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I run across this often enough that I figure there has to be a good idiom for it. Suppose I have a data.frame with a bunch of attributes, including "product." I also have a key which translates products to brand + size. Product codes 1-3 are Tylenol, 4-6 are Advil, 7-9 are Bayer, 10-12 are Generic.

What's the fastest (in terms of human time) way to code this up?

I tend to use nested ifelse's if there are 3 or fewer categories, and type out the data table and merge it in if there are more than 3. Any better ideas? Stata has a recode command that is pretty nifty for this sort of thing, although I believe it promotes data-code intermixing a little too much.

dat <- structure(list(product = c(11L, 11L, 9L, 9L, 6L, 1L, 11L, 5L, 
7L, 11L, 5L, 11L, 4L, 3L, 10L, 7L, 10L, 5L, 9L, 8L)), .Names = "product", row.names = c(NA, 
-20L), class = "data.frame")
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1  
Lots of SO creativity on display here. Going to have a hard time picking an answer. –  Ari B. Friedman May 3 '12 at 15:10
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9 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

One could use a list as an associative array to define the brand -> product code mapping, i.e.:

brands <- list(Tylenol=1:3, Advil=4:6, Bayer=7:9, Generic=10:12)

Once you have this, you can then either invert this to create a product code -> brand list (could take a lot of memory), or just use a search function:

find.key <- function(x, li, default=NA) {
    ret <- rep.int(default, length(x))
    for (key in names(li)) {
        ret[x %in% li[[key]]] <- key
    }
    return(ret)
}

I'm sure there are better ways of writing this function (the for loop is annoying me!), but at least it is vectorised, so it only requires a single pass through the list.

Using it would be something like:

> dat$brand <- find.key(dat$product, brands)
> dat
   product   brand
1       11 Generic
2       11 Generic
3        9   Bayer
4        9   Bayer
5        6   Advil
6        1 Tylenol
7       11 Generic
8        5   Advil
9        7   Bayer
10      11 Generic
11       5   Advil
12      11 Generic
13       4   Advil
14       3 Tylenol
15      10 Generic
16       7   Bayer
17      10 Generic
18       5   Advil
19       9   Bayer
20       8   Bayer

The recode and levels<- solutions are very nice, but they are also significantly slower than this one (and once you have find.key this is easier-for-humans than recode and on par with the levels<-):

> microbenchmark(
     recode=recode(dat$product,recodes="1:3='Tylenol';4:6='Advil';7:9='Bayer';10:12='Generic'"), 
     find.key=find.key(dat$product, brands),
     levels=`levels<-`(factor(dat$product),brands))
Unit: microseconds
      expr      min        lq    median        uq      max
1 find.key   64.325   69.9815   76.8950   83.8445  221.748
2   levels  240.535  248.1470  274.7565  306.8490 1477.707
3   recode 1636.039 1683.4275 1730.8170 1855.8320 3095.938

(I can't get the switch version to benchmark properly, but it appears to be faster than all of the above, although it is even worse-for-humans than the recode solution.)

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Fun solution, but definitely doesn't pass the faster-for-humans muster! –  Ari B. Friedman May 3 '12 at 13:21
    
Why not? find.key is a generic function you can just copy paste into your code and use. –  dbaupp May 3 '12 at 13:25
    
Newer version looks very easy to use. This version didn't: cbind(dat,dat$brand brand=find<- find.key(dat$product, brands)). But now that I actually look at it it's not complicated either. Morning stupidity :-) –  Ari B. Friedman May 3 '12 at 13:34
    
Very nice response and very fast. I like it a lot. +1 –  Tyler Rinker May 3 '12 at 13:41
    
@gsk3, yeah, I had trouble working out how to vectorise find.key and so didn't think how to do the last step very much. Evening mindblank :) –  dbaupp May 3 '12 at 13:47
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You could convert your variable to factor and change it's levels by levels<- function. In one command it could be like:

`levels<-`(
    factor(dat$product),
    list(Tylenol=1:3, Advil=4:6, Bayer=7:9, Generic=10:12)
)

In steps:

brands <- factor(dat$product)
levels(brands) <- list(Tylenol=1:3, Advil=4:6, Bayer=7:9, Generic=10:12)
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This is by far the easiest way, even though your first call to levels<- will probably confuse a lot of people. :) –  Joshua Ulrich May 3 '12 at 14:10
1  
Nice shortcut! I found its explanation here: link –  cafe876 Jul 27 '12 at 7:09
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I like the recode function in the car package:

library(car)

dat$brand <- recode(dat$product,
  recodes="1:3='Tylenol';4:6='Advil';7:9='Bayer';10:12='Generic'")

# > dat
#    product   brand
# 1       11 Generic
# 2       11 Generic
# 3        9   Bayer
# 4        9   Bayer
# 5        6   Advil
# 6        1 Tylenol
# 7       11 Generic
# 8        5   Advil
# 9        7   Bayer
# 10      11 Generic
# 11       5   Advil
# 12      11 Generic
# 13       4   Advil
# 14       3 Tylenol
# 15      10 Generic
# 16       7   Bayer
# 17      10 Generic
# 18       5   Advil
# 19       9   Bayer
# 20       8   Bayer
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the only problem with recode is that it works by processing strings, so if your codes/data happen to have semicolons and = signs in them it's a big headache ... –  Ben Bolker May 3 '12 at 13:25
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I often use the technique below:

key <- c()
key[1:3] <- "Tylenol"
key[4:6] <- "Advil"
key[7:9] <- "Bayer"
key[10:12] <- "Generic"

Then,

> key[dat$product]
 [1] "Generic" "Generic" "Bayer"   "Bayer"   "Advil"   "Tylenol" "Generic" "Advil"   "Bayer"   "Generic"
[11] "Advil"   "Generic" "Advil"   "Tylenol" "Generic" "Bayer"   "Generic" "Advil"   "Bayer"   "Bayer"  
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The "database approach" is to keep a separate table (a data.frame) for your product keys definitions. It makes even more sense since you say your product keys translate into not only a brand, but also a size:

product.keys <- read.table(textConnection("

product brand   size
1       Tylenol small
2       Tylenol medium
3       Tylenol large
4       Advil   small
5       Advil   medium
6       Advil   large
7       Bayer   small
8       Bayer   medium
9       Bayer   large
10      Generic small
11      Generic medium
12      Generic large

"), header = TRUE)

Then, you can join your data using merge:

merge(dat, product.keys, by = "product")
#    product   brand   size
# 1        1 Tylenol  small
# 2        3 Tylenol  large
# 3        4   Advil  small
# 4        5   Advil medium
# 5        5   Advil medium
# 6        5   Advil medium
# 7        6   Advil  large
# 8        7   Bayer  small
# 9        7   Bayer  small
# 10       8   Bayer medium
# 11       9   Bayer  large
# 12       9   Bayer  large
# 13       9   Bayer  large
# 14      10 Generic  small
# 15      10 Generic  small
# 16      11 Generic medium
# 17      11 Generic medium
# 18      11 Generic medium
# 19      11 Generic medium
# 20      11 Generic medium

As you notice, the order of the rows is not preserved by merge. If this is a problem, the plyr package has a join function that does preserve the order:

library(plyr)
join(dat, product.keys, by = "product")
#    product   brand   size
# 1       11 Generic medium
# 2       11 Generic medium
# 3        9   Bayer  large
# 4        9   Bayer  large
# 5        6   Advil  large
# 6        1 Tylenol  small
# 7       11 Generic medium
# 8        5   Advil medium
# 9        7   Bayer  small
# 10      11 Generic medium
# 11       5   Advil medium
# 12      11 Generic medium
# 13       4   Advil  small
# 14       3 Tylenol  large
# 15      10 Generic  small
# 16       7   Bayer  small
# 17      10 Generic  small
# 18       5   Advil medium
# 19       9   Bayer  large
# 20       8   Bayer medium

Finally, if your tables are large and speed is an issue, consider using data.tables (from the data.table package) instead of data.frames.

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Isn't there a ,sort=FALSE option for merge that preserves the order of the rows? –  Ari B. Friedman May 10 '13 at 11:35
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This one takes some typing but if you really do have a huge data set this may be the way to go. Bryangoodrich and Dason at talkstats.com taught me this one. It's using a hash table or creating a environment that contains a look up table. I actually keep this one on my .Rprofile (the hash function that is) for dictionary type look ups.

I replicated your data 1000 times to make it a bit larger.

#################################################
# THE HASH FUNCTION (CREATES A ENW ENVIRONMENT) #
#################################################
hash <- function(x, type = "character") {
    e <- new.env(hash = TRUE, size = nrow(x), parent = emptyenv())
    char <- function(col) assign(col[1], as.character(col[2]), envir = e)
    num <- function(col) assign(col[1], as.numeric(col[2]), envir = e)
    FUN <- if(type=="character") char else num
    apply(x, 1, FUN)
    return(e)
}
###################################
# YOUR DATA REPLICATED 1000 TIMES #
###################################
dat <- dat <- structure(list(product = c(11L, 11L, 9L, 9L, 6L, 1L, 11L, 5L, 
    7L, 11L, 5L, 11L, 4L, 3L, 10L, 7L, 10L, 5L, 9L, 8L)), .Names = "product", row.names = c(NA, 
    -20L), class = "data.frame")
dat <- dat[rep(seq_len(nrow(dat)), 1000), , drop=FALSE]
rownames(dat) <-NULL
dat
#########################
# CREATE A LOOKUP TABLE #
#########################
med.lookup <- data.frame(val=as.character(1:12), 
    med=rep(c('Tylenol', 'Advil', 'Bayer', 'Generic'), each=3))  

########################################
# USE hash TO CREATE A ENW ENVIRONMENT #
########################################  
meds <- hash(med.lookup)  

##############################
# CREATE A RECODING FUNCTION #
##############################          
recoder <- function(x){
    x <- as.character(x) #turn the numbers to character
    rc <- function(x){
       if(exists(x, env = meds))get(x, e = meds) else NA 
    }  
    sapply(x, rc, USE.NAMES = FALSE) 
}
#############
# HASH AWAY #
#############
recoder(dat[, 1])    

In this case hashing is slow but if you have more levels to recode then it will increase in speed over others.

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Somewhat more readable than nested ifelse's:

unlist(lapply(as.character(dat$product), switch,
              `1`=,`2`=,`3`='tylenol',
              `4`=,`5`=,`6`='advil',
              `7`=,`8`=,`9`='bayer',
              `10`=,`11`=,`12`='generic'))

Caveat: not very efficient.

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+1 Not very efficient but kinda fun. –  Ari B. Friedman May 3 '12 at 15:05
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I tend to use this function:

recoder <- function (x, from = c(), to = c()) {
  missing.levels <- unique(x)
  missing.levels <- missing.levels[!missing.levels %in% from]
  if (length(missing.levels) > 0) {
    from <- append(x = from, values = missing.levels)
    to <- append(x = to, values = missing.levels)
  }
  to[match(x, from)]
}

As in:

recoder(x = dat$product, from = 1:12, to = c(rep("Product1", 3), rep("Product2", 3), rep("Product3", 3), rep("Product4", 3)))
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If you have codes in sequential groups like in the example, this may cut the mustard:

cut(dat$product,seq(0,12,by=3),labels=c("Tylenol","Advil","Bayer","Generic"))
 [1] Generic Generic Bayer   Bayer   Advil   Tylenol Generic Advil   Bayer  
[10] Generic Advil   Generic Advil   Tylenol Generic Bayer   Generic Advil  
[19] Bayer   Bayer  
Levels: Tylenol Advil Bayer Generic
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