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THe code is here as well: http://jsfiddle.net/wMfMT/5/

This simple block of html:

<div>
    <em><em><em><em><a href="#">fifth</a></em></em></em></em>
    <em><em><em><a href="#">fourth</a></em></em></em>
    <em><em><a href="#">third</a></em></em>
    <em><a href="#">second</a></em>
    <a href="#">first</a>
</div>

and this css:

em {font-size:1.2em}

renders correctly on Firefox (every word is different size), but incorrectly on Chrome (fifth and fourth are the same size). First I thought it's a css issue, but then I inspected the html and it turned out that Chrome rendered it like the following:

<div>
    <em>
        <em>
            <em>
                <em>
                    <a href="#">fifth</a>
                </em>
            </em>
        </em>
<!-- /em missing -->
        <em>
            <em>
                <em>
                    <a href="#">fourth</a>
                </em>
            </em>
        </em>
        <em>
            <em>
                <a href="#">third</a>
            </em>
        </em>
        <em>
            <a href="#">second</a>
        </em>
        <a href="#">first</a>
    </em><!-- this is the lost /em -->
</div>

My questions are:

  1. is my html correct (is it OK according to the standard to nest em-s?)
  2. if yes then is there a workaround? *
  3. is this a known bug and if not where should I report it?

*) I have this code in a WordPress plugin, and many people customized it by adding their own css, so changing from em to span or anything else would brake their sites. I'm looking for a workaround without the need to change the css

Added bugreport at: http://code.google.com/p/chromium/issues/detail?id=126096

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1  
It seems to fix it if you wrap the whole set of "fifth" em elements in a span. Is that an acceptable change, or would that impact your users too? –  James Allardice May 3 '12 at 12:34
    
I'll try that, I believe that should work for 90%, since in my examples I used css that would be ok –  Gavriel May 3 '12 at 12:45
    
Yes it works! Thanks! –  Gavriel May 3 '12 at 12:58
    
No problem, glad I could help :) –  James Allardice May 3 '12 at 12:59

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your HTML seems to be correct and I can reproduce it on Chrome Canary build.

A workaround would be to use spans: http://jsfiddle.net/PeeHaa/tCPd8/

I don't know whether it is a known problem, but you can check out the buglist at http://code.google.com/p/chromium/issues/list

If you also have Safari running you could also test that browser to see whether it is a Webkit or a Chrome bug.

UPDATE

*) I have this code in a WordPress plugin, and many people customized it by adding their own css, so changing from em to span or anything else would brake their sites. I'm looking for a workaround without the need to change the css

I don't see any possibility since the browser simply renders it wrong, so you cannot use it. The only hack I see is using javascript to replace the highest level em with a span with the same styling attached to it.

UPDATE2

As James Allardice has noted you could wrap the stuff in a span to fix the issue if that is ok for your plugin.

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I added the last paragraph to the question, see why I'm looking for a fix without the need to change css –  Gavriel May 3 '12 at 12:34
    
@Gavriel see my updated answer –  PeeHaa May 3 '12 at 12:40

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