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Is it a good idea to refactor out test case if two or more test classes, which are testing different implementations of same interface/abstract class, have common tests but with different fixtures?

Lets say code and tests look like this:

interface MathOperation
{
    public function doMath($a, $b);
}

class Sumator implements MathOperation
{
    public function doMath($a, $b)
    {
        return $a + $b;
    }
}


class Multiplicator implements MathOperation
{
    public function doMath($a, $b)
    {
        return $a * $b;
    }
}

// tests
class SumatorTest extends PHPUnit_Framework_TestCase
{
    /**
     * @var Sumator
     */
    protected $sumator;

    public function setUp()
    {
        $this->sumator = new Sumator;
    }

    /**
     * @dataProvider fixtures
     */
    public function testDoMath($a, $b, $expected)
    {
        $result = $this->sumator->doMath($a, $b);
        $this->assertEqual($expected, $result);
    }

    public function fixtures()
    {
        return array(
            array(1, 1, 2);
            array(2, 1, 3);
            array(100, -1, 99);
        );
    }
}

class MultiplicatorTest extends PHPUnit_Framework_TestCase
{
    /**
     * @var Multiplicator
     */
    protected $multiplicator;

    public function setUp()
    {
        $this->multiplicator = new Multiplicator;
    }

    /**
     * @dataProvider fixtures
     */
    public function testDoMath($a, $b, $expected)
    {
        $result = $this->multiplicator->doMath($a, $b);
        $this->assertEqual($expected, $result);
    }

    public function fixtures()
    {
        return array(
            array(1, 1, 1);
            array(2, 1, 2);
            array(100, -1, -100);
        );
    }
}

and I want them (tests) to look like that:

class MathOperationTestCase extends PHPUnit_Framework_TestCase
{
    /**
     * @var MathOperation
     */
    protected $operation;

    public function setUp()
    {
        $this->operation = $this->createImpl();
    }

    /**
     * @return MathOperation
     */
    abstract function createImpl();

    /**
     * @dataProvider fixtures
     */
    public function testDoMath($a, $b, $expected)
    {
        $result = $this->operation->doMath($a, $b);
        $this->assertEqual($expected, $result);
    }

    abstract public function fixtures();
}

class SumatorTest extends MathOperationTestCase
{
    public function createImpl()
    {
        return new Sumator;
    }

    public function fixtures()
    {
        return array(
            array(1, 1, 2);
            array(2, 1, 3);
            array(100, -1, 99);
        );
    }
}

class MultiplicatorTest extends MathOperationTestCase
{
    public function createImpl()
    {
        return new Multiplicator;
    }

    public function fixtures()
    {
        return array(
            array(1, 1, 1);
            array(2, 1, 2);
            array(100, -1, -100);
        );
    }
}

This seems better structured but may lack readability. So in the end I'm not sure is it usable practice.

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4 Answers 4

You have abstracted out the functionality of the PHPUnitTest enough to make it apply to more than one class! Cool. I also see that this becomes problematic if either Sumator or Multiplicator have added functionality in the future- no matter what you do to either class, you will always be confronted with the question as to whether or not you ought to abstract it out to the base class in the testing framwork as well.

This complicates maintainability in my mind, not because you have to adjust multiple classes (which happens either way with a testing class) but because of the added burden of maintaining an additional code structure that you need to keep track of whenever you make a choice for either class.

Unit testing, in my mind, applies in a one-to-one structure for this reason. Your method reduces code duplication in the sense that as long as a class has the same structure and functionality, it is applicable for this test class. On the other hand, in my mind, it opens up the temptation of making classes fit the test, rather than the other way around.

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If your original code changes , the tests have to be changed too. Keep that in mind and then you will see which way can handle changes more easily. What if you decide to separate the interfaces in the future or questions like that might help you decide.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

After some consideration I've reached the conclusion that only upside of this approach is reducing code duplication.

Extracting base test case can only apply to common interfaces of tested classes, but those interfaces cannot force same workflow of business logic we try to test. Lets modify Multiplicator class to prove that point.

class Multiplicator implements MathOperation
{
    private $factor; // added factor which influences result of doMath()

    public function __construct($factor)
    {
        $this->factor = $factor;
    }

    public function doMath($a, $b)
    {
        return ($a * $b) * $factor;
    }
}

Now, although Sumator and Multiplicator share same interface, the way Multiplicator should be tested is totally different e.g.

class MultiplicatorTest extends MathOperationTestCase
{
    // rest of code

    public function testDoMath2($ab, $b, $factor, $expected)
    {
        $multiplicator = new Multiplicator($factor);
        $result = $multiplicator->doMath($a, $b);
        $this->assertEqual($expected, $result);
    }
}

Also I would have to keep backward compatibility with base test case by slight modification of tested class which is huge no-no...

class Multiplicator implements MathOperation
{
    // rest of code

    public function __construct($factor = 1) // default value set in class
    {
        $this->factor = $factor;
    }
}

...or by modyfing tests themselves. And that renders test derived from extracted test case repetitious and somehow useless.

class MultiplicatorTest extends MathOperationTestCase
{
    // rest of code

    public function createImpl()
    {
        return new Multiplicator(1); // added default value
    }
}

All of above adds, besides evident pitfalls, unnecessary complication in terms of readability and maintainability.

Thank everybody for your contribution.

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I find that having a base class for tests is mainly only useful in two cases:

  1. Where the base class solely contains things like common utility/helper methods/classes for the application that you are working on, i.e. common mock class creators.
  2. Where the product under test shares some code with other products, but somewhat extends upon it; thus you mirror this in the test base class and its children.
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