mixed mode)

After some reading in the Web I start my test-application with the following command now:

sudo java -XX:+UseThreadPriorities -XX:ThreadPriorityPolicy=1 -jar ThreadPriorityTest.jar

The test-application consists of the following two classes:

package ch.mypackage;

public class CountingRunnable implements Runnable{

private long count=0;
private boolean goOn=true;

public long getCount() {
    return count;
}

public void stop(){
    goOn=false;
}

public void run() {
    for(long iteration=0;goOn&&iteration<Long.MAX_VALUE;++iteration){
        ++count;
    }
}

}




package ch.mypackage;

public class PriorizedCountingThreads {

private static final int NUM_MILLIS_TO_COUNT_FOR = 1*60*1000;
private static CountingRunnable[] runnables;
private static Thread[] threads;

/**
 * @param args
 */
public static void main(String[] args) { 
    Thread.currentThread().setPriority(Thread.MAX_PRIORITY);
    System.out.println("MIN_PRIORITY: "+Thread.MIN_PRIORITY);
    System.out.println("MAX_PRIORITY: "+Thread.MAX_PRIORITY);
    int numPriorityLevels=(Thread.MAX_PRIORITY-Thread.MIN_PRIORITY)+1;
    init(numPriorityLevels);
    startThreads();
    try {
        Thread.sleep(NUM_MILLIS_TO_COUNT_FOR);
    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
    stopRunnables();
    printCounts();
}

private static void printCounts() {
    for(int i=0;i<runnables.length;++i){
        System.out.println(threads[i].getName()+" has priority: "+threads[i].getPriority()+" and count:"+runnables[i].getCount());
    }
}

private static void stopRunnables() {
    for(int i=0;i<runnables.length;++i){
        runnables[i].stop();
    }
}

private static void startThreads() {
    for(int i=0;i<threads.length;++i){
        threads[i].start();
    }
}

private static void init(int numPriorityLevels) {
    runnables=new CountingRunnable[numPriorityLevels];
    threads=new Thread[runnables.length];
    for(int i=0;i<runnables.length;++i){
        int priority=i+1;
        runnables[i]=new CountingRunnable();
        threads[i]=new Thread(runnables[i]);
        threads[i].setPriority(priority);
        threads[i].setName("PriorityThread_"+priority);
    }
}

}

If I let the program count for one minute (NUM_MILLIS_TO_COUNT_FOR=1*60*1000) then I get the following output:

MIN_PRIORITY: 1
MAX_PRIORITY: 10
PriorityThread_1 has priority: 1 and count:12658044343
PriorityThread_2 has priority: 2 and count:19008431582
PriorityThread_3 has priority: 3 and count:30618946099
PriorityThread_4 has priority: 4 and count:34408365142
PriorityThread_5 has priority: 5 and count:36694025023
PriorityThread_6 has priority: 6 and count:40493710165
PriorityThread_7 has priority: 7 and count:42826305342
PriorityThread_8 has priority: 8 and count:42203891414
PriorityThread_9 has priority: 9 and count:43128747383
PriorityThread_10 has priority: 10 and count:43416371500

According to this output the priorities seem to have the expected impact! But if I generate a thread dump with "jstack" or "kill -s QUIT", then I get the following output, which implies that EVERY THREAD HAS THE SAME PRIORITY(prio=10):

    "PriorityThread_10" prio=10 tid=0x00007ff7e406f800 nid=0x12e6 runnable [0x00007ff7e2562000]
   java.lang.Thread.State: RUNNABLE
    at ch.mypackage.CountingRunnable.run(CountingRunnable.java:17)
    at java.lang.Thread.run(Thread.java:679)

"PriorityThread_9" prio=10 tid=0x00007ff7e406d800 nid=0x12e5 runnable [0x00007ff7e2663000]
   java.lang.Thread.State: RUNNABLE
    at ch.mypackage.CountingRunnable.run(CountingRunnable.java:17)
    at java.lang.Thread.run(Thread.java:679)

"PriorityThread_8" prio=10 tid=0x00007ff7e406b000 nid=0x12e4 runnable [0x00007ff7e2764000]
   java.lang.Thread.State: RUNNABLE
    at ch.mypackage.CountingRunnable.run(CountingRunnable.java:17)
    at java.lang.Thread.run(Thread.java:679)

"PriorityThread_7" prio=10 tid=0x00007ff7e4069000 nid=0x12e3 runnable [0x00007ff7e2865000]
   java.lang.Thread.State: RUNNABLE
    at ch.mypackage.CountingRunnable.run(CountingRunnable.java:17)
    at java.lang.Thread.run(Thread.java:679)

"PriorityThread_6" prio=10 tid=0x00007ff7e4067000 nid=0x12e2 runnable [0x00007ff7e2966000]
   java.lang.Thread.State: RUNNABLE
    at ch.mypackage.CountingRunnable.run(CountingRunnable.java:17)
    at java.lang.Thread.run(Thread.java:679)

"PriorityThread_5" prio=10 tid=0x00007ff7e4065000 nid=0x12e1 runnable [0x00007ff7e2a67000]
   java.lang.Thread.State: RUNNABLE
    at ch.mypackage.CountingRunnable.run(CountingRunnable.java:17)
    at java.lang.Thread.run(Thread.java:679)

"PriorityThread_4" prio=10 tid=0x00007ff7e4063000 nid=0x12e0 runnable [0x00007ff7e2b68000]
   java.lang.Thread.State: RUNNABLE
    at ch.mypackage.CountingRunnable.run(CountingRunnable.java:17)
    at java.lang.Thread.run(Thread.java:679)

"PriorityThread_3" prio=10 tid=0x00007ff7e4061000 nid=0x12df runnable [0x00007ff7e2c69000]
   java.lang.Thread.State: RUNNABLE
    at ch.mypackage.CountingRunnable.run(CountingRunnable.java:17)
    at java.lang.Thread.run(Thread.java:679)

"PriorityThread_2" prio=10 tid=0x00007ff7e405d000 nid=0x12de runnable [0x00007ff7e2d6a000]
   java.lang.Thread.State: RUNNABLE
    at ch.mypackage.CountingRunnable.run(CountingRunnable.java:17)
    at java.lang.Thread.run(Thread.java:679)

"PriorityThread_1" prio=10 tid=0x00007ff7e4049800 nid=0x12dd runnable [0x00007ff7e2e6b000]
   java.lang.Thread.State: RUNNABLE
    at ch.mypackage.CountingRunnable.run(CountingRunnable.java:17)
    at java.lang.Thread.run(Thread.java:679)

If I do the same on a Windows machine, the prio values are the correct ones, according to the priority mappings I found here.

So, is this a bug in jstack, or am I doing something wrong?

If I execute "top | grep java" I get the following:

PID USER      PR  NI  VIRT  RES  SHR S %CPU %MEM    TIME+  COMMAND
3394 root      20   0 4444m  15m 8376 S  789  0.1   0:47.52 java 

which implies that the main Thread has a priority of 20, while "top -H | grep java" results in the following output:

 PID USER      PR  NI  VIRT  RES  SHR S %CPU %MEM    TIME+  COMMAND     

 3457 root      15  -5 4444m  15m 8384 R   99  0.1   0:08.60 java
 3456 root      16  -4 4444m  15m 8384 R   97  0.1   0:08.41 java
 3455 root      17  -3 4444m  15m 8384 R   93  0.1   0:08.42 java
 3454 root      18  -2 4444m  15m 8384 R   97  0.1   0:08.27 java
 3453 root      19  -1 4444m  15m 8384 R   97  0.1   0:07.50 java
 3452 root      20   0 4444m  15m 8384 R   51  0.1   0:07.44 java
 3451 root      21   1 4444m  15m 8384 R   35  0.1   0:04.83 java
 3450 root      22   2 4444m  15m 8384 R   99  0.1   0:04.78 java
 3449 root      23   3 4444m  15m 8384 R   95  0.1   0:07.47 java
 3448 root      24   4 4444m  15m 8384 R   18  0.1   0:02.85 java

which shows that the java thread priorities really affect the priorities of the OS-threads.

But where does jstack have a value of 10 in prio=10 from? Is it just an arbitrary value?

share|improve this question
2  
Note that Java threads do not necessarily correspond to system processes/threads (it might be a single process JVM that does the scheduling internally, for example) and thus Java's thread priority does not necessarily match the OS thread priority. –  Thomas May 3 '12 at 12:04
2  
Regardless of whether or not Java threads do correspond to OS threads, the Java priority levels are nowhere specified to be numerically equal to the OS levels. –  EJP May 3 '12 at 12:44
    
@Thomas AFAIK, openJDK don't make use of green threads at all, whatever the platform. –  João Fernandes May 3 '12 at 14:44
    
see also stackoverflow.com/questions/128039/… –  andersoj May 9 '12 at 21:03
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2 Answers 2

Thread priority in Java are a very very sensitive subject... You can find an intersting post on StackOverlow here : http://stackoverflow.com/a/2170304/1343096

Basically try to change your priority policy to 42 :

-XX:ThreadPriorityPolicy=42

Let us know if it does the trick for you!

You can find all the explanations by following the link.

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The Java 7 docs state

NOTE - This utility is unsupported and may or may not be available in future versions of the JDK.

So I would assume that the output of jstack may not be accurate as the implementation details on linux may have changed.

The values reported by htop -H are in line with this article, which you included in your question, and are those upon which the java-processes are sheduled inside the linux kernel.

If you need to map the output of jstack to the threads reported by top -H you only need to convert the nid from jstack to decimal or the pid from top -H to hex. See this article

Regarding your source code: the programm would not terminte when I run it. Three hints when writing production multi-tasking code:

  • If you know everything is done (as after calling printCounts() from main) don't hesitate to use System.exit(0); therby ensuring all threads are terminated.
  • If you want to test your code for behaviour during parallel execution it is often good to create all Threads first and get them to work synchronously. Calling await() on a shared CountDownLatch or CyclicBarrier as first statement of the worker will often do this trick well enough.
  • While boolean read and write is to be atomic as per Java tutorial, I would recommend declaring trigger-variables like your goOn field to be volatile as this also influences how the compiler will optimize your code.

Using either volatile or System.exit(0) your benchmark terminated normally.

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